Female frogs prefer city slickers

first_img Anyone who has tried to whisper sweet nothings into their lover’s ear while standing on a noisy street corner can understand the plight of the túngara frog. A tiny amphibian about the size of a U.S. quarter, the male Physalaemus pustulosus has had to make its call more complex to woo mates when they move from the forest to the city. Now, researchers have found that female túngara frogs from both the country and the city prefer these mouthy city slickers.Biologists have long studied túngara frog courtship, demonstrating that visual signals and calls by themselves are unattractive to females but together are a winning combination, and that a female’s decision to mate depends on the context. Now, researchers have recorded the calls of male frogs living in cities, small towns, and forests across Panama. As they played the calls back, they counted the females, frog-eating bats, and frog-biting insects lured in by each call. Then they transplanted forest-dwelling frogs to the city and city dwellers to the forest to see how females there reacted to their calls. Finally, in the lab, they tested female preference for each call.Males living in cities and towns called more frequently and had more complex calls—with louder “chucks” interspersed in the whine—than forest frogs, the team reports today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. When they were moved into the country, they simplified their calls; but when their country cousins were brought to the big city, they couldn’t make the switch, and kept singing simply. When the researchers played back the calls to females, the females preferred more complex calls, even if the female herself was from the country, they reported. Female frogs prefer city slickers Danita Delimont/Alamy Stock Photo Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Thus, the city frogs not only upped their game, but they were also able to adjust to being in the country again. Because the more complex calls attract more predators and pests, it’s likely that country frogs never added the loud “chucks” to their repertoire, the researchers note. But given that urban areas have fewer bats and insects, the city frogs suffer no penalty for jazzing up their love songs. By Elizabeth PennisiDec. 10, 2018 , 11:05 AMlast_img read more

Radical openaccess plan delayed a year as revised effort seeks more support

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Tania RabesandratanaMay. 30, 2019 , 7:01 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Radical open-access plan delayed a year as revised effort seeks more support Email BENEDETTO CRISTOFANI/SALZMAN ART Plan S, the program to crack down on scientific journals’ paywalls led by European research funders, has fleshed out and relaxed some of its rules in revised implementation guidelines published today. The update addresses many concerns raised by researchers, librarians, and scientific publishers about Plan S’s rollout, allowing more time before full, immediate open access (OA) is required and dropping the proposed cap on publishing fees that funders will pay to journals.The architects of Plan S “have engaged in a good quality dialogue” with the people and institutions that are going to deal with the plan’s consequences, says Lidia Borrell-Damián, director for research and innovation at the European University Association in Brussels. As a result, the revised guidelines seem “much more nuanced and more realistic” than the initial set, says astrophysicist Luke Drury, former president of the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin.Still unclear is whether the changes will convince other funders to join the movement. And the plan’s fiercest detractors are unmoved. “The changes are cosmetic and trivial. They more or less ignored the critique,” says Lynn Kamerlin, a structural biologist at Uppsala University in Sweden who co-authored an open letter against Plan S in November 2018 that now has about 1800 signatories. Launched in September 2018, Plan S is a radical proposal to mandate full and immediate OA to scientific papers stemming from research funded by cOAlition S, a group of 19 public and private funder organizations that back the plan. After 2 months of heated debate, cOAlition S released draft implementation guidelines for public scrutiny; the draft received about 600 responses—mostly from Europe, but including 75 responses from the United States and eight from Argentina.In the updated rules and guidelines, the essence of Plan S remains the same, but some technical requirements have been relaxed. The update includes a later deadline for full, immediate OA and provides clarity on ways scientists can comply with Plan S.One of the main changes is a 1-year extension: Plan S rules will now apply to calls for research proposals by cOAlition S funders starting in 2021, instead of the previously announced 2020 kickoff. Considering the time necessary to start those research projects and publish results, this means the mandate will apply to papers published starting in 2022 or 2023, John-Arne Røttingen, chief executive of the Research Council of Norway in Oslo and one of the leaders of the task force in charge of the update to Plan S rules, told journalists this week.In another big change that several critics had called for, Plan S shelved—for now—the idea of capping the amount funders will pay for article-processing charges (APCs), the fees some journals charge to publish OA articles. Instead, the funders say they will require price transparency from publishers—a breakdown of what’s behind APCs so that researchers can compare publishing venues before choosing one.“It is significant that Coalition S listened to feedback that different approaches to peer review, as part of publishing, require different APCs,” said Bill Moran, publisher of the Science family of journals in Washington, D.C. (Science’s News section is editorially independent.)Many publishers are happy to provide such transparency about their fees, says Niamh O’Connor, chair-elect of the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers in London. “This will help us to show people what those costs are; it’s not uncommon for authors or referees to wonder about them.”Plan S funders for their part hope more transparency will allow authors to make more efficient, “evidence-based” decisions rather than choosing based on journals’ perceived reputation and quality.This is a secondary goal for cOAlition S—not only to make publishing more open, but to shake up the research assessment system. To do so, cOAlition S funders now say they will implement principles by 2021, such as those of the 2012 San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment, which states that research should be assessed on its own merit and not the journal in which it was published. The coalition’s members won’t be required to sign the declaration itself, although some of them already have.“Shifting the research assessment culture is the biggest stumbling block,” says Drury, who authored a response to the draft Plan S guidance by All European Academies, a federation of European academies of sciences and humanities. Plan S funders will need to be explicit and proactive to enact such profound change. For example, funders should back initiatives to develop new metrics so that scientists can stop relying on journals as proxies for a paper’s quality when evaluating a grant application. “They need to set a road map with a clear timeline,” says Gareth O’Neill, a linguist at Leiden University in the Netherlands and outgoing president of the European Council of Doctoral Candidates and Junior Researchers; actions could include bias training for evaluators.The revised guidelines also spell out Plan S funders’ support for the Open Access 2020 Initiative, which aims to shift money from journal subscriptions to OA publishing through “read-and-publish” deals between publishers and consortia of institutions. These agreements negotiate a price for researchers at a group of institutions or in a whole country to read and publish OA papers for an overall fee, instead of paying individual APCs and subscription costs.These often lengthy contract negotiations “are more manageable for larger publishers,” O’Connor says. cOAlition S says it will develop model contracts to help smaller publishers, in particular, scientific society journals, to enter these so-called “transformative agreements.” It will also try to help smaller publishers with a new “transformative journal” option, in which subscription journals would be compliant and eligible for Plan S funding until the end of 2024 if they commit to increasing OA content gradually, to reach 100% within an agreed time frame. This won’t work for everybody, O’Connor says, but it’s a “positive step” that Plan S now offers compliance routes for smaller publishers.The updated guidance also clarifies Plan S’s stance on hybrid journals—publications that charge subscription fees to readers as well as APCs for authors who choose to publish OA. Plan S still wants to crack down on what critics call “double-dipping,” and push journals to move to a full OA model. So the cOAlition S funders won’t pay hybrid journals’ APCs, but researchers who pay such fees from another source can be Plan S compliant as long as the final article is freely accessible online immediately after publication.Finally, Plan S’s revamped rules give more prominence to “green” OA, in which scientists post peer-reviewed papers in OA repositories. The new rules also relax the technical requirements for such repositories.On the whole, cOAlition S “really seem[s] to have listened to the research community. There are no major sticking points anymore,” O’Neill says. “Now, we’ll watch them, see what works and what doesn’t, and hold them accountable.”*Correction, May 31, 7:15 a.m.: This story was corrected to clarify Plan S rules for hybrid journals.last_img read more

