History of Raymoghey and Manorcunningham to be examined on field trip

first_img Pinterest Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Twitter Harps come back to win in Waterford Twitter WhatsApp Homepage BannerNews Heritage Week is coming to an end, with a number of events in Donegal over the weekend.One of them involves an exploration of the fact that before Raphoe became the diocesan centre for the church in Donegal, the see was based at Raymoghey near Manorcunningham, which was founded by St Patrick.Amateur historian Leonard Roarty believes the move to Raphoe followed Viking raids up the Swilly.On Sunday, Mr Roarty will lead a field trip around Raymoghey and the surrounding area, meeting at Manorcunningham Resource Centre at 2pm.He says while the area was important during the plantation, it’s been inhabitedAudio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/leonard.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.for thousands of years………….. Google+center_img By News Highland – August 25, 2017 Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR History of Raymoghey and Manorcunningham to be examined on field trip Previous articleStormont says agencies are monitoring risk of further localised floodingNext articleMore rain on the way today, but weekend will be drier – Met Eireann News Highland Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

The freshwater system west of the Antarctic Peninsula: spatial and temporal changes

first_imgClimate change west of the Antarctic Peninsula is the most rapid of anywhere in the Southern Hemisphere, with associated changes in the rates and distributions of freshwater inputs to the ocean. Here, results from the first comprehensive survey of oxygen isotopes in seawater in this region are used to quantify spatial patterns of meteoric water (glacial discharge and precipitation) separately from sea ice melt. High levels of meteoric water are found close to the coast, due to orographic effects on precipitation and strong glacial discharge. Concentrations decrease offshore, driving significant southward geostrophic flows (up to ~30 cm s−1). These produce high meteoric water concentrations at the southern end of the sampling grid, where collapse of the Wilkins Ice Shelf may also have contributed. Sea ice melt concentrations are lower than meteoric water and patchier because of the mobile nature of the sea ice itself. Nonetheless, net sea ice production in the northern part of the sampling grid is inferred; combined with net sea ice melt in the south, this indicates an overall southward ice motion. The survey is contextualized temporally using a decade-long series of isotope data from a coastal Antarctic Peninsula site. This shows a temporal decline in meteoric water in the upper ocean, contrary to expectations based on increasing precipitation and accelerating deglaciation. This is driven by the increasing occurrence of deeper winter mixed layers and has potential implications for concentrations of trace metals supplied to the euphotic zone by glacial discharge. As the regional freshwater system evolves, the continuing isotope monitoring described here will elucidate the ongoing impacts on climate and the ecosystem.last_img read more

With Bailouts Under Federal Scrutiny, Ohio Utilities ‘Look to Legislature’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Ohio utilities are likely to urge an end to the state’s current competitive market for generation and take other actions in the wake of federal regulators’ decision this week to halt wholesale electric deals for affiliates’ less competitive plants.On Wednesday, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission announced it would require commission scrutiny before American Electric Power and FirstEnergy could enter into deals with their generation affiliates to buy all the power from certain power plants that have been less competitive in the markets.“[T]his Commission has an independent role to ensure that wholesale sales of electric energy and capacity are just and reasonable and to protect against affiliate abuse,” FERC said in its orders.On Thursday, AEP spokesperson Melissa McHenry indicated that the company would now be undertaking a “strategic review” of the plants.The comments track remarks made earlier in the morning by AEP CEO Nick Akins.FirstEnergy CEO Chuck Jones has previously said he would end deregulation of Ohio’s competitive electricity market “in a heartbeat.”Industry competitors, consumer protection organizations and environmental groups have called the proposed deals “bailouts,” because they would require all ratepayers to guarantee sales and a profit for certain power plants, regardless of whom customers choose as their electricity supplier.With ‘bailouts’ under federal scrutiny, Ohio utilities look to legislature With Bailouts Under Federal Scrutiny, Ohio Utilities ‘Look to Legislature’last_img read more

Extreme Miniaturization to Navigate without GPS

first_img Unavailability of GPS would be inconvenient for drivers on the road, but could be disastrous for military missions. DARPA is working to protect against such a scenario, and an emerging solution is much smaller than the navigation instruments in today’s defense systems. The U.S. Military relies on the space-based Global Positioning System (GPS) to aid air, land and sea navigation. Like the GPS units in many automobiles today, a simple receiver and some processing power is all that is needed for accurate navigation. But, what if the GPS satellites suddenly became unavailable due to malfunction, enemy action or simple interference, such as driving into a tunnel? “Both the structural layer of the sensors and the integrated package are made of silica,” said Andrei Shkel, DARPA program manager. “The hardness and the high-performance material properties of silica make it the material of choice for integrating all of these devices into a miniature package. The resulting TIMU is small enough and should be robust enough for applications (when GPS is unavailable or limited for a short period of time) such as personnel tracking, handheld navigation, small diameter munitions and small airborne platforms.” By Dialogo May 03, 2013 Three pieces of information are needed to navigate between known points ‘A’ and ‘B’ with precision: orientation, acceleration and time. This new chip integrates state-of-the-art devices that can measure all three simultaneously. This elegant design is accomplished through new fabrication processes in high-quality materials for multi-layered, packaged inertial sensors and a timing unit, all in a tiny 10 cubic millimeter package. Each of the six micro fabricated layers of the TIMU is only 50 microns thick, approximately the thickness of a human hair. Each layer has a different function, akin to floors in a building. DARPA researchers at the University of Michigan have made significant progress with a timing & inertial measurement unit (TIMU) that contains everything needed to aid navigation when GPS is temporarily unavailable. The single chip TIMU prototype contains a six axis IMU (three gyroscopes and three accelerometers) and integrates a highly-accurate master clock into a single miniature system, smaller than the size of a penny. This chip integrates breakthrough devices (clocks, gyroscopes and accelerometers), materials and designs from DARPA’s Micro-Technology for Positioning, Navigation and Timing (Micro-PNT) program. The goal of the Micro-Technology for Positioning, Navigation and Timing (Micro-PNT) program is to develop technology for self-contained, chip-scale inertial navigation and precision guidance. Other recent breakthroughs from Micro-PNT include new micro fabrication methods and materials for inertial sensors.last_img read more

