Roche ready to make Tamiflu in US

first_imgSep 20, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Roche announced last week that its United States supply chain for oseltamivir (Tamiflu), used to treat avian influenza and seasonal flu patients, is fully operational, meaning all aspects of its production are based on US soil.The company said it now has the capability to produce 80 million treatment courses of the drug annually in the United States, which is stockpiling oseltamivir as part of efforts to prepare for a flu pandemic.The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) had asked Roche to establish a system that involves US sources for all phases of osteltamivir production, from synthesizing shikimic acid, the starting material, to packaging the medication, the company said in a news release.”The ability to produce Tamiflu from start to finish on US soil is a significant milestone that will help ensure access to Tamiflu when and where it is needed,” said George Abercrombie, president and chief executive officer for Hoffman-La Roche, Inc., the company’s US pharmaceutical division.The company said HHS has ordered 21.3 million treatment courses of oseltamivir for the Strategic National Stockpile, all of which will be delivered by the end of this year. Marc Wolfson, a spokesman for the HHS Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness in Washington, DC, verified that information for CIDRAP News.The long-term goal for the stockpile is 81 million courses by the end of 2008, according to Wolfson and Roche. Of that total, HHS says it will buy 50 million courses and will provide a 25% subsidy for states to purchase another 31 million courses.Roche says that with its own manufacturing network and 16 external contractors, it has more than enough capacity to meet the osteltamivir orders from 75 countries that are stockpiling the drug. Global annual production capacity will reach 400 million treatment courses by the end of this year, the company said.Approved for prevention and treatment of influenza in adults and children 1 year and older, osteltamivir is intended to treat influenza viruses in all clinical settings. It has been shown to be active against the H5N1 virus in the laboratory and in animals that are infected with an H5N1 avian flu strain taken from humans, according to Roche.See also:Sep 14 Roche press releasehttp://www.roche.com/med-cor-2006-09-14last_img read more

ConocoPhillips sells Greater Sunrise stake to Timor-Leste

first_imgConocoPhillips agreed to sell its 30 percent interest in the Greater Sunrise Fields to the government of Timor-Leste for $360 million.Proceeds from this transaction will be used for general corporate purposes, ConocoPhillips said in a statement.“Although we differ with the government on its proposed development plan for Sunrise, we recognize the importance of the field to the nation of Timor-Leste, and the sale of our interest to the government gives them a working interest in this important development,” said Matt Fox, executive vice president, strategy, exploration and technology, at Conoco Phillips.The transaction is expected to close in the first quarter of 2019.The sale gives the government of Timor-Leste interest in the Woodside-operated multi-billion Greater Sunrise LNG project that stalled due to the maritime border dispute between Timor-Leste and Australia.The project received a major boost in March this year when the two governments signed a treaty establishing permanent maritime boundaries as well as a framework to jointly develop the Greater Sunrise gas fields.The fields were discovered in 1974 and hold gross contingent resources of 5.13 Tcf of gas and 225.9 million barrels of condensate, according to Woodside.The Australian LNG player, together with its partners plans on developing the resources through the Sunrise LNG project.When the interest sale deal between ConocoPhillips and the government of Timor-Leste closes, partners in the Sunrise LNG project will include the operator Woodside with a 33.44 percent stake, Timor-Leste government (30 percent), Shell (26.56 percent) and Osaka Gas with a 10 percent stake.last_img read more

Mike Yardley: Cannabis uncertainty is a cop-out

first_imgNewsTalk ZB 8 July 2020Family First Comment: Another Mike on Newstalk ZB (Mike Yardley this time) nails it….“We already have an addiction-fueled mental health crisis in this country, much of which can be sheeted home to recreational cannabis abuse and psychosis. Why risk aggravating that problem even more, by normalising and legitimising dope, by surrendering on the law?”I have a major beef with this mealy-mouthed suggestion from the Chief Science Advisor’s panel that it’s still uncertain whether legalising dope increases harm.We already have an addiction-fueled mental health crisis in this country, much of which can be sheeted home to recreational cannabis abuse and psychosis. Why risk aggravating that problem even more, by normalising and legitimising dope, by surrendering on the law? There are so many unintended consequences, which I don’t believe this panel has fully considered.Let me give you an example of the elevated threat of real harm to you and me. Drug-driving.Last week the Road Transport Forum made their views very clear about the higher risks on our roads if recreational cannabis use is legalised. It raises the stakes on risk.And bear in mind, the number of people being killed by drug impaired drivers on our roads is already higher than those killed by drivers above the legal alcohol limit. Do we want to ratchet that up?Here’s some stats from various North American jurisdictions that legalised dope.Post-legalisation in Colorado, cannabis-related roads deaths increased 151%. In Washington State, they doubled. A quarter of Canadians aged 18-34 who smoke dope admit to driving after consuming, or have been a passenger with someone who just has. Idiots.In a 2018 Colorado State study, 27% of cannabis users admitted to driving high almost daily. And a New Zealand health study found that habitual users of cannabis have about 10 times the risk of causing a road injury or death compared to infrequent or non-users.Ding ding. I hear alarm bells.READ MORE: https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/mike-hosking-breakfast/opinion/mike-yardley-cannabis-uncertainty-is-a-cop-out/last_img read more