Cuomo’s goal is to take our weapons

first_imgI read with great interest the Jan. 9 editorial with regard to the re-certification of handguns. Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion One point of the Safe Act was totally overlooked because Gov. Andrew Cuomo was only interested in reducing the number of handguns in New York state.  This is the backdoor method he wanted in the first place. Anyone who does not re-certify their handgun, even though they may have met all the legal requirements previously, will now break the law.They also will have all their firearms confiscated including: handguns, hunting, target, skeet, self defense and antique collectible guns. This act could turn law-abiding citizens into criminals and does nothing to remove firearms from the hands of actual criminals. Don’t be fooled by Gov. Cuomo pledging to make New York a safer place by removing legal firearms in New York. Don ReinhartTown of Root More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18Cuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccinelast_img read more

Workers comp still needs to be reformed

first_imgOn April 29, The Daily Gazette ran a story on changes to the New York state workers compensation system. Having a ringside seat to all the changes made to the comp system over the last decade, I agree with these changes. The doctors treating comp patients deserve more money and a lot less paperwork. Even though these changes are necessary, they are not the most pressing changes that need to be made to the comp system. The change that should be made is to do away with the workman compensation medical treatment guidelines.These guidelines make it impossible for an injured worker in New York to get the proper medical care.At the very least, remove the retroactive clause from the guidelines so injured workers with long-term injuries that need long-term care can get that medical care.That’s not what the state wants, though it wants to appear tough on comp fraud and business friendly. What the state has done is broken a system that wasn’t broken, making New York one of the most unsafe states in which to work. The comp board’s mission statement bears that out, stating in part “protecting the rights of injured employees while doing what is fair to employers.” Can anyone say “conflict of interest?”Last summer, the insurance company tried to deny me all my medical care for my work-related injury, as if I magically got better. If I hadn’t fought so hard, it would’ve gotten away with it. The guidelines and the judges favor the businesses and the insurance companies that represent them.In the end, I now pay for two medical treatments out of pocket for my work-related injury that are essential to my physical well-being. This should never happen with a work-related injury. Greg McDermottGansevoort More from The Daily Gazette:Police: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the…EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Stay on course

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For your information

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Casino operators cash in on gaming law change

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Aberdeen

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Two’s company

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Planning guidance review

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New York comes to Manchester

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‘We don’t want to be infected’: Indonesian crewmen plead to be airlifted home

first_imgHe said that the operator of the Diamond Princess was allowing its crew members to disembark, as long as their governments had made arrangements for their repatriation. He said that all passengers had left the ship by Tuesday, which left some 400 crew members on board.He begged President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo to rescue them, adding that the governments of the United States, Canada, South Korea and several European countries were planning to begin evacuating their nationals among the crew on Tuesday.”What is the government waiting for? Are they waiting for the remaining 69 of us to become infected?” said Masfud.On Feb. 5, Japanese authorities quarantined the Diamond Princess as well as its 3,711 passengers and crew for two weeks, docked in Yokohama, in an attempt to contain the spread of the virus. By the time the ship was released from quarantine on Feb. 19, however, 634 of all those aboard had tested positive for COVID-19.The Indonesian government had recently floated a plan to evacuate the remaining healthy Indonesians onboard, with officials saying that it might either send an aircraft or the Indonesian Navy’s Dr. Soeharso Hospital Ship on the humanitarian mission.However, Health Minister Terawan Agus Putranto said on Monday that Jakarta was negotiating with Tokyo on the evacuation options.While acknowledging the increasing number of infected aboard the cruise ship, Terawan said the government did not want to “make a rash decision” as regards the evacuation, stressing that it wanted to ensure that the evacuation would not spread the virus to the archipelago.Indonesia maintains that it has zero confirmed cases of COVID-19 to date, although a recent report about a Japanese man raised fear among the public that infections were going undetected. The Indonesian crewmen expressed their hope that the government would airlift them from the Diamond Princess. Sudiarta noted that if Jakarta decided to send a ship, they would have to wait another 14 days or so until it arrived in Yokohama.The crewmen’s main concern is that the probability of their becoming infected would increase the longer they stayed aboard.”We don’t want to become infected after previously testing negative,” Sudiarta emphasized.Indonesian crewman I Ketut Januartika agreed with Sudiarta, and reiterated the group’s hope that the government would send a plane to bring them home.“Anything could happen in the days we [have to] wait for a ship to get here,” he said.Januartika said he was willing to be quarantined again once they had arrived back in Indonesia. “If the government could come collect us by aircraft, I am ready for another quarantine. But please, don’t come get us by ship. It would take too long while we wait here,” he said.Topics : “Although we have tested negative [for COVID-19], we are worried because we are still on the cruise ship. We have yet to breathe fresh air,” said the father of two before continuing with a plea to the Indonesian government: “Please, evacuate us as soon as possible.”Masfud, who works as a chef de partie on the ship, said that morale was rapidly diminishing among all Indonesian crew that remained on the vessel, as they lived under the constant fear of contracting the virus as they waited for the government’s decision.The native of Surabaya, East Java, stressed that the vessel was “contaminated” with the coronavirus, which had been proven by the fact that the number of confirmed cases among the ship’s passengers and crew had continued to increase throughout the quarantine period.Masfud said that some of his colleagues had been healthy before, “but they were quarantined in the same cabin with a crew member who was showing certain symptoms, such as a high temperature”. Later, everyone in the cabin had tested positive for the virus. After working aboard the Diamond Princess throughout its 14-day quarantine in Yokohama, Japan, I Wayan Sudiarta was finally able to  breathe a sigh of relief over the weekend when he found that he had tested negative for COVID-19. The Feb. 24 records showed that 691 passengers and crew of the cruise ship had contracted the disease, which is caused by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that emerged in December 2019 in Wuhan, China.Although the 24-year-old felt lucky that he was not among the nine Indonesian colleagues who had contracted the virus, the negative test result did not allay the worries of Sudiarta and the 68 Indonesian crewmen who remain on the ship.last_img read more