Luke Braid to captain Blues in place of injured Mealamu

first_img Ali Williams makes a welcome return for the BluesFlanker Luke Braid has been given the captaincy duties in the absence of Keven Mealamu for this weekend’s match against the Highlanders in Dunedin.“Luke was selected by his team-mates as the Player of the Year in 2011. He has a lot of respect within the team and that is reflected in his high work-rate and consistent on-field performance. He is a natural leader and we see him as a future captain,” said coach Pat Lam.A nerve injury to Rudi Wulf’s shoulder sees him join Mealamu on the injury list and some backline shuffling has taken place to cater for this. Hadleigh Parkes moves to fullback, Benson Stanley heads out to the wing and Rene Ranger will play at centre.Ali Williams returns to the starting line-up. “When you look at the players on the injury list this week as well as having Dan Braid on the bench, we are without a lot of senior players and leaders. We need Ali out there from first whistle this week.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – APRIL 11: Ali Williams looks for assistance during an Auckland Blues training session at Unitec on April 11, 2012 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Sandra Mu/Getty Images) Winger David Raikuna returns to the 22 after two weeks off with a hamstring problem. Starting XV:1. Tony Woodcock2. Tom McCartney3. Charlie Faumuina4. Ali Williams5. Filo Paulo6. Chris Lowrey7. Luke Braid ©8. Peter Saili9. Alby Mathewson10. Gareth Anscombe11. Benson Stanley12. Ma’a Nonu13. Rene Ranger14. George Moala15. Hadleigh ParkesReplacements:16. James Parsons17. Tevita Mailau18. Liaki Moli19. Dan Braid20. Piri Weepu21. Michael Hobbs22. David Raikunalast_img read more

U20 World Championship: New Zealand 64-17 England

first_img By Aaron TillyerNew Zealand beat England in emphatic style to become World Rugby U20 champions for an historic sixth time.The Baby Blacks racked up ten tries in their 64-17 demolition of last year’s winners, who failed to make any mark in the final at the Mikheil Meskhi Stadium in Tbilisi.New Zealand were far superior in a clinical attack, whereas handling errors and defensive frailties hampered any opportunities for England.Dalton Papali’i was first to cross for the Baby Blacks, winning a scrum against the head on England’s 22m line before diving over from close range.Line breached: Isaia Walker-Leawere finds a hole in England’s defence. Photo: Getty ImagesEngland’s defence was lacking in strength – something we’ve been so accustomed to seeing in the competition – and that allowed New Zealand to break through the middle and out wide.Prop Pouri Rakete-Stones capitalised on a break on halfway, touching down only a couple of phases later. In contrast, scoring opportunities for England were rare and when fly-half Max Malins missed a penalty after 12 minutes, things were looking bleak for the defending champions.Full-back Will Jordan and fly-half Stephen Perofeta continued to open up England’s defence and kept the scoreboard rolling. Further tries from Asafo Aumua (two), Isaia Walker-Leawere and captain Luke Jacobson gave the five-time winners a commanding lead. Champions: New Zealand’s Baby Blacks celebrate their U20 title in Georgia. Photo: Getty Images How New Zealand’s Baby Blacks secured a record sixth Junior World Cup title LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREA consolatory first-half try from Ben Earl offered England a little hope. A powerful Malins pass on the advantage line drew out three New Zealand defenders to give Earl an easy run-in, reducing the deficit somewhat to 40-7 at the break.England rang the changes in the early stages of the second half but New Zealand began as relentlessly as they had finished the first, Josh McKay racing over in the corner to increase the Kiwis’ lead.Quick thinking: Alex Mitchell scores from a tap penalty. Photo: Getty ImagesWhen England finally got some possession and began to attack in New Zealand’s half, a quickly tapped penalty by replacement Alex Mitchell allowed him to dive over for their second try, but a missed conversion from Malins underlined his out-of-sorts display.New Zealand’s hooker Aumua has been one of the standout players of the campaign and fittingly brought up his side’s half century with another finely worked try from short range. It was his third and he was subsequently brought off to a standing ovation.Tom Christie and Jacobson followed for New Zealand’s ninth and tenth tries of the game. England’s tank was running on empty, but not before Josh Bayliss touched down in the corner to end the campaign on a relative positive.Hat-trick hero: Hooker Asafo Aumua scored three tries. Photo: Getty ImagesEngland will be disappointed not have competed in the first half and, as France found out in their semi-final, chasing the game against New Zealand is no easy task.New Zealand were undoubtedly the best side in the competition and surely a number of these Baby Blacks will be in contention for the All Blacks come the 2019 World Cup in Japan. World Rugby U20 Championships final standings:New ZealandEnglandSouth AfricaFranceScotlandAustraliaWalesItalyIrelandGeorgiaArgentinaSamoa (relegated to U20 Trophy)last_img read more