A new CEO, a new vision for a New York credit union

first_imgWhen Visions Federal Credit Union($4.2B, Endwell, NY) initially invited Ty Muse to interview for the cooperative’s CEO position, Muse, who was satisfied with his role as CFO at a nearby credit union, declined.“I was a finance guy,” Muse says. “I was living near where I grew up and was making a difference in my community.”But after thinking it over, he saw the role for what it was: an opportunity.“How many large, strong credit unions only a few hours from my hometown was I going to come across that wanted to talk to me about becoming the CEO?” he says.Muse decided he wanted the job, and he took the helm on May 1, 2013. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

Alison Saar on Transforming Outrage Into Art

first_img– Advertisement – Yemoja crops up in my work a lot. I first discovered her when I was living in New York in the 1990s, trying to grapple with being a young mother and having a career — it felt like a real balancing act. I did a piece then called “Cool Maman,” who is balancing actual pots and pans on her head, all white enamelware. I see Yemoja as not only helping me in terms of patience and balance and child rearing but also as a watery, life-giving spirit who nourishes my creative process.For your “Topsy Turvy” show in 2018 at L.A. Louver, you turned Topsy, the enslaved character from “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” into these fierce warrior girls. You even did a mixtape for the show, “Angry Songs for Angry Times.” How would you describe the source of your anger, and was it tricky for you to channel or unleash it?- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Conking is a type of hair processing where a lot of really toxic ingredients strip the hair of what makes it curl. Early on one of the ingredients was lye. By straightening her hair, this woman was eating the “lye” or “lie,” trying to separate herself from her African-American body, and that’s why I show her head separated from her body. I did a lot of severed heads at one point — I guess I’ve had anger in my work for a while.Do you think it’s fair to say that a survey of your work is also a survey of things Black women do to their hair?Yes [laughs]. I’m a little obsessed with hair. I think part of it is being biracial and very fair-skinned, to the point of being perceived as white; my hair is the one thing that feels like a real connection to my African-American ancestry. And much of my young life was spent going with my mother to salons and going through these hilarious, hair-straightening rituals with my cousins in the kitchen. These figures are defiant but tender; they are beautiful warriors. Do you think about that contradiction? – Advertisement – I think it’s always about a balance, and that comes back to the Yemoja character, balancing so much on her head. A lot of my life has been a balancing act between anger and a kind of serenity, and that’s also reflected in my process. I start by thinking about things, dreaming about things, but the actual work involves chain saws and hammers and knives and blades and a lot of bandages — I get cut a lot. The physical grappling with materials is very aggressive.You have a history of using scavenged materials, whether painting on seed sacks or sculpting with ceiling tin. When did you discover ceiling tin as a material, and what does it give you that you couldn’t get from more traditional mediums like stone or wood?When I moved to New York from Los Angeles in the ’80s, I had a job at the Studio Museum of Harlem, working as a sort of registrar before I became an artist in residence there. Walking to the museum, I saw all of this amazing ceiling tin out on the curb from people renovating townhouses. I would drag it into my studio. On the one hand, it covered up imperfections in the wood sculpture underneath — I was using wood from the dumpster that had holes and cracks. But it also created a kind of skin or armor. I loved the pattern because it reminded me of African scarification, which in some ways is an external biographer, telling us who you are married to or what group you belong to. Your new sculpture for Pomona shows Yemoja, the Yoruba goddess associated with childbirth and rivers, carrying a stack of heavy pails on her head. What does Yemoja represent to you?center_img You come from a family of artists. Your mother is Betye Saar. Your father, Richard Saar, was a conservator and ceramist. Your sister Lezley Saar is an artist. Did you ever consider doing anything else for a living?I really wanted after high school to get out from under the shadow of my mother’s reputation. So when I was studying at Scripps, I worked with Dr. Samella Lewis and was looking to be an art historian specializing in the African diaspora and non-Western culture. I did a dual major: fine arts and art history. I just think, at the end of it, I felt I was better suited to making art than writing about it. It was more gratifying. It was something I had been trained to do all my life. Alison Saar likes to make sculptures of strong Black women standing their ground: broad shoulders, wide stance, unmovable in their convictions. She made a bronze monument of Harriet Tubman that presides over a traