Get in on the CBD Craze With These Tasty Gummies

first_img Add to Queue Get in on the CBD Craze With These Tasty Gummies –shares 3 min read Next Article Image credit: Entrepreneur Store Disclosure: Our goal is to feature products and services that we think you’ll find interesting and useful. If you purchase them, Entrepreneur may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners.There’s no denying the appeal of gummy bears: the childhood candy still makes a great treat during adulthood. There’s also no denying the market power of CBD-infused products: the cannabis extract is raking in millions of dollars for savvy entrepreneurs, and anecdotal reports about reduced anxiety, better sleep, and pain relief are pouring in from happy customers across the country.If you’re nervous to try CBD (or curious about the legality of this cannabis extract), there’s not much to be concerned about. There are thousands of CBD products out there that contain no psychoactive THC, and many states allow companies to openly sell and ship CBD-only products.Gummy CBD products are some of the most popular options around, partly for their nostalgic value and partly because they’re heartier than tinctures or lotions when it comes to shipping. JustCBD’s 500mg Gummies are a great example of a well-branded CBD-only product (and they’re a nice introduction to the world of hemp extracts if you’re looking to give it a shot yourself).These gummies are available as Sour Bears, Rainbow Strips or Apple Rings. Each serving contains about nine milligrams of hemp isolate powder, for a grand total of 500 mg of CBD per package. Each serving size is about two candies, but you can cut them into halves or quarters if you don’t need that much CBD. The hemp is grown and farmed in the U.S., and you won’t feel “high” on them since they don’t contain any THC. The sour and tart flavor combos are a treat for your tastebuds.JustCBD’s gummies are a great entry into the edible CBD market. They’re worth examining for their flawless combination of a fun childhood treat with an adult wellness trend. The gummies are also affordable enough for you to try a package on your own. They may even ease your back pain after a long commute or calm your nerves before an important client call.JustCBD’S 500mg CBD Gummies typically cost $40, but right now you can try any one of their three varieties for only $29.99 (25 percent off). Each week hear inspiring stories of business owners who have taken the cannabis challenge and are now navigating the exciting but unpredictable Green Rush. Entrepreneur Storecenter_img April 5, 2019 CBD Disclosure: Our goal is to feature products and services that we think you’ll find interesting and useful. If you purchase them, Entrepreneur may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. JustCBD’s 500mg CBD Gummies put an adult spin on gummy bears. Green Entrepreneur Podcast Listen Now Contributorlast_img read more

Why Get Dressed Up For Work When You Could Wear Bammies Business

first_img Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Register Now » Kim Lachance Shandrow Next Article Add to Queue Image credit: Bammies February 2, 2016 Bedwear has gone way beyond the bedroom, and, frankly it’s making us a little sleepy. “Dressy” sweatpants and nightgown-inspired “business” dresses are everywhere, from the runway to the courtroom to the boardroom. And now there’s Bammies (“Bammies = business + jammies.”), the latest brand to latch onto the tired fashion trend of lazily substituting pajamas for work clothes.You know it, sleepyheads: Nothing says business like a $150 elastic-waisted glorified bathrobe.At least that’s what Bammies co-founders Rosario Chozas and Julia Ford-Carther are banking on. The  Miami Beach, Fla.-based fashionista-entrepreneurs dreamed up the idea for their drowsy line of “business jammies” when deeply pondering the question: Why would you put on a business suit when you could stay warm and cozy in your pajamas instead?Image credit: BammiesRelated: How to Dress for a Business Meeting. Yes, Seriously. (Infographic)Our answer: Because you’re a professional. You’re going to the office. Not to a pajama party.Their answer: Because comfort and authenticity count for a lot, on- and off-the-clock. Oh, and also: Because sometimes you just gotta “Dress the f*ck out of your woman-ness.”“It’s really about being who you are an not being apologetic for that,” Ford-Carther told Racked Miami. “If you’re worried about how tight your skirt is, or that the waist is bunching up, or that your cleavage is out and you’re at a meeting or on a date, you’re not actually tuned into or conveying who you truly are if you’re worried about the message you’re sending.”For ladies only, Ford-Carther and Chozas’ new six-piece pjs-for-the-office collection is available for pre-order now and slated to launch on Feb. 19. It includes: a $179 sweatshirt-like bunchy black blazer, $130 super wide MC Hammer pants-reminiscent gaucho bottoms, a $90 boxy white sleeper T-shirt made from men’s dress shirt material (which pairs well with cut-off shorts, apparently) and, the jewel in the bohemian crown, a $150 snap-on kimono-style robe business “dress.”  Related: The Stars of Shark Tank on How to Dress for Success“Each piece allows you to easily dress for the various appointments you have in your day,” Bammies website copy reads, “from that breakfast meeting to the office to the networking cocktail to date night and beyond.”To be fair, the muted mix-and-match frocks appear pretty comfortable, featuring frumpy-chic silhouettes and flowing fabrics that “you could throw under a truck and put on that won’t be wrinkled,” as Chozas told Racked Miami. Not that you’d chuck these snoozy duds under a truck, but you might Rip Van Winkle all over your cubicle in them.Please don’t, even if the ultra-casual businesswear “revolution is now elasticized.”Related: Pajamas That You Can Wear to Work? This Startup Wants to Be the Lululemon of Sleepwear.center_img Why Get Dressed Up For Work When You Could Wear Bammies, ‘Business Jammies’? Former West Coast Editor 3 min read Fashion Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. –shareslast_img read more

Eye scan shows promise to diagnose central nervous system disorders

first_img“The first concrete results from this project are not expected until the first quarter of 2019 but preliminary investigations are highly promising and suggest that we will be able to obtain high-resolution data about the structure of the retina in future and information about its molecular composition,” says Rainer Leitgeb, Project Leader from the Center for Biomedical Physics at the Medical University of Vienna.  Molecular look into the human eye To achieve this, the research team are using a combination of several complementary optical techniques, which provide detailed information about the condition of the eye tissue: highly sensitive molecular Raman spectroscopy is combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT). In a matter of seconds, this produces high-resolution images from all layers of the retina – including all the information about their molecular composition. Using this data, it will be possible, in future, to make a definitive diagnosis and detect neurodegenerative diseases at an early stage. “The earlier, the better the patient’s chances are,” emphasises Leitgeb. “It would be wrong to anticipate the results. But one thing is clear: it is possible to take a molecular look into the human eye.”  Related StoriesResearchers map full-body muscular activity of Hydra during movementProtein found in the eye can protect against diabetic retinopathy’Eye-in-a-dish’ model helps scientists to uncover ‘surprising’ AMD gene variantAnd it is quicker and less invasive than ever before: “Neurodegenerative diseases not only damage the brain but also cause changes in the retina. With our technique, which operates with light, we no longer need to look into the brain. Our goal is for a patient to be able to sit in front of the equipment, have their eye scanned contact-free and be given a reliable diagnosis in only a few minutes,” explains the MOON project leader from Vienna.  Experts estimate that the number of people worldwide affected by neurodegenerative diseases will double over the next 30 years, which would be a huge burden for the healthcare system. “However, if we can delay the onset of Alzheimer’s by five years, this is not only a huge benefit to sufferers and their families but would also save resources on intensive treatment. Here we are talking about billions of euros. The focus of our research therefore mirrors the strategic direction of Horizon 2020: we are working on the solution to a huge societal challenge.”  Source: https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/en/about-us/news/detailsite/2018/news-im-september-2018/eye-scan-a-promising-option-for-early-detection-of-central-nervous-system-disorders/ Oct 12 2018Partners from Austria – represented by Medical University of Vienna – Germany, France and the Netherlands are taking part in the EU “MOON” project (multimodal optical diagnostics for age-related diseases of the eye and central nervous system) to develop new techniques for early diagnosis of these diseases and successfully apply them in treatment and diagnosis. Around 18 months after the start of “MOON”, researchers are confident that, in future, it will be possible to use an “eye scan” to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer’s or to detect aggressive forms of age-related macular degeneration at an early stage – based on structural and molecular tissue changes on the retina.  last_img read more

Providing minimal assistance can take emotional toll on older caregivers

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 23 2019Providing less than an hour of help to an elderly person can take a surprising emotional toll on older caregivers, says a University of Michigan researcher.Caregivers 60 and older who provide “marginal” assistance–spending up to an hour helping often with just one activity–report worse well-being than those who help two hours a day handling various activities, according to Vicki Freedman, research professor at the U-M Institute for Social Research.Freedman and colleagues said the finding is counterintuitive to well-established thinking that caring for more hours poses a greater psychological burden on family and other unpaid caregivers.”It may be that these marginally involved caregivers find it harder to incorporate care into their busy lives,” Freedman said. “Or it could be those with worse well-being are less able to take on a more substantial caregiving role.”Caregivers perform various tasks such as household chores (preparing meals, laundry), personal and medical care (bathing, dressing, giving medicine), companionship and transportation (running errands or trips to doctor’s office).Related StoriesSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchOlympus launches next-generation X Line objectives for clinical, research applicationsResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyThe U-M study is novel because it considers both what caregivers do and when in the day they do it, Freedman said. Unlike previous research that tracks less granular responses over longer periods, such as the past month, the study uses 24-hour time diary data to explore if there are distinctive care patterns throughout the day affecting caregivers’ well-being.”We were able to see five distinct care patterns, including a large number of days on which caregivers were marginally involved,” Freedman said.Other days consisted of a mixture of care activities for about two hours; more substantial amounts of care, especially with household chores and transportation; and persistent care throughout the day, either with transportation and companionship or with household chores.The data came from the national Panel Study of Income Dynamics at U-M, which began in 1968 and is the longest running longitudinal household survey in the world. The sample consisted of 511 diary days with at least one reported care activity from adults 60 and older.For each activity on the previous day, respondents reported details about what they did, including how long they did it. They also responded to questions about how they felt (well-being)–calm, happy, sad, frustrated or worried–during randomly selected activities.On average, older caregivers spent just over two hours helping on days they assisted adults with daily activities. The time of day was not as important as the type of care in shaping well-being, the researchers said.​Source: https://umich.edu/last_img read more

Monsanto CEO and others to leave after Bayer takeover

Citation: Monsanto CEO and others to leave after Bayer takeover (2018, May 7) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-monsanto-ceo-bayer-takeover.html Monsanto Chairman and CEO Hugh Grant will leave the company after it’s acquired by Germany’s Bayer AG. The St. Louis company said Monday that Grant will work to see the $57 billion deal through and oversee operations before it closes. Bayer expects the deal to close in the second quarter.A number of Monsanto’s top executives will depart with Grant as well.Monsanto shareholders approved a bid from the pharmaceutical and chemical business in December.Monsanto sells seeds and crop protection chemicals to the agricultural sector. Monsanto shares jump on report of US approval of Bayer deal This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. read more

Ryanair threatened by summer strike

first_imgUnions representing Ryanair cabin crew based in Spain, Portugal, Belgium and Italy said Monday they would go on strike this summer unless the low-cost airline accepts their demands by a June 30 deadline. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 AFP Ryanair profits up 10% despite cancellations crisiscenter_img Airline company Ryanair could face strike action on European routes over the summer Citation: Ryanair threatened by summer strike (2018, May 28) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-ryanair-threatened-summer.html After a meeting in Madrid, the unions reiterated demands that Ryanair staff be employed according to the national legislation of the country they operate in, rather than that of Ireland as is currently the case, Spain’s USO union said in a statement.They also asked that the airline give contractors the same work conditions as its own employees.Finally, they demanded that Ryanair recognise unions for pilots and cabin crew and that it negotiate with a representative chosen by the unions and not the company. So far, the airline has only recognised two unions—Britain’s Balpa pilots’ union and Italy’s Anpac, which represents pilots and cabin crew.”If Ryanair refuses to meet these demands, and setting June 30 as a deadline, the unions will start all necessary procedures to mobilise at a European level for the summer, including calling a strike,” USO said.Antonio Escobar, from Spain’s Sictpla union that represents part of Ryanair’s crew, told AFP another meeting would take place on July 3 and 4 in Dublin if the airline refuses to accede to their demands, in which they will announce a date for a strike.The airline was not immediately available for comment.last_img read more

Men Notice Messes As Much As Women Heres Why They Dont Clean

first_imgOn a typical day, men spend a third as much time cleaning as women. Does that make women beacons of cleanliness, while men are genetically unable to see the messiness in their midst? This myth is a common explanation for why men don’t do as much housework as women. Men walk into a room and apparently can’t see the dust bunnies gathering on the floor or the piles of laundry stacked up on the couch.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65875-why-men-do-less-housework.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  It lets men off the hook for not doing their fair share of the household cleaning. But in a recent study we show that men aren’t dirt-blind — they can see mess just as well as women. They are simply less severely penalized for not keeping their spaces neat and tidy. Chore inequality Despite massive gains in education and employment, women still shoulder a larger share of the housework than men. Women today spend, on average, roughly an hour and 20 minutes per day cooking, cleaning and doing laundry. About a third of that is just spent cleaning. Men, on the other hand, spend about half an hour performing these duties — and only 10 minutes scrubbing and tidying. This household chore inequality is evident over time, across professions and even when women work longer hours and make more money. Even in Sweden, where government policies are strongly geared toward promoting gender equality, women do more housework. Swedish women do two times as much daily housework than men even though women are much more likely to work full-time than in other countries. Naturally, the more time spent on chores, the less a woman has to spend on other activities like sleep, work and leisure. The same mess In our study, which was recently published in Sociological Methods and Research, we asked 327 men and 295 women of various ages and backgrounds to assess a photo of a small living room and kitchen area. By random assignment, some participants rated a photo of the room looking cluttered — dirty dishes on the counter, clothing strewn about — while others examined a much tidier version of the same room. All participants looked at the one photo they were given and then rated how messy they thought it was and how urgently it needed cleaning. The first thing we wanted to know was whether men and women respondents rated the rooms differently. Contrary to popular lore, men and women saw the same mess: They rated the clean room as equally clean and the messy room as equally messy. Differing expectations So if “dirt blindness” isn’t to blame, why do women do more housework? One argument is that social expectations are different for men and women. Women may be judged more harshly for having a less-than-spotless home, and women’s awareness of these expectations may motivate them to do more. We tested this idea by randomly telling participants that the photo they were looking at depicted either “John’s” or “Jennifer’s” living space. Then we asked them to rate Jennifer’s or John’s character — how responsible, hardworking, neglectful, considerate and likable they were — based on the cleanliness of their home. We also asked participants to assess the extent to which she or he might be judged negatively by unexpected visitors — extended family, bosses and friends — and how much responsibility they believed Jennifer or John would bear for housework if they were working full-time and living alone, working full-time and married with children, or a married, stay-at-home parent. This is where things got interesting. Participants rated the photos differently depending on whether they were told that a woman or a man lived there. Notably, respondents held higher standards of cleanliness for Jennifer than they did for John. When they were told the tidy room belonged to Jennifer, participants — regardless of gender — judged it less clean and more likely to inspire disapproving reactions from guests than when the same exact room was John’s. We’ve all heard ‘men are lazy’ Still, we did find that both men and women pay a large penalty for having a cluttered home. Compared to their tidier counterparts, both Jennifer and John received substantially more negative character ratings and were expected to garner much more negative judgments from visitors. Interestingly, John’s character was rated more negatively than Jennifer’s for having a messy home, reflecting the common stereotype that men are lazy. Yet participants did not believe John would be any more likely than Jennifer to suffer negative judgment from visitors, which suggests that the “men are lazy” stereotype does not disadvantage them in a socially meaningful way. Finally, people were more likely to believe that Jennifer would bear primary responsibility for cleaning, and this difference was especially large in the hypothetical scenario in which she or he is a full-time working parent living with a spouse. That people attribute greater responsibility for housework to women than men, even regardless of their employment situation, suggests that women get penalized more often for clutter than men do. Judge not People hold women to higher standards of cleanliness than men, and hold them more responsible for it. Some women may internalize or embrace such standards. But for many, it is unlikely a love of cleaning but rather a fear of how mess will be perceived that is the real problem — and one possible reason why many women frantically clean their home before unexpected visitors arrive. The good news is that, with enough collective willpower, old-fashioned social expectations can be changed. We could start by thinking twice before judging the state of someone’s home, especially our own. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Reveals: “You Can Fill In Wrinkles At Home” (Here’s How)Beverly Hills MDUndoComparisons.orgDrivers Around California are Furious About This New RuleComparisons.orgGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoDirectExposeThis Baby Elephant Decided To Spend His Last Days Alongside This CreatureDirectExposeUndo Sarah Thebaud, Associate Professor, Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara; Leah Ruppanner, Associate Professor in Sociology, University of Melbourne, and Sabino Kornrich, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Emory Universitylast_img read more