A very big tent

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Rev Canon Nancy Platt says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing September 21, 2012 at 6:32 pm Thank-you for such a fine commentary. I too like the big tent so long as we seek Jesus Christ in all things. With regards to hymns (and being an organist), I have often wondered when our hymnody gatekeepers are going to give the people their music back – to create a Hymnal of such depth and accessibility that we will hear the roar of song each week. Yes, we need innovation, but not for the sake of innovation. I would love to see a standard Hymnal in our pews that has “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” and “Lift High the Cross” alongside “How Great Thou Art” and “Great Is Thy Faithfulness”. Give the people their hymnody back and we’ll see different numbers in the pews. Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Doug Desper says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] “O love, how deep, how broad, how high…”These words from a popular hymn have been pulsating in my mind for weeks.  As I would learn from Hymnal 1982, they were translated from 15th century Latin during the 19th century.  I recently visited a 19th century outpost of the Oxford Movement that contributed a more elaborate worship to our church.  Some would say it moved us more toward the Roman Catholic side of our history.I had an opportunity to worship at Grace and St. Peter’s Church in downtown Baltimore.  Having grown up Roman Catholic with vivid memories of pre-Vatican II liturgy, I felt nostalgic in the presence of incense, seeing the altar book moved from epistle to the gospel side, and the fiddleback chasuble.  I was a little surprised by hearing the Angelus sung after the dismissal when the altar party stopped in front of a statue of Mary.This was an Anglo-Catholic expression of the Episcopal Church I had only glimpsed elsewhere.  Most of my time in this denomination has been spent in the western United States where Anglo-Catholicism is rare.  Low church cassock and surplice-vested clergy leading worship is even rarer.But now, here I am in Maryland with parishes dating before the country was established.  That Sunday visit completed my experience of visiting our three downtown congregations.  And what I’ve been reflecting on was the real diversity of worship styles, especially how they reflect the great diversity of our denomination.Emmanuel Church is but three blocks away from Grace and St. Peter’s.  It has had a tradition of Morning Prayer and monthly celebration of Holy Communion.  Five blocks away is St. Paul’s—called Old St. Paul’s because of its 1692 founding—which is more “broad” church.  Only recently did this congregation add a third Sunday morning service using Rite II and a Holy Table facing the congregation.  The other two services are Rite I.Despite my nostalgia, I was put off at first by the Anglo-Catholic worship.  But as I observed other worshippers in the pews and the energy with which they sang their 1940 hymnal tunes, and the stories I later heard at coffee hour about the social ministries members were doing, I found myself appreciating our church’s diversity even more.  I’ve learned of the efforts made by so many in our church to hold in tension divergent views.  Now I was seeing the fruits of those fought to embrace widely different liturgical forms.There are those who take us to task for allowing such diverse expressions of worship within the same tent.  But what a gift to the Body of Christ that we are willing to be so different and yet remain members of the same denomination.“If the Anglican tradition has in any respect excelled,” writes Frederick Quinn in his book To Be a Pilgrim (Crossroad, 2001), “it has been in providing conditions that allow ordinary Christians to freely practice their devotional life and find a meaning to life, while functioning fully within the world.”  Also in this book, Quinn underscores the fact that many Anglo-Catholics were leaders in several movements that viewed the social gospel as essential ministry.  Another but less popular hymn came to mind as I reflected on my experiences.  It happened to be a favorite of my liturgy professor at the Seminary of Southwest or I probably would not have happened upon it.“Not here for high and holy things we render thanks to thee, but for the common things of earth…Awake, awake to love and work!…So let the love of Jesus come and set they soul ablaze, to give and give, and give again, what God hath given thee; to spend thyself nor count the cost; to serve right gloriously…”Those words can be prayerfully sung and loudly proclaimed regardless of the vestments, incense or lack thereof, whether we are in a beautiful stained-glass adorned neo-gothic building or a tent in the parking lot of a football stadium.We are a deep, wide and broad church indeed.— The Rev. Canon Dan Webster is canon for evangelism and ministry development in the Diocese of Maryland.  He makes his home in Baltimore. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab September 21, 2012 at 8:37 am Good morning it would seem from several comments I have heard here and elsewhere that some of the TEC is unaware that the AngloCatholic tradtion is alive and well jn the Midwest of Chicago, Milwaukee and especially Nashotah House. Those of us who were resident or trained there are more thsn familiar with incense the Angelus et al. Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID A very big tent Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Dan WebsterPosted Sep 20, 2012 Comments (2) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Video: Jane Cosby on working to find hope amid America’s…

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 18, 2013 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Episcopal News Service – Jackson, Mississippi] Episcopal Church Executive Council member Jane Cosby, from the Diocese of Pennsylvania, reflects on the important next steps after “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America,” a two-day gathering sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Mississippi at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Cosby, council’s liaison to its anti-racism committee, spoke Nov. 16 during a break in the meeting.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Video: Jane Cosby on working to find hope amid America’s racism Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Video This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 State of Racism, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

2 Anglicans elected to World Council of Churches executive committee

first_img Press Release Service By ACNS staffPosted Jul 5, 2016 Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Anglican Communion News Service] Two Anglicans will serve on the executive committee of the World Council of Churches, following elections last week at a meeting of the ecumenical body’s Central Committee in Trondheim, Norway.Dr. Agnes Abuom continues in her role as moderator of the WCC’s Central Committee. Abuom, a member of the Anglican Church of Kenya, made history when she was elected in 2013 because she was the first woman, and the first African, to hold the post.She will be joined on the executive committee by another Anglican, the Rev. Rex Reyes Jr., a member of the Episcopal Church in the Philippines and the general secretary of the National Council of Churches of the Philippines.Within the structures of the World Council of Churches, the assembly, which meets every seven years, has the mandate to review programs, to issue public statements and determine the overall policies of the WCC. It also elects its presidents and a Central Committee to oversee the WCC’s work until the next assembly.The Central Committee acts as the chief governing body of the WCC in-between assemblies. It meets every two years. The Central Committee elects an executive committee which meets twice a year.The executive committee, which meets twice a year, has fiduciary responsibility for the governance of the WCC and ensures implementation of the strategic objectives set by the Central Committee, oversees the finances of the council, approves the budget, monitors ongoing programmatic work, establishes personnel policies and appoints leadership staff.The new members of the WCC executive committee are:Dr Agnes Abuom,Moderator,Anglican Church of KenyaH.E. Metropolitan Prof Dr Gennadios of Sassima,Vice-Moderator,Orthodox, Greece, Ecumenical PatriarchateBishop Mary Ann Swenson,Methodist, USA, United Methodist ChurchBishop Petra Bosse-Huber,Evangelical Church in GermanyThe Revd Dr Festus Ambe Asana,Presbyterian Church in CameroonThe Revd. Dr Samson Olasupo Adeniyi Ayokunle,Nigerian Baptist ConventionDr Abba Haile Mariam Melese Ayenew,Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo ChurchPadi Rex R B Reyes Jr,National Council of Churches of the Philippines, Episcopal Church in the PhilippinesMs Emily Evans,Uniting Church in AustraliaThe Revd Dr Manhong Lin,China Christian CouncilThe Revd Dr Hyun JuBae,Presbyterian Church of KoreaThe Revd Dr Paul Gardner,Moravian Church in JamaicaArchpriest Mikhail Goundiaev,Russian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate)H.E. Metropolitan Serafim Kykotis,Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria and All AfricaH.E. Metropolitan Prof Dr Nifon of Targoviste,Romanian Orthodox ChurchBishop Simo Peura,Evangelical Lutheran Church of FinlandThe Revd Karin Van Den Broeke,Protestant Church in the NetherlandsThe Revd Martina Viktorie Kopecká,Czechoslovak Hussite ChurchThe Revd Cora Luisa Antonio Matamoros,Moravian Church in NicaraguaH.E. Metropolitan Zachariah Mar Nicholovos,Malankara Orthodox Syrian ChurchMrs Anne Glynn-Mackoul,Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the EastBishop John F White,African Methodist Episcopal Church, USAThe Revd Robina Winbush,Presbyterian Church, USAThe Revd Taaroanui Maraea,Maohi Protestant Church, French Polynesia People Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ecumenical & Interreligious, Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET 2 Anglicans elected to World Council of Churches executive committee Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

