Hot Women’s knockout semi-finals today

first_imgThe Jamaica Football Federation (JFF)-Sports Development Foundation (SDF) Women’s knockout semi-finals are on today at the Anthony Spaulding Sports Complex in Trench Town. In the first of the double header, many-time champions Barbican FC will face a stern test from Los Perfectos FC, starting at 3 p.m. Then in the second game, last year’s beaten knockout finalist Waterhouse FC, meet G.C. Foster College at 5:30 p.m. Spectators could be in for a treat as the four top teams in women’s football will be in action. Barbican have won the knockout trophy for the last six years and will be looking for another hold. However, they will face a tough opponent in Los Perfectos. “This is going to be an interesting clash,” Barbican’s long-serving coach, Charles Edwards, told The Gleaner yesterday. “They (Los Pefectos) have some players who we have played against and beaten while they were at other clubs. And they will certainly be coming to beat us,” Edwards said. “We have a quality team and have prepared well for this game. We will go there to execute our game plan,” headded. Barbican will be looking to captain Alicia James, Latoya Panton, Tashana Vincent, and Rochelle Bryan to take them into the final. Duane James, head coach of Los Perfectos, is fully aware of the strength and history of his opponent. “We have played well against Barbican over the years. We have the players and the firepower to compete with them this time,” James disclosed. James is relying on former national players such as Shakira Duncan, Venecia Reid, and Sasha Campbell to upset the strong Barbican team. The other game between Waterhouse and G.C. Foster should also be a competitive and close affair. Both teams met in the Women’s league group stage last month and the game ended in a 0-0 stalemate. Now, a winner must come from the game. So it could be down to the team that is better prepared for some gruelling football. WELL PREPAREDlast_img read more

TFA AGM Documents

first_imgAttached is further information in relation to the Touch Football Australia (TFA) Annual General Meeting (AGM).It includes:* Agenda* Previous Minutes* Nominations for DirectorsThe AGM will occur at 11am AEDST on Sunday, 14 December 2008 in Canberra.Related Filesstatement_of_claims_2008_noms-pdfagm_2008_agenda-pdflast_img

RBC added to Financial Stability Board list of 30 systemically important banks

first_imgTORONTO – The Royal Bank of Canada is the first Canadian lender to be added to the Financial Stability Board’s list of global systemically important banks, which are deemed too big to fail.The FSB, which co-ordinates the work of national financial authorities and international standard-setting bodies, added RBC (TSX:RY) as it removed French bank Groupe BPCE, keeping the total number of institutions on the list at 30.“This designation reflects the size and scale of RBC’s global operations,” RBC said in a statement Tuesday.Banks that receive this global systematically important (G-SIBs) designation face increased regulatory expectations designed to reduce the likelihood of a failure — and the ripple effects on the global economy. That includes a higher capital buffer and higher supervisory expectations.RBC is Canada’s largest bank based on its stock market value. However, because it is one of the smallest banks on the global list, RBC was placed into the lowest of five categories or “buckets” with the least onerous requirements to set aside additional capital to protect against unexpected losses.RBC and 16 other banks in this G-SIB category are required to hold an additional one per cent of common equity as a percentage of its risk-weighted assets, on top of the minimum capital levels outlined by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision.RBC says that it already meets the requirement of a one per cent capital buffer and “does not expect any impact to its capital position with this designation.”Eight banks, including Goldman Sachs, are subject to a 1.5 per cent buffer, and four banks including HSBC must hold two per cent. Only JP Morgan Chase must hold a 2.5 per cent buffer, and no bank is in the highest bucket with a 3.5 per cent requirement.The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions said in a statement Tuesday that RBC is already subject to its framework for domestic systematically important banks (D-SIBs), and “therefore is well positioned to meet the G-SIB requirements starting in January 2019.”Canada’s banking regulator in 2013 named the country’s six largest banks, including RBC, as D-SIBs. In turn, the banks were subject to additional requirements such as a capital surcharge, enhanced supervision, and increased disclosure, which OSFI says is generally consistent with the G-SIB requirements.Over the years, there has been “rampant speculation” that RBC would be included in this list and this “should not come as a big surprise to markets,” Cormark Securities analyst Meny Grauman said in a note to clients.“The question is what does that mean for investors, and in our view the likely answer is not much…. the G-SIB buffer will not be additive to its D-SIB buffer, but rather is already included.”CIBC World Markets analyst Robert Sedran said RBC’s possible inclusion had often been discussed at the time of FSB’s annual update “as the combination of currency translation and business growth made it a close call each time the list was released.”“It is not a stretch to suggest this bank has always been systemically important to the global financial system (at least a little),” Sedran said in a note to clients.“More important to us is the fact that management (in its language), the Board (as evidenced by the buyback activity) and the regulator (with its formal pronouncements) are comfortable that the domestic buffer can absorb the first level of the required global buffer and that the capital position is strong.”Sedran added that the lasting impact of the announcement on shares should be limited.Shares of RBC were flat, closing at $100.92 in Toronto.last_img read more

CHP may have used Tesla Autopilot to stop speeding car

first_imgREDWOOD CITY, Calif. — The California Highway Patrol says it may have used the Autopilot system of a Tesla to stop the car after its driver fell asleep.The CHP says officers attempted to stop the Tesla Model S, which was doing about 70 mph (113 kph) on a highway early Friday in the San Francisco suburb of Redwood City. After the driver didn’t respond to lights or sirens, the officers say they pulled alongside and realized he was asleep.They pulled in front and began slowing to a stop, hoping the Tesla’s driver-assist program was on and would do the same. Authorities say the tactic worked.Alexander Samek of Los Altos was awakened and arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence. It’s unclear whether he has a lawyer.Tesla hasn’t confirmed whether the car was using Autopilot.The Associated Presslast_img read more