Quake with 73 magnitude strikes in eastern Indonesia no reports of major

first_img ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Earthquake of 6.2 magnitude strikes in eastern Indonesia Earthquake of magnitude 6.6 strikes Indonesia: report Post Comment(s) By Reuters |Jakarta | Updated: July 14, 2019 6:25:20 pm The national disaster mitigation agency also said the quake did not have the potential to case a tsunami, and asked people to remain calm and on alert for more aftershocks.Last week, the BMKG issued a tsunami warning, which was later lifted, after a magnitude 6.9 quake hit off the northeastern shore of Sulawesi, west of Sunday’s quake.Indonesia is situated on the so-called Pacific Ring of Fire, which is frequently hit by earthquakes and sometimes accompanying tsunamis.The most devastating in recent Indonesian history was on Dec. 26 in 2004, when a magnitude 9.5 quake triggered a massive tsunami that killed around 226,000 people along the shorelines of the Indian Ocean, including more than 126,000 in Indonesia.Last year, a tsunami hit the city of Palu in Sulawesi, killing thousands. Indonesia hunts for survivors as tsunami death toll crosses 400, thousands homeless The agency said the main quake was felt in other parts of Indonesia, including cities on Sulawesi island and in Sorong on Papua island.The quake hit hours after a magnitude 6.6 struck offshore Western Australia, south of Indonesia.“There are no reports of infrastructure damage yet,” said Iksan Subur, an official with Indonesia’s disaster mitigation agency based in the regency of South Halmahera, near the earthquake’s epicentre.“But people panicked and ran out of their houses. Some people who live near the ocean are starting to move to higher ground,” he told Reuters by phone.center_img Indonesia earthquake, Earthquake, Earthquake in Indonesia, indonesia, USGS, Ternate, Ternate indonesia, ternate earthquake, World news, Indian Express The earthquake occurred at a depth of 10 km (6 miles) at an area 168 km south-southeast of Ternate. (Google Maps)A magnitude 7.3 earthquake struck the Moluccas islands in eastern Indonesia on Sunday, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported, causing panic among residents, but there were no immediate reports of casualties or major damage. Best Of Express Advertising Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Related News Advertising The quake occurred at a depth of 10 km (6 miles) in an area 168 km south-southeast of the city of Ternate, the USGS said.Indonesia’s meteorology agency (BMKG) said the quake was not in danger of causing a tsunami.At least seven aftershocks stronger than magnitude 5 were recorded following the main quake, BMKG official Rahmat Triyono said in a statement.last_img read more

Synthetic DNA vaccine targets proteins overexpressed in several types of cancer

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 28 2018Scientists at The Wistar Institute have implemented a novel structurally designed synthetic DNA vaccine to simultaneously target multiple members of a family of proteins that are specifically overexpressed in several types of cancer. This approach addressed a difficult issue in cancer immunotherapy, specifically how to simultaneously drive antitumor immune responses against multiple tumor antigens in a single, easily delivered formulation. The new strategy could simplify immunotherapy treatment and may prevent cancer escape from immune pressure as the immune system could attack the cancer at multiple susceptible target points. The new vaccine, targeting the human cancer-associated MAGE-A family of proteins, is effective and safe in a melanoma preclinical model, as described in a paper published online in Clinical Cancer Research.Because their expression is restricted to tumor cells, proteins belonging to the MAGE-A family represent promising targets for immunotherapy. Yet, cancer vaccines targeting the original MAGE-A3 member, which has the highest expression in several solid tumors, have thus far failed to demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials.In an attempt to solve this conundrum and advance the clinical applications of this promising immunotherapy, researchers at Wistar performed a thorough analysis of the expression levels of all the twelve proteins in the MAGE-A family in human cancers. They observed that many of the MAGE-A members, and not just MAGE-A3, are highly expressed on tumor cells in several cancer types, some of them being present simultaneously in the same patient. These findings suggest that previous vaccines with limited focus on one target were likely not effective in driving strong T-cell immunity because of the natural immune dampening system known as immune tolerance.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerHIV DNA persists in spinal fluid despite treatment, linked to cognitive impairment”The combination of structural design and synthetic DNA technology offers ample flexibility and specificity in the development of a designer target immunogen,” said lead researcher David B. Weiner, Ph.D., executive vice president of The Wistar Institute, director of The Wistar Institute Vaccine & Immunotherapy Center, and W.W. Smith Charitable Trust Professor in Cancer Research. “We amalgamated structurally relevant primary sequences from multiple MAGE-A members, obtaining an optimized consensus DNA vaccine capable of targeting seven MAGE-A family members simultaneously. This vaccine is recognized by the host immune system much more robustly, resulting in improved immune performance.”Tested in mice, the vaccine induced immune cross-reaction with multiple MAGE-A proteins and induced a robust CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response.”CD8+ T cells are the predominant effectors in the response to immunotherapy; we can think of them as the Navy Seals of cancer immunology,” added Weiner.Importantly, the vaccine significantly slowed tumor growth and prolonged survival in a mouse model of melanoma. The researchers observed reduced invasion in the skin, which was associated with accumulation of CD8+ T cells into the tumors, demonstrating the ability of the vaccine to drive antitumor immunity of importance for melanoma therapy.”Our cross-reactive vaccine has a significant advantage in preventing tumor escape compared to previously designed MAGE-A3-specific vaccines,” said Elizabeth K. Duperret, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow in the Weiner Lab and first author on the study. “Patients whose tumors express multiple members of this family of antigens represent an important group to study the benefits of this immunotherapy approach.” Source:https://wistar.org/news/press-releases/targeting-multiple-members-family-tumor-antigens-synthetic-dna-vaccine-showslast_img read more

Facebook Comes Up With a New Data Access Plan

first_imgAs with its past data scandals, the Facebook faithful largely have stayed with the network. This time, the company has acknowledged that privacy is a concern, which might be enough to sway even its harshest critics.”Facebook has taken multiple steps to make privacy settings and controls easier to find and control,” said Greg Sterling, vice president of strategy and insight at the Local Search Association.”These will matter to some but probably not most Facebook users, as most people don’t read terms of service, for example,” he told TechNewsWorld.”The company has also restricted third-party data usage and tried to put in place other controls to prevent future abuses by outside companies seeking to mine or exploit Facebook user data,” Sterling noted.Those measures might not even matter to the core users, “because we are conditioned to participate in social media,” CyberScout’s Levin told TechNewsWorld.”It is almost built into our DNA at this point,” he said. “Facebook can weather it, and even when people say they’ll use an alternative it doesn’t matter, because they own those alternatives. They own countless companies that we haven’t even heard of.” More Than Saving Face Users Won’t Sign Off Two of the more significant changes affect the Data Providers and Partner Categories and the App Controls. Facebook last week signaled it would shut down the Partner Categories, which had allowed the use of third-party targeting capabilities.In addition the App Controls will be modified, as of Monday, to provide users with a link at the top of the News Feed that offers information on the apps that can be used and the information that will be shared. Users will have the option to remove the apps.Further, users will be notified if their information might have been shared improperly with Cambridge Analytica. The transfer of data that resulted in the exposure of as many as 87 million users’ data without their permission was in violation of Facebook’s policies.Cambridge Analytica may have used that data in connection with President Donald Trump’s campaign. Previously the number of people whose data had been shared without permission was said to be up to 50 million, but on Wednesday’s call Zuckerberg revised that number upward to 87 million.Cambridge Analytica has disputed the numbers. The new efforts to ensure user privacy are really part of a good business strategy. It isn’t just users that the company needs to reassure. Following Zuckerberg’s call, Facebook’s share price rose on Thursday.”The company has lost some trust with consumers, but ultimately its revenues and usage in the U.S. won’t be dramatically impacted,” said LSA’s Sterling.”Facebook’s latest public statements about locking down data sharing is a first step, but it’s not enough to speak to the media about the actions they are taking,” suggested Netpop’s Crandall.When it comes to accessing personal information, technology companies are in a more powerful position than ever, he added.”It’s essential to talk directly to the member community and protect those who decided to share real, intimate facts about themselves with others on the Facebook platform,” Crandall said.However, advertisers don’t seem to have been moved in any way, and it is business as usual, noted Sterling.”The most dramatic move the company has made is its commitment to extend GDPR protections to users around the world, and that is a significant decision that holds implications for some of Facebook’s rivals,” he pointed out. “Overall, some of what Facebook is doing is a sincere effort to rectify problems and issues, and some of it is intended to mollify politicians and legislators who might now be more inclined to regulate the company.” Facebook Falloutcenter_img Less-Connected Social Network This is not the first time Facebook has faced a backlash over privacy concerns.”It is not surprising; it is shocking but not surprising,” said consumer advocate Adam Levin, founder of CyberScout.”Facebook has been on the edge of this catastrophe for a long time,” said Josh Crandall, principal analyst at Netpop Research.”The company has leveraged data mining to encourage users to spend more time on the site and enable advertisers to target likely consumers more effectively than ever before,” he told TechNewsWorld.”To promote the growth of a developer ecosystem, Facebook provided third-party developers access to their users’ data as well,” Crandall noted. “Access to user data enables developers to create more viral applications.” Facebook on Wednesday announced an update to its policies for restricting data access on its platform. The move came just two weeks after the company said it would take a “hard look” at the information apps could use when connected to Facebook.CEO Mark Zuckerberg also discussed some of Facebook’s new efforts to shore up user privacy protections in a 45-minute long Q&A with members of the media on Wednesday.Facebook will implement nine changes, which will allow users to set privacy levels and limit automatic data sharing. The changes will affect the Events API, Groups API, Pages API, Facebook Login, Instagram Platform API, Search and Account Recovery, Call and Text History, Data Providers and Partner Categories, and App Controls.The Events API no longer will allow apps to access the guest list or posts on the event wall. Only Facebook-approved apps that agree to strict requirements will be allowed to connect with the Events API.The Pages API will no longer allow apps to read posts or comments from any page, and all future app access will have to be approved by Facebook.Facebook also has made big changes to the login. It will require approval of all apps that request access to information such as check-ins, likes, photos, videos, events and groups.The Search and Account Recovery features that allowed searches using phone numbers have been disabled to avoid abuse. Peter Suciu has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2012. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile phones, displays, streaming media, pay TV and autonomous vehicles. He has written and edited for numerous publications and websites, including Newsweek, Wired and FoxNews.com.Email Peter.last_img read more

Eye scan shows promise to diagnose central nervous system disorders

first_img“The first concrete results from this project are not expected until the first quarter of 2019 but preliminary investigations are highly promising and suggest that we will be able to obtain high-resolution data about the structure of the retina in future and information about its molecular composition,” says Rainer Leitgeb, Project Leader from the Center for Biomedical Physics at the Medical University of Vienna.  Molecular look into the human eye To achieve this, the research team are using a combination of several complementary optical techniques, which provide detailed information about the condition of the eye tissue: highly sensitive molecular Raman spectroscopy is combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT). In a matter of seconds, this produces high-resolution images from all layers of the retina – including all the information about their molecular composition. Using this data, it will be possible, in future, to make a definitive diagnosis and detect neurodegenerative diseases at an early stage. “The earlier, the better the patient’s chances are,” emphasises Leitgeb. “It would be wrong to anticipate the results. But one thing is clear: it is possible to take a molecular look into the human eye.”  Related StoriesResearchers map full-body muscular activity of Hydra during movementProtein found in the eye can protect against diabetic retinopathy’Eye-in-a-dish’ model helps scientists to uncover ‘surprising’ AMD gene variantAnd it is quicker and less invasive than ever before: “Neurodegenerative diseases not only damage the brain but also cause changes in the retina. With our technique, which operates with light, we no longer need to look into the brain. Our goal is for a patient to be able to sit in front of the equipment, have their eye scanned contact-free and be given a reliable diagnosis in only a few minutes,” explains the MOON project leader from Vienna.  Experts estimate that the number of people worldwide affected by neurodegenerative diseases will double over the next 30 years, which would be a huge burden for the healthcare system. “However, if we can delay the onset of Alzheimer’s by five years, this is not only a huge benefit to sufferers and their families but would also save resources on intensive treatment. Here we are talking about billions of euros. The focus of our research therefore mirrors the strategic direction of Horizon 2020: we are working on the solution to a huge societal challenge.”  Source: https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/en/about-us/news/detailsite/2018/news-im-september-2018/eye-scan-a-promising-option-for-early-detection-of-central-nervous-system-disorders/ Oct 12 2018Partners from Austria – represented by Medical University of Vienna – Germany, France and the Netherlands are taking part in the EU “MOON” project (multimodal optical diagnostics for age-related diseases of the eye and central nervous system) to develop new techniques for early diagnosis of these diseases and successfully apply them in treatment and diagnosis. Around 18 months after the start of “MOON”, researchers are confident that, in future, it will be possible to use an “eye scan” to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer’s or to detect aggressive forms of age-related macular degeneration at an early stage – based on structural and molecular tissue changes on the retina.  last_img read more

Podcast KHNs What the Health Republicans preexisting political problem

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 18 2018 Related StoriesMedicare going in ‘right direction’ on opioid epidemicMedicare recipients may pay more for generics than their brand-name counterparts, study findsEmploying new federal rule on health insurance plans could save moneyPlus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:Julie Rovner: The New York Times’ “Is Medicare for All the Answer to Sky-High Administrative Costs?” by Austin FraktStephanie Armour: The Associated Press’ “Study: Without Medicaid Expansion, Poor Forgo Medical Care,” by Ricardo Alonso-ZaldivarRebecca Adams: The New Yorker’s “Rural Georgians Want Medicaid, But They’re Divided on Stacey Abrams, the Candidate Who Wants to Expand It,” by Charles BetheaJoanne Kenen: Seven Days Vermont’s “Obituary: Madelyn Linsenmeir, 1988-2018.”To hear all our podcasts, click here.And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play. Ensuring that people with preexisting health conditions can get and keep health insurance has become one of the leading issues around the country ahead of this fall’s midterm elections. And it has put Republicans in something of a bind — many either voted to repeal these coverage protections as part of the 2017 effort in Congress or have signed onto a lawsuit that would invalidate them.Meanwhile, the Trump administration, eager to show progress regarding high prescription drug costs — another issue important to voters — has issued a regulation that would require prices to be posted as part of television drug advertisements.Also this week: an interview with California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, a former member of Congress who is using his current post to pursue a long list of health initiatives.This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call, Stephanie Armour of The Wall Street Journal and Joanne Kenen of Politico.Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast: Congress passed a package of bills addressing the nation’s opioid epidemic on a rare note of bipartisanship. Many of the measures are designed to help prevent opioid addiction but are short on treatment options. Democrats have made health care — especially the protections for people with preexisting conditions — their central strategy in midterm campaigns. It’s an issue that the GOP did not want to be campaigning on. Republicans say that despite their moves to destroy the federal health law, they would work to preserve coverage options for people with preexisting conditions. But they don’t lay out what those options would be and earlier efforts have major loopholes, Democrats point out. The announcement by federal health officials this week that they want drug prices added to advertisements about the products is expected to have marginal effects because pricing is so complicated. If the federal government requires drugmakers to post their prices on ads, the manufacturers are widely expected to sue based on First Amendment issues. Open enrollment for Medicare began this week and runs until Dec. 7. Medicare Advantage, the private-plan option for enrollees, is becoming increasingly popular and now covers more than a third of Medicare beneficiaries. But while Medicare Advantage offers many benefits the traditional program does not — frequently including dental and foot care — a recent report from the inspector general at the Department of Health and Human Services finds that some of these plans may be wrongly denying care to Medicare patients. At the same time, Medicare beneficiaries who choose to use Medicare Advantage plans may be in for a shock if they later decide to switch back to the traditional form of Medicare. They may not be eligible at that point to buy a Medigap plan to help cover their cost sharing. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Providing minimal assistance can take emotional toll on older caregivers

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 23 2019Providing less than an hour of help to an elderly person can take a surprising emotional toll on older caregivers, says a University of Michigan researcher.Caregivers 60 and older who provide “marginal” assistance–spending up to an hour helping often with just one activity–report worse well-being than those who help two hours a day handling various activities, according to Vicki Freedman, research professor at the U-M Institute for Social Research.Freedman and colleagues said the finding is counterintuitive to well-established thinking that caring for more hours poses a greater psychological burden on family and other unpaid caregivers.”It may be that these marginally involved caregivers find it harder to incorporate care into their busy lives,” Freedman said. “Or it could be those with worse well-being are less able to take on a more substantial caregiving role.”Caregivers perform various tasks such as household chores (preparing meals, laundry), personal and medical care (bathing, dressing, giving medicine), companionship and transportation (running errands or trips to doctor’s office).Related StoriesSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchOlympus launches next-generation X Line objectives for clinical, research applicationsResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyThe U-M study is novel because it considers both what caregivers do and when in the day they do it, Freedman said. Unlike previous research that tracks less granular responses over longer periods, such as the past month, the study uses 24-hour time diary data to explore if there are distinctive care patterns throughout the day affecting caregivers’ well-being.”We were able to see five distinct care patterns, including a large number of days on which caregivers were marginally involved,” Freedman said.Other days consisted of a mixture of care activities for about two hours; more substantial amounts of care, especially with household chores and transportation; and persistent care throughout the day, either with transportation and companionship or with household chores.The data came from the national Panel Study of Income Dynamics at U-M, which began in 1968 and is the longest running longitudinal household survey in the world. The sample consisted of 511 diary days with at least one reported care activity from adults 60 and older.For each activity on the previous day, respondents reported details about what they did, including how long they did it. They also responded to questions about how they felt (well-being)–calm, happy, sad, frustrated or worried–during randomly selected activities.On average, older caregivers spent just over two hours helping on days they assisted adults with daily activities. The time of day was not as important as the type of care in shaping well-being, the researchers said.​Source: https://umich.edu/last_img read more