La Misión a los Marinos acoge a los extranjeros con…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Nota de la redacción: Este es el ultimo artículo de una serie continua acerca de congregaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal que llevan a cabo proyectos de agricultura comunitaria. Otros artículos de la serie pueden encontrarse aquí.Huerto para los marinos en Seattle[Episcopal News Service – Seattle, Washington] En un terreno que se acomoda junto al canal Duwamish, a la sombra de remolcadores y de una almacén de granos, se descubre un rincón improbable: ocho arriates de lechugas, tomates verdes y calabacines en plena floración.Hay una alfombra de virutas de madera. Hay una mesa de picnic y algunos bancos. Un cubo de abono orgánico se recuesta contra una cerca de malla. Al otro lado de la cerca crecen frambuesas silvestres que descienden en cascada hacia el canal donde los remolcadores pasan rumbo a su trabajo en el Puerto de Seattle.“Es espectacular aquí”, exclamó Ken Hawkins, director de Misión a los Marinos en Seattle una tarde reciente mientras los remolcadores sonaban sus bocinas y el tránsito por el puente West Seattle fluía continuo por encima.Johanna Padie, feligresa de la iglesia episcopal de Santa Margarita en Redmond, Washington, ayudó a comenzar el ministerio del huerto de la Misión a los Marinos en el puerto de Seattle. Foto de la Misión a los Marinos en Seattle vía Facebook.La idea de plantar hortalizas en un lote de terreno de la oficina de la Misión a los Marinos se les ocurrió a Hawkins y Johanna Padie, una simpatizante de los marinos proveniente de la iglesia episcopal de Santa Margarita [St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church] en Bellevue, Washington, durante una conversación en el otoño de 2013 sobre un mayor aprovechamiento para el ministerio del espacio de la Misión. El rincón de terreno en cuestión no era “más que un pedazo de tierra árido y gris”, dijo él.Surgió la idea de un huerto urbano y Hawkins se puso en contacto con Brian Sellers-Peterson, residente del área de Seattle y principal asesor del presidente de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo y un promotor de los proyectos de agricultura comunitaria de la Iglesia. Hawkins dijo que Sellers-Peterson y Padie hicieron posible el huerto.In 2104, un grupo de voluntarios construyó y cultivó seis arriates elevados para los cuales [la iglesia de] Santa Margarita donó los materiales. Ese año los arriates produjeron 1.000 raciones de hortalizas para los bancos de alimentos y albergues de la localidad. Unos voluntarios luteranos añadieron otros dos arriates en 2015. También el año pasado, empleados de Microsoft, cuya sede central se encuentra en la zona de Seattle, ayudaron en el mantenimiento general y regresarán este año el “día de la solidaridad” anual de United Way.Los voluntarios plantan hortalizas para los marinos visitantes, y hacen donaciones a una despensa de alimentos y a iglesias de la localidad. Otros voluntarios vienen a ayudar en el mantenimiento, como hace el grupo de estudiantes de secundaria de la iglesia episcopal de la Santa Cruz [Episcopal Church of the Holy Cross] en Redmond, Washington, que vinieron en un fin de semana reciente a escardar hierbas malas, a esparcir más virutas de madera, a podar el cercado y “a ayudarnos a seguir haciendo de este lugar un sitio de acogida”, dicho en palabras de Hawkins.Unos voluntarios llenan de tierra un arriate elevado en el huerto de la Misión a los Marinos en Seattle. Foto de la Misión a los Marinos en Seattle vía Facebook.Los arriates produjeron 2.000 raciones de alimento en 2015, dijo Hawkins, y antes en el día él le dijo a Episcopal News Service que los voluntarios habían cosechado entre 13 y 9 kilogramos de alimento. Este año los voluntarios plantaron los arriates de tomates pepinos, calabacines, berzas, acelgas y lechugas. La mayoría de los alimentos que no se les entregan a los marinos a bordo de sus barcos se envían al Banco de Alimentos de West Seattle, a unos cinco kilómetros al sur del huerto y un área de iglesias episcopales y luteranas.En 2016, dijo Hawkins, una conversación sobre la manera de compensar las emisiones de carbono de las iglesias que compraban flores para el altar que y venían de fuera de Estados Unidos llevó a unos voluntarios a plantar flores y bulbos en el centro. La Iglesia ahorró cientos de dólares al usar esas flores y gran parte del dinero retornó a los Marinos en la categoría de donaciones. En medio de todo el trabajo que conlleva, “edificamos la comunidad en la misión”, afirmó.El huerto es sólo