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first_img News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems August 28, 2013 — Medical software developer Blackford Analysis announced that picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) integrated with its automatic alignment technology deliver significant time savings when matching lung nodule locations across current and prior chest computed tomography (CT) exams. Preliminary results indicate a time saving of greater than 50 percent with automatic deformable alignment over manual alignment of current and priors.Lung nodules, a common finding in chest CT exams, are routinely followed by serial chest CT where the radiologist must assess individual nodules for change. Manually matching nodule location across exams is burdensome due to differences in pulmonary anatomy caused by variance in patient positioning and breath hold.The Stony Brook study, which will be published later this year, retrospectively identified 27 subjects from Stony Brook Medical Center with nodules in two chest CTs within three years. The study measured the time taken for board-certified radiologists to match each of the 112 nodules in prior exams to the same location in current exams in PACS using two volume alignment methods:Manual Rigid, where the radiologist synchronized scrolling manually at the most superior slice where air was visible in the right lung.Automatic Deformable, where Blackford Analysis’ PACS-integrated software performed automatic deformable alignment of current and prior chest CT exams.Preliminary results show that automatic deformable alignment provided by Blackford Analysis significantly reduces lung nodule location matching time when compared with conventional manual slice synchronization. Preliminary data has shown that automatic deformable alignment can reduce location match time by greater than 55 percent compared to manual alignment.“Lung nodule studies can be quite a challenge to compare due to the differences in pulmonary anatomy caused by variance in patient positioning and breath hold,” said Matthew A. Barish, M.D., FACR, clinical associate professor of radiology; director, body imaging; director, body MRI (magnetic resonance imaging); Stony Brook Medicine. “Using a PACS integrated with Blackford Analysis has made a clear difference to our ability to quickly identify nodule locations across exams, and our early data confirms a significant reduction in the time spent locating nodules in follow-up studies allowing for quick determinations of nodule stability or growth.”The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently issued a draft recommendation in favor of low-dose CT lung cancer screening for individuals aged 55-79 with at least a 30 pack year smoking history who currently smoke or quit within 15 years.“This data is particularly relevant in light of recent developments, as the USPSTF recommendation on lung cancer screening is going to have a big impact on radiologists across the United States,” said Ben Panter, CEO, Blackford Analysis. “Once a reimbursement code is issued, there will be a massive increase in low-dose chest CT screening studies for lung cancer, with an increasing number of priors to compare for change in lung nodules, which will present a significant increase in workload for radiologists, and that’s where our software can really help make a positive difference.”Designed to be seamlessly integrated into any PACS, the Blackford software suite uses algorithms to allow rapid alignment of current and prior cross-sectional exams, including those from different modalities such as CT, MRI and PET (positron emission tomography).For more information: www.blackfordanalysis.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Medical 3-D Printing | August 08, 2019 RSNA and ACR to Collaborate on Landmark Medical 3D Printing Registry The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) will launch a new medical… read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | August 28, 2013 Automatic Deformable Alignment Significantly Reduces Radiologist Time to Match Lung Nodule Locations Study data particularly relevant in light of USPSTF recommendation for low-dose CT screening for lung cancer The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Related Content Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read morelast_img

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