Researchers identify regulatory mechanism underlying obesity

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 31 2019Obesity − as research in the past decade has shown − is first and foremost a brain disease. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München, partners in the German Center for Diabetes Research, have now discovered a molecular switch that controls the function of satiety neurons and therefore body weight. The findings were published in the journal ‘Nature Metabolism’.The worldwide epidemic of obesity has reached record levels, and what was once a problem only of industrialized countries is now also affecting the developing world. Consequently, scientists are working with great commitment to identify the mechanisms underlying the disease in order to find new treatments. Researchers at the Institute of Diabetes and Obesity (IDO) of Helmholtz Zentrum München have recently taken a further step in this direction.Related StoriesHarnessing target of the brain chemical serotonin to combat obesityNovel program in England’s third largest city helps reduce childhood obesityUranium toxicity might have caused obesity and diabetes in Kuwait, finds new studyYin and yang of energy metabolism”Whether we’re hungry or feel full is largely determined in the brain – specifically in the hypothalamus,” explains IDO scientist Dr. Alexandre Fisette, together with Dr. Carmelo Quarta lead co-authors of the aforementioned paper. “Two groups of neurons in the hypothalamus control body weight and energy balance via various molecular messengers. Like yin and yang, they help strike a good balance.” While neurons known as Agrp increase appetite, their counterparts, Pomc neurons, produce a sensation of satiety. However, if the interplay between the two is disturbed, the result can be obesity or type 2 diabetes.”In our recent study we discovered that a transcription factor called Tbx3 plays a key role in this mechanism,” says Carmelo Quarta, describing the new findings. “Specifically, in the absence of Tbx3, the neurons responsible for producing a feeling of satiety are no longer able to synthesize the expected molecular messengers.” Applying a broad range of techniques, the scientists were then able to show that Tbx3 plays a pivotal role in maintaining energy and sugar metabolism.Lack of Tbx3 leads to an identity crisis”Both in a preclinical model and in fruit flies, the absence of Tbx3 leads to a kind of identity crisis of satiety neurons, resulting in obesity,” says Alexandre Fisette. The same signaling pathways also appear to be present in humans: “In preliminary experiments with human neurons, we were able to show that they are no longer able to carry out their function in the absence of Tbx3,” Carmelo Quarta adds.”Humans with genetic defects in the Tbx3 gene have long been reported to suffer from obesity,” explains study director Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Matthias H. Tschöp, CEO of Helmholtz Zentrum München and holder of the Chair for Metabolic Diseases at the Technical University of Munich “Our study explains for the first time the underlying mechanisms and once again focuses attention on the central role of the brain in regulating energy metabolism. We hope that Tbx3 may come into consideration one day as a target for drug therapies.” Source:https://www.helmholtz-muenchen.de/last_img read more

New technology can detect any virus that poses a threat to humans

first_imgBy Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Feb 5 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have developed a computational method that designs molecular “baits” for any strains of virus known to infect humans. This includes viruses such as Zika, which are difficult to detect due to their low abundance in clinical samples.molekuul_be | ShutterstockThe new approach could help genomic sequencing centers across the world monitor disease more effectively and cheaply, which is essential for controlling and managing outbreaks.During the 2015-to-2016 Zika outbreak, public health authorities struggled to contain the epidemic, while researchers worldwide tried to understand the genetics of the virus.However, the low abundance of Zika particles in the blood samples of affected individuals made it extremely difficult for researchers to capture the genetic material of the virus.As reported in the journal Nature Biotechnology, Hayden Metsky, Kate Siddle and colleagues have now developed a computational method called CATCH, short for “Compact Aggregation of Targets for Comprehensive Hybridization.” The technology enables researchers to design probes that will capture the genetic material of any combination of microbes, including any viral strain known to infect humans.After inputting the genomes of any human virus that has been uploaded to the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s GenBank sequence database, CATCH will determine the optimal set of probes for recovering the genetic material.Those sequences can then be sent to companies that synthesize the research probes. Those probes can then be used to isolate the desired microbial DNA so that it can be sequenced, thereby enriching clinical samples for the microbe of interest.Using this technique, Metsky and team developed probes that helped them discover that Zika had spread to several geographic regions months before scientists had been able to detect it. The technology’s potential to improve genomic surveillance could inform attempts to control epidemics in the future. The method could also be a powerful tool for investigating undiagnosed fevers that researchers suspect to be caused by a virus. As genomic sequencing becomes a critical part of disease surveillance, tools like CATCH will help us and others detect outbreaks earlier and generate more data on pathogens that can be shared with the wider scientific and medical research communities.”Christian Matranga, Co-senior Author The CATCH software has been made publicly available and can be accessed on GitHub. We’re excited about the potential to use metagenomic sequencing to shed light on those cases and, in particular, the possibility of doing so locally in affected countries.”Kate Siddle, Co-senior Authorlast_img read more

Study reveals dual effects of new osteoporosis therapy on bone tissue

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 26 2019Sclerostin is a protein produced by osteocytes in the bone that inhibits bone formation. A recent analysis of results from a clinical trial reveals the beneficial effects of romosozumab, an antibody therapy that targets sclerostin, on bone tissue in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The findings are published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.Romosozumab increases serum markers of bone formation and decreases those of bone breakdown, or resorption. This is associated with an increased bone mineral density and a reduced risk of bone fractures.Related StoriesEarly exposure to antacids could put infants at risk for bone fractures during childhoodResearchers examine strains between bone and graft from animal modelsJefferson researcher discovers a population of bone cells that subdues cancerThis latest analysis included 107 patients with osteoporosis who were enrolled in the multicenter, phase 3 clinical trial called the Fracture Study in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis (FRAME) study and who underwent bone biopsies. The analysis showed that at the tissue level, romosozumab produced an early and transient increase in bone formation and a persistent decrease in bone resorption. This led to significant increases in bone mass and improved bone microarchitecture (Figure) after 12 months of therapy. These effects contribute to the reduced fracture risk previously reported in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis treated with romosozumab. Source:WileyJournal reference:Chavassieux, P. et al. (2019) Bone‐Forming and Antiresorptive Effects of Romosozumab in Postmenopausal Women With Osteoporosis: Bone Histomorphometry and Microcomputed Tomography Analysis After 2 and 12 Months of Treatment. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.3735. Romosozumab is the first osteoporosis therapy with a dual effect on bone tissue, increasing bone formation and decreasing resorption.”Lead author Dr. Pascale Chavassieux, of the University of Lyon, in Francelast_img read more

Study 1 in 3 people with hypertension dont monitor their condition and

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 7 2019Study conducted as part of blood pressure-measuring campaign MMM18 shows that that one in three people with hypertension don’t monitor it (35.5%), and one in five don’t follow any sort of treatment (19%).Internal Medicine professor at the CEU Cardenal Herrera University, Enrique Rodilla Sala, has given an oral presentation at the 29th European Meeting on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Protection, held in Milan. In it, he revealed the results in Spain of international blood pressure-measuring campaign May Measurement Month 2018 (MMM18), backed by the Spanish Hypertension Society (SEH-LELHA) and where the CEU UCH was the only partaking Spanish university. Among the results obtained from the 7,511 cases studied, it is worth noting that one in three people with hypertension don’t monitor it (35.5%), and one in five don’t follow any sort of treatment (19%). Alcohol and tobacco consumption and diabetes were detected as the most frequent risk factors.As professor Enrique Rodilla explains: Hypertense youthProfessor Rodilla also revealed in Milan the results of the 1,009 cases registered in MMM18 by the 99 Medicine students of the CEU UCH in Valencia and Castellón who took part in the campaign. Of these 1,009 cases, 58.5% were under the age of 30 of the university environment, with an average 21 years of age. In this group of young population, 12.5% of participants were found to be hypertense, with the most frequent risk factors among youth being male gender, obesity and excess weight.Related StoriesHealthy blood vessels could help stave off cognitive declineAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new study”In total, In the MMM19 campaign, we sent 129 cases of young hypertense adults for their assessment in the Primary Attention Centres, which is why we believe these campaigns to monitor hypertension are also important for the younger population, which is typically not added to this type of studies. In this sense, the participation of universities such as the CEU UCH plays a key role, which is why we are maintaining our collaboration this year,” highlights professor Rodilla.”Vascular age” and injuries to target organs´Two more studies from the CEU Cardenal Herrera University were presented at the 29th European Meeting on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Protection. One of them is the result of the collaboration between the CEU UCH and the SEFAC in the RIVALFAR project to calculate the “vascular age” of the Valencian population, and has constituted the doctoral thesis of SEFAC chemist Vicente Colomer, under the guidance of CEU UCH professors Lucrecia Moreno and Enrique Rodilla. It analyzed the differences in the increase in central aortic pressure among people with normal blood pressure and hypertense people.The fourth work presented at the scientific gathering was the work of Medicine student Eloy Sempere Moreno, who analysed in his Bachelor Dissertation the association between the carotid intima-media thickness, as an injury to a target organ, and other arterial hypertension markers in pre-hypertense patients that have not been treated, in order to establish its diagnostic utility, raising the need for future longitudinal studies to determine the prognostic value of the intima-media thickness. Source:Asociación RUVID These results show the usefulness of campaigns such as the May Measurement Month, supported on an international level by the International Society of Hypertension (ISH). From Spain, for the edition of the current year 2019 of the MMM, once again under the coordination of the SEH-LELHA, we are trying to expand the assessed population, with cases from more universities and community chemists of the SEFAC (Spanish Family and Community Chemistry Society), but also of mutual labour insurance companies, entities of Primary Attention and other medical specialities, and among groups of patients.”last_img read more

Monsanto CEO and others to leave after Bayer takeover

Citation: Monsanto CEO and others to leave after Bayer takeover (2018, May 7) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-monsanto-ceo-bayer-takeover.html Monsanto Chairman and CEO Hugh Grant will leave the company after it’s acquired by Germany’s Bayer AG. The St. Louis company said Monday that Grant will work to see the $57 billion deal through and oversee operations before it closes. Bayer expects the deal to close in the second quarter.A number of Monsanto’s top executives will depart with Grant as well.Monsanto shareholders approved a bid from the pharmaceutical and chemical business in December.Monsanto sells seeds and crop protection chemicals to the agricultural sector. Monsanto shares jump on report of US approval of Bayer deal This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. read more

Sensor stickers transform the human body into a multitouch surface

Sensors now make it possible to capture touches on the body very precisely, even from multiple fingers. Researchers have successfully tested a new prototype sensor in four different applications. Provided by Saarland University “The human body offers a large surface that is easy to access, even without eye contact,” said Jürgen Steimle, a professor of computer science at Saarland University, explaining the researchers’ interest in this literal human-computer interface. The development was challenging because the such sensors could not measure touches precisely enough, nor could they capture them from multiple fingertips simultaneously. The prototype sensor, named Multi-Touch Skin, looks similar in structure to the touch displays that are well known from smartphones. Two stacked electrode layers, each arrayed in rows and columns, form a kind of coordinate system, at whose intersections electrical capacitance is constantly measured. Capacitance is reduced at the point where fingers touch the sensor, because the fingers conduct electricity and therefore allow the charge to drain away. These changes are captured at each point, and thus touches from multiple fingers can be detected. In order to find the optimal balance between conductivity, mechanical robustness and flexibility, the researchers evaluated different materials. Silver was chosen as the conductor, PVC plastic for the insulating material between the electrodes, and PET plastic for the substrate; the sensor could be printed using a household inkjet printer in less than a minute.”So that we could really use the sensors on all parts of the body, we had to free them from their rectangular shape. That was an important aspect,” explains Aditya Shekhar Nittala, who is doing his doctoral research in Jürgen Steimle’s group. The scientists therefore developed software for designers to create their own desired sensor shapes. In the program, the designer first draws the outer shape of the sensor, then outlines the area within this outer shape that is to be touch-sensitive. A special algorithm then calculates the layout that will optimally cover this defined area with touch-sensitive electrodes. Finally, the sensor is printed.The usefulness of this new freedom of form is demonstrated in one of the four test prototypes, each of which the scientists produced with their novel fabrication method. It was designed to fit a test participant’s right ear. The subject could swipe upward or downward in order to use it as a volume control. Swiping right or left changes the song being played, while touching with a flat finger stops the song.For the Saarbrücken scientists, Multi-Touch Skin is further proof that research into on-skin interfaces is worthwhile. In the future, they want to focus on providing even more advanced sensor design programs, and to develop sensors that capture multiple sensory modalities. Citation: Sensor stickers transform the human body into a multi-touch surface (2018, May 7) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-sensor-stickers-human-body-multi-touch.html Mobile on-body devices can be precisely and discreetly controlled using a tiny sensor This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Saarbruecken computer scientists have developed novel skin sensors that allow mobile devices to be controlled from any point on the body. Credit: Saarland University Explore further read more

Ryanair threatened by summer strike

first_imgUnions representing Ryanair cabin crew based in Spain, Portugal, Belgium and Italy said Monday they would go on strike this summer unless the low-cost airline accepts their demands by a June 30 deadline. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 AFP Ryanair profits up 10% despite cancellations crisiscenter_img Airline company Ryanair could face strike action on European routes over the summer Citation: Ryanair threatened by summer strike (2018, May 28) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-ryanair-threatened-summer.html After a meeting in Madrid, the unions reiterated demands that Ryanair staff be employed according to the national legislation of the country they operate in, rather than that of Ireland as is currently the case, Spain’s USO union said in a statement.They also asked that the airline give contractors the same work conditions as its own employees.Finally, they demanded that Ryanair recognise unions for pilots and cabin crew and that it negotiate with a representative chosen by the unions and not the company. So far, the airline has only recognised two unions—Britain’s Balpa pilots’ union and Italy’s Anpac, which represents pilots and cabin crew.”If Ryanair refuses to meet these demands, and setting June 30 as a deadline, the unions will start all necessary procedures to mobilise at a European level for the summer, including calling a strike,” USO said.Antonio Escobar, from Spain’s Sictpla union that represents part of Ryanair’s crew, told AFP another meeting would take place on July 3 and 4 in Dublin if the airline refuses to accede to their demands, in which they will announce a date for a strike.The airline was not immediately available for comment.last_img read more

New app offers interactive experiences for Disney guests

first_img Citation: New app offers interactive experiences for Disney guests (2018, June 29) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-app-interactive-disney-guests.html Explore further With the opening of Toy Story Land at Hollywood Studies, Walt Disney World is also offering guests a new mobile app called Play Disney Parks. The app debuts Saturday, the same day that Toy Story Land opens to the public.Entertainment options include interactive themed games, Disney trivia, digital achievements and music playlists.Scott Andress is vice president of Digital Guest Experience for Disney. He explains that the app is designed to give people an alternative to a “heads down” cellphone experience. The idea is to turn wait times for rides into engaging entertainment for families and friends. It is available for iOS and Android platforms. It is free to download and use.The app can be used at the four parks just outside Orlando and two at Disneyland Resort. Want to see Disneyland without going there? Try Street View © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

UK fracking firm produces first shale gas

first_img Citation: UK fracking firm produces first shale gas (2018, November 2) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-uk-fracking-firm-shale-gas.html Cuadrilla’s Preston New Road drilling site near the village of Little Plumpton in northwestern England last month © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. UK fracking firm Cuadrilla pauses drilling after tremorcenter_img Explore further UK energy company Cuadrilla said Friday it has extracted a small but “encouraging” amount of shale gas for the first time since resuming fracking in Britain less than three weeks ago. The 11-year-old private firm has borne the brunt of protests for trying to test whether fracking—a process in which water and chemicals are used to blast apart rock formations—can unlock natural gas deposits in the UK.The method has transformed the global energy market but is only developing slowly in Europe.Cuadrilla released a 12-second clip showing a bright yellow flame light up inside one of the chimney-like structures that stand over a web of pipes drilled deep into the ground.The gas flare was Cuadrilla’s evidence that fracking at the site was possible. The company said the question now was whether the entire process was commercially viable.”The volumes of gas returning to surface at this stage are small,” Cuadrilla chief executive Francis Egan said in a statement.”However it provides early encouragement that the Bowland Shale can provide a significant source of natural gas to heat Lancashire and UK homes and offices and reduce our ever growing reliance on expensive foreign imports.”Cuadrilla produced small amounts of shale gas at the same site in 2011. It was then forced to halt operations because two small earthquakes were soon registered in the northwestern part of England where its operations are based.It resumed work on October 15 after adopting more stringent safety and regulatory measures that environmentalists said were still insufficient.The company has since been forced to briefly halt drilling on three occasions because minor tremors began being detected deep underground.Cuadrilla stressed at the time that none of them could either be felt or cause physical damage on the surface.”This Preston New Road site is being monitored to an unprecedented level,” Egan said in Friday’s statement.”If we are able to fully test these wells, without compromising on safety, we have the potential to make a major difference to UK energy supply, security and economic prosperity.”The company said on its website that its tests from 2011 suggest that it can produce 6.5 billion cubic feet (185 million cubic metres) of gas from the Bowland Shale well over 30 years.last_img read more

Wheres the bus UW students new web tool tracks transit through the

first_img Explore further ©2019 The Seattle Times Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. University of Washington junior Kona Farry has, so he built a website, that lets transit users to track the whereabouts of all the buses, ferries, streetcars and light-rail trains in service in the Seattle region.The goal is to provide more real-time transit information to riders.His website, called the Puget Sound Transit Operations Tracker—or P-Track for short—uses GPS and other data publicly available from local and regional transit agencies to plot the positions of buses, trains and ferries along their routes.His page automatically updates every 30 seconds so users have up-to-date information.”It was born out of a desire to be able to see all the buses all at once and know what’s going on with the system,” said Farry, 21, who studies community, environment and planning at UW.For hard-core transit enthusiasts, information about each vehicle’s make and model, unique identification number, and even the size of the vehicle is available in the website.The site is free, and Farry does not make money off it. But users can support his work by making a one-time contribution or paying for a monthly subscription that supports ongoing development and server costs.P-Track differs from other transit trackers like King County Metro’s OneBusAway in that riders can see how individual buses are moving along a route as opposed to getting an estimate of when the bus will arrive. It also says whether a bus or train is running behind or ahead of schedule.For example, if you’re waiting for a bus on Third Avenue downtown, you can use OneBusAway or the Transit App to see that your bus is scheduled to arrive in 4 minutes. Then, you can open up P-Track, input the route you are tracking and see that your bus is still making its way through Pioneer Square.That can provide riders with additional information: Your bus is on its way, but it might take 5 or 6 minutes to get to your stop, not 4 as the other apps might say.”If a bus misses a light cycle or hits traffic, suddenly that estimate is off by several minutes,” Farry said. “You don’t watch that number slowly tick upward. You get a much better feel when you can say, ‘Oh the bus is right there, but it’s not moving. That’s why it’s not here yet.’ ” Credit: CC0 Public Domain Math explains why your bus route seems so unreliable On his site, Farry considers a bus on-time if it arrives between 2 minutes early and 5 minutes late. That’s the same as Metro’s definition.The website also can tell you how often buses on a particular route are late, very late, on time or early. Late buses are those that arrive between 5 and 15 minutes after they are expected. Very late buses come more than 15 minutes later than scheduled, and early buses come more than 2 minutes sooner than scheduled.Farry started working on the idea in December and, with limited coding experience, developed the website in less than four months, he said. He tapped Google, people on various internet forums and his roommate, a computer-science major, to help build the system.”I pretty much had to learn everything as I went,” he said.Farry said he became a self-described “transit geek” in the fall of 2016 when he moved from Marysville to Seattle for school and got to thinking about how to make transit work better.”That opened up this whole new world of riding the bus and going places for me,” he said. “I thought it was fascinating how there were so many buses out there going all over the city.”He regularly takes Metro’s Route 45, which runs between Loyal Heights and the University of Washington light-rail station. Farry also rides the Sound Transit Express Route 512 to Everett, where he then switches buses to get home to Marysville. And he sometimes rides Community Transit commuter buses between Snohomish and King counties.Over the summer, he plans to develop the website into an app for Apple phones. Android users could continue to view the platform on their mobile browser.In future versions, he’d like to add a traffic overlay so riders can see traffic conditions that could delay their trip.Farry would also like to collect timeliness information over time so passengers can see which routes tend to be early or late. Citation: Where’s the bus? UW student’s new web tool tracks transit through the Seattle region (2019, April 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-bus-uw-student-web-tool.html Have you ever run to a bus stop just in time for its scheduled arrival only to end up waiting for the bus to show up? This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Men Notice Messes As Much As Women Heres Why They Dont Clean

first_imgOn a typical day, men spend a third as much time cleaning as women. Does that make women beacons of cleanliness, while men are genetically unable to see the messiness in their midst? This myth is a common explanation for why men don’t do as much housework as women. Men walk into a room and apparently can’t see the dust bunnies gathering on the floor or the piles of laundry stacked up on the couch.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65875-why-men-do-less-housework.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  It lets men off the hook for not doing their fair share of the household cleaning. But in a recent study we show that men aren’t dirt-blind — they can see mess just as well as women. They are simply less severely penalized for not keeping their spaces neat and tidy. Chore inequality Despite massive gains in education and employment, women still shoulder a larger share of the housework than men. Women today spend, on average, roughly an hour and 20 minutes per day cooking, cleaning and doing laundry. About a third of that is just spent cleaning. Men, on the other hand, spend about half an hour performing these duties — and only 10 minutes scrubbing and tidying. This household chore inequality is evident over time, across professions and even when women work longer hours and make more money. Even in Sweden, where government policies are strongly geared toward promoting gender equality, women do more housework. Swedish women do two times as much daily housework than men even though women are much more likely to work full-time than in other countries. Naturally, the more time spent on chores, the less a woman has to spend on other activities like sleep, work and leisure. The same mess In our study, which was recently published in Sociological Methods and Research, we asked 327 men and 295 women of various ages and backgrounds to assess a photo of a small living room and kitchen area. By random assignment, some participants rated a photo of the room looking cluttered — dirty dishes on the counter, clothing strewn about — while others examined a much tidier version of the same room. All participants looked at the one photo they were given and then rated how messy they thought it was and how urgently it needed cleaning. The first thing we wanted to know was whether men and women respondents rated the rooms differently. Contrary to popular lore, men and women saw the same mess: They rated the clean room as equally clean and the messy room as equally messy. Differing expectations So if “dirt blindness” isn’t to blame, why do women do more housework? One argument is that social expectations are different for men and women. Women may be judged more harshly for having a less-than-spotless home, and women’s awareness of these expectations may motivate them to do more. We tested this idea by randomly telling participants that the photo they were looking at depicted either “John’s” or “Jennifer’s” living space. Then we asked them to rate Jennifer’s or John’s character — how responsible, hardworking, neglectful, considerate and likable they were — based on the cleanliness of their home. We also asked participants to assess the extent to which she or he might be judged negatively by unexpected visitors — extended family, bosses and friends — and how much responsibility they believed Jennifer or John would bear for housework if they were working full-time and living alone, working full-time and married with children, or a married, stay-at-home parent. This is where things got interesting. Participants rated the photos differently depending on whether they were told that a woman or a man lived there. Notably, respondents held higher standards of cleanliness for Jennifer than they did for John. When they were told the tidy room belonged to Jennifer, participants — regardless of gender — judged it less clean and more likely to inspire disapproving reactions from guests than when the same exact room was John’s. We’ve all heard ‘men are lazy’ Still, we did find that both men and women pay a large penalty for having a cluttered home. Compared to their tidier counterparts, both Jennifer and John received substantially more negative character ratings and were expected to garner much more negative judgments from visitors. Interestingly, John’s character was rated more negatively than Jennifer’s for having a messy home, reflecting the common stereotype that men are lazy. Yet participants did not believe John would be any more likely than Jennifer to suffer negative judgment from visitors, which suggests that the “men are lazy” stereotype does not disadvantage them in a socially meaningful way. Finally, people were more likely to believe that Jennifer would bear primary responsibility for cleaning, and this difference was especially large in the hypothetical scenario in which she or he is a full-time working parent living with a spouse. That people attribute greater responsibility for housework to women than men, even regardless of their employment situation, suggests that women get penalized more often for clutter than men do. Judge not People hold women to higher standards of cleanliness than men, and hold them more responsible for it. Some women may internalize or embrace such standards. But for many, it is unlikely a love of cleaning but rather a fear of how mess will be perceived that is the real problem — and one possible reason why many women frantically clean their home before unexpected visitors arrive. The good news is that, with enough collective willpower, old-fashioned social expectations can be changed. We could start by thinking twice before judging the state of someone’s home, especially our own. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Reveals: “You Can Fill In Wrinkles At Home” (Here’s How)Beverly Hills MDUndoComparisons.orgDrivers Around California are Furious About This New RuleComparisons.orgGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoDirectExposeThis Baby Elephant Decided To Spend His Last Days Alongside This CreatureDirectExposeUndo Sarah Thebaud, Associate Professor, Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara; Leah Ruppanner, Associate Professor in Sociology, University of Melbourne, and Sabino Kornrich, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Emory Universitylast_img read more

Jawa Motorcycles dealerships

first_imgCOMMENTS Published on Jawa Motorcycles is aggressively strengthening its dealership network with plans to add another 35 and take the network to 100 plus across the country soon. The motorcycle major has roped in Classic Legends Pvt Ltd for expanding its footprints in Tamil Nadu with the opening of a showroom in Coimbatore recently, making it the fourth showroom in Tamil Nadu. It has forged tie-ups with new dealers in Tirupur, Salem and Trichy as well. COMMENT March 01, 2019 two-wheelers channels and franchises SHARE SHARE SHARE EMAILlast_img read more