parte del ministerio de la Misión a los Marinos. En funciones durante más de 40 años, el centro de Seattle ofrece servicios a bordo a unos 30.000 marinos y los voluntarios saludan se encuentran con empleados de cruceros cada verano. Algunos de esos empleados de cruceros viajan en una de las furgonetas de la misión desde el puerto hasta el centro de Seattle. Se les pide que donen $5 por el viaje (a diferencia de los $20 o más que les costaría un taxi) y las donaciones se revierten en el ministerio. Más de 10.500 tripulantes hacen uso del servicio durante el verano.La misión también ofrece servicios de capellanía y, en Navidad, los voluntarios cosen, llenan y distribuyen bolsas con artículos de aseo personal y un sombrero tejido a mano. Los marinos puede usar computadoras en el centro de la Misión a los Marinos de Seattle y también puede conectar sus propios aparatos a la internet a través del Wi-Fi del centro. Algunos voluntarios llevan teléfonos celulares y tarjetas telefónicas SIM de bajo costo a los marinos que no pueden abandonar su barco, de manera que puedan llamar a sus casas mientras están en puerto. Ellos también se ofrecen a hacerles cualquier compra necesaria a los marinos. La Misión a los Marinos de Seattle ha recibido a personas de más de 100 países. Un tercio de ellos proviene de las Filipinas y aproximadamente otro tercio, según Hawkins, de China, la India, Malaysia e Indonesia. Muchos de esos marinos han pasado semanas, meses e incluso años a bordo de sus bardos. A muchos de ellos las normas de la Seguridad Nacional de EE.UU. les dificultan el desembarco.El cuarenta por ciento de los empleos del [estado de] Washington depende del comercio internacional y esos empleos pagan un 25 por ciento más que los que participan en las manufacturas y el sector de servicio locales. Los marinos “lubrican las vidas de una de las ciudades más ricas de Estados Unidos y del mundo”, y no obstante viven fuera del radar de muchas personas, dijo Hawkins.“Son extranjeros en una tierra extraña cuando llegan aquí; son también extranjeros en su propia tierra (cuando regresan). Tenemos la oportunidad de acoger a esa gente y hacerle frente a la tradicional condescendencia de la misión que nos ha atormentado durante siglos”, afirmó. “No creo que puedas acoger verdaderamente a un extranjero si la condescendencia es parte esencial de tu actitud”.En la labor de la Misión a los Marinos “existe una oportunidad para nosotros de hacer un cambio en las vidas de las personas que sea tangible y yo creo que como cristianos e hijos de Dios estamos llamados a hacerlo”, afirmó.El trabajo voluntario en la Misión a los Marinos de Seattle con frecuencia es una actividad intergeneracional. Aquí se ve a dos voluntarios plantando en uno de los arriates elevados en mayo de 2015. Foto de la Misión a los Marinos de Seattle vía Facebook.Esa oportunidad de cambiar las vidas de las personas se presenta con una dicotomía, dijo Hawkins. “Salimos esperando cambiar la vida de alguien y lo que sucede es que somos transformados”, al encontrarnos con personas que son algunos de los obreros subvalorados de la economía global.Contando las 300 mujeres y unos cuantos hombres de todos los Estados Unidos que tejen sombreros para el programa de regalos de Navidad de la Misión a los Marinos de Seattle, el ministerio atrae a más de 400 voluntarios. “Creo que si podemos inspirar a 400 personas, eso es el poder de la evangelización”, dijo Hawkins.Esos voluntarios “ven el mundo a través de nuestros ojos de servicio, humildad y humanidad”, afirmó Hawkins, quien añadió que parte de la misión del ministerio consiste en “llevarnos al resto de la humanidad y llevar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas a estos lugares de manera que experimenten el mundo y a las otras personas en un ambiente verdaderamente maravilloso e inspirador”.Y ello podría tener “más que ver con la Iglesia del futuro que la mayoría de las estructuras que tenemos a través de la Iglesia Episcopal”, agregó.El puerto de Seattle es uno de los más de 200 puertos en 50 países donde ministra la Misión Internacional a los Marinos. Fundada en 1856, el ministerio tiene sus raíces en la Iglesia Anglicana y en la actualidad la reina Isabel II es su patrona.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Church-Community Agriculture Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 4, 2016 Rector Albany, NY La Misión a los Marinos acoge a los extranjeros con paz y con verduras Un huerto que brinda una nueva cosmovisión a marinos y voluntarios Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

Suheil Dawani elected primate of Anglican Province of Jerusalem and…

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Middle East Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Posted May 18, 2017 Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Israel-Palestine, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Suheil Dawani elected primate of Anglican Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop Suheil Dawani of the Diocese of Jerusalem has been elected as the next primate of the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East. He succeeds Archbishop Mouneer Hanna Anis, who has held the post since 2007.Full article. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

Home sought for buffalo hide symbolizing church’s commitment to indigenous…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Here is a close-up of the shell beading on our #ObjectoftheMonth, Powhatan’s Mantle, on display in our new Ashmolean Story gallery. Once thought to have been a cloak, it is now considered more likely that it was a wall hanging https://t.co/1mGhmqJ6KX pic.twitter.com/62Jcsr2bJm— Ashmolean Museum (@AshmoleanMuseum) June 6, 2018Clearly, the buffalo hide at the Episcopal Church Center is not Powhatan’s Mantle, but that was Chun’s inspiration when preparing this gift for Jefferts Schori.Chun, born in 1954 in Honolulu, was an indigenous studies scholar with degrees from colleges in Hawaii, New Zealand and Canada, and he wrote several books and articles about native Hawaiian culture, beliefs and practices. One of his projects was “Na ‘Euanelio Hemolele,” described by the Diocese of Hawaii as “a lectionary-size book containing the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, in the Hawaiian-language, complete with diacritical marks.”He was ordained a deacon in 2011 and a priest in 2012, but his involvement in the church’s indigenous ministries predated his ordination and included service on the Council on Indigenous Ministry, the Indigenous Theological Training Institute Board and the Anglican Indigenous Network.Chun died unexpectedly on Jan. 20, 2019, at age 64. His funeral was held the following month at the Cathedral of St. Andrew in Honolulu, where he had been named an honorary canon in 2018.“I counted Malcolm as a friend and a teacher,” Hawaii Bishop Robert Fitzpatrick said in a message to his diocese. “His service to the Cathedral, to the Diocese, to the Church, and to me will be warmly remembered.”Two Bulls, a Lakota originally from Red Shirt, South Dakota, was serving in the Diocese of Los Angeles more than a decade ago when he first met Chun, likely on one of Chun’s trips to Southern California on behalf of the Anglican Indigenous Network.The Rev. Malcolm Chun, seen in a Diocese of Hawaii video about the church’s history in Hawaii, was secretary general of the Anglican Indigenous Network when he gave the buffalo hide to Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in 2008.“He was just a great guy once you got to know him,” said Two Bulls, who recalled talking to Chun by phone a week before he died. “We were making plans to do some other work,” Two Bulls said, including producing a new issue of the Indigenous Theological Training Journal.Their partnership on the buffalo hide began when Chun acquired it from a “purveyor of such products” and asked Two Bulls to paint it, using Powhatan’s Mantle as his model. Two Bulls conducted some research on the original, including by contacting the museum. While aiming to stay true to the spirit of the original, he “took a little bit of artistic liberty,” such as his addition of color and placing a cross on the chest of the person depicted at the center of the hide.The hide, stretched out and tethered to the edges of a wooden frame, was presented to Jefferts Schori at a time when she, as presiding bishop, had been in discussion with Chun and others with the Anglican Indigenous Network about maintaining the church’s commitment to indigenous ministry, according to an Anglican Communion News Service article from 2008.Jefferts Schori, in an email to ENS, praised Two Bulls’ art as “always striking,” and she recalled his buffalo hide painting as “a powerful piece.”“It would be a gift to many if it were more widely seen,” she said. “I hope it doesn’t get lost.”A hardware store is moving into the space where the hide previously was on display at the Episcopal Church Center. Episcopal Church’s Chief Operating Officer Geoffrey Smith asked Hauff to look into finding an appropriate new home for it, and Hauff said the search continues.Two Bulls noted the piece is rather large, which could limit Hauff’s options, but he suggested a diocese like Oklahoma that has a vibrant indigenous ministry – or Virginia, given the history of Powhatan’s Mantle.“It is a teaching tool, so having it in a place where it can be viewed easily/widely would be first and foremost the main criteria for finding a place to house it,” Two Bulls told Hauff recently by email. “I am pretty sure that this would be what Malcolm would want.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Home sought for buffalo hide symbolizing church’s commitment to indigenous ministries Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN By David PaulsenPosted Mar 6, 2019 Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release [Episcopal News Service] The buffalo hide once on display at the Episcopal Church Center in New York is an imposing artifact, expansive enough to encompass native culture, artistic symbolism, bonds of faith, 400 years of American history and a decade-old connection between a presiding bishop and a Hawaiian Episcopal leader.The hide also is in need of a new home, displaced by construction to accommodate a new tenant in part of the Episcopal Church Center.“The concern is that it not end up in a place where it would [be] forgotten,” said the Rev. Brad Hauff, The Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries. He’s “pursuing a number of possibilities” for relocating the painted buffalo hide.That search for a new home comes as Episcopalians mourn the January death of the Rev. Malcolm Chun, the native Hawaiian who offered the hide as a gift to then-Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori in 2008, when Chun was secretary general of the Anglican Indigenous Network. Chun, whose funeral was Feb. 23, saw the hide as a symbol of the early English settlers’ colonial-era commitment to bringing Christianity to America’s native tribes, the Rev. Robert Two Bulls Jr. told Episcopal News Service.“Malcolm … was really just a big supporter of the Jamestown Covenant,” said Two Bulls, who serves the Episcopal Church in Minnesota as missioner for the Department of Indian Work. He also is the artist who painted the buffalo hide at Chun’s request.This buffalo hide was painted by the Rev. Robert Two Bulls Jr. to replicate the design of Powhatan’s Mantle, a 400-year-old relic made from deer skins and shell beadwork. Photo: Geoffrey SmithChun’s vision was to replicate Powhatan’s Mantle, said to have belonged to the chief who first welcomed the Jamestown settlers in 1607 in what today is Virginia. “I think this was his way of still keeping that connection alive,” Two Bulls said.The first Jamestown Covenant was a double-edged sword. For more than two centuries, America’s native peoples suffered a prolonged genocide at the hands of British colonists and their descendants, who saw the American Indians as “savages.” But those colonists also brought with them a mandate from King James I to preach the Christian Gospel to all they encountered in this “new world.”“Thus the Anglican commitment to preach and plant the true word of God among the American Indians was firmly established with the first permanent English settlement in America,” Owanah Anderson wrote in her 1988 book “Jamestown Commitment.” Anderson, who served as the church’s missioner for Native American and indigenous ministries, noted the most prominent early convert was Powhatan’s daughter, Pocahontas, who was baptized while “being held hostage aboard an English ship at anchor in the James River.”The church’s commitment was renewed nearly 400 years later with the signing of the New Jamestown Covenant in 1997, launching The Episcopal Church on a Decade of Remembrance, Recognition and Reconciliation. Jefferts Schori participated in a 2007 procession and Eucharist at the Jamestown historic site marking the start of a second decade affirming the covenant.The original Powhatan’s Mantle is on display at the University of Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology in England. Although it once was thought to be a cloak, it more likely was a wall hanging, according to the museum.It was made from four deer hides sewn together and decorated with white shell beadwork depicting a human figure flanked by two animals, likely a deer and a mountain lion or wolf. The more than 30 beaded circles may represent settlements and tribes, the museum says. Powhatan may have given it as a gift for King James I, according to one theory. It later ended up in possession of the 17th-century Englishman whose collection became the founding collection of the museum.One of Tradescant’s most famous additions to the founding collection was Powhatan’s Mantle http://t.co/yM43ZJXvPk pic.twitter.com/nB0u6gkKBd— Ashmolean Museum (@AshmoleanMuseum) August 4, 2015 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Indigenous Ministries Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

The Way of Love: with Bishop Michael Curry New podcast…

first_imgThe Way of Love: with Bishop Michael Curry New podcast coming June 2019 “The way of Jesus is the Way of Love. And the Way of Love can change the world.” Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted Jun 3, 2019 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Way of Love Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET “The way of Jesus is the Way of Love. And the Way of Love can change the world,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry says in his new podcast, The Way of Love: with Bishop Michael Curry, which launches on Pentecost [June 9]. These weekly conversations, featuring Bishop Curry along with podcast hosts Kyle Oliver and Sandy Milien, explore living a life committed to living the way of God’s unconditional, unselfish, sacrificial and redemptive love.Each week in Season 1, Bishop Curry introduces one of the seven Way of Love, Practices for a Jesus-Centered Life: Turn, Learn, Pray, Worship, Bless, Go, and Rest. Listeners are invited into deeper engagement with each practice as Kyle and Sandy share their insights and offer questions for reflection or small group discussion.New episodes air Tuesdays through July 30.The Way of Love: with Bishop Michael Curry, is available on all podcast apps and atepiscopalchurch.org. Visit the Way of Love podcast webpage to subscribe to the podcast through Apple iTunes, Google Play or Spotify and to sign up for notifications of new seasons as well as additional featured content. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Back to Press Releases Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

Tips for a Healthy, Safer Summer Picnic

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom TAGSFlorida Hospital – ApopkaHealthy Picnic Previous articleOn This Day: The Battle of Britain beginsNext articleMissing Dogs Update Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply  Summer’s here, so dust off the picnic basket! But before hitting the beach or your favorite park, here are tips from Sherri Flynt, registered/licensed dietitian, Florida Hospital Center for Nutritional Excellence, for packing a healthier picnic basket and ensuring that the only “bugs” joining you are ants.Tap into summer’s bounty. Take plenty of chopped veggies as a crunchy alternative to chips. Try broccoli slaw, tossed with a low-fat poppy seed dressing, instead of traditional slaw. Pack berries, watermelon slices and frozen grapes for a tasty treat on a hot day.Salad alternatives. Rethink mayonnaise-based salads. They’re higher in fat and calories and loved by foodborne illness-causing bacteria. Oil and vinegar dressings (less oil, more vinegar) not only cut back on fat, but the acid keeps food safer. Try out this light and refreshing English cucumber salad.Healthier indulgences for your sweet tooth. If fresh fruit doesn’t satisfy your picnic sweet tooth, bring bite-sized desserts. Angel food cake topped with fresh berries and a bit of light whipped cream, keep it onice, is also a healthier option.Grill safely. Grilling is a picnic favorite. And grilling healthfully is important. To minimizeproductionof compounds that pose a cancer risk, marinate before grilling using thyme, sage, garlic, or rosemary. Because heat and fat are the real culprits, trim all visible fat, flip your meat, poultry, or fish often, and grill at a lower temperature (below 325º F). But don’t undercook. And, be sure to wash your hands! Handling raw meat is a sure fire way to spread bacteria to other foods you may touch.Keep all food safe. According to the Food and Drug Administration, summer months see an increase in foodborne illnesses. To keep those “bugs” from joining your picnic, keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Cold foods should be kept in a cooler and on ice throughout the picnic. Hot foods (like chicken or hot dogs) should be covered in foil to retain the heat. And don’t let any food sit out for very long.Stay well hydrated. While enjoying the outdoors, it’s easy to get dehydrated, especially children as they don’t want to stop their fun to grab a drink. Have plenty of cool water on hand and encourage everyone to drink liberally.Also, have a plan for being active. Whether it’s canoeing, playing a game of Frisbee football, or kicking a soccer ball, picnics are a great time for families to move together. Please enter your name here Picnic Advice From Florida Hospital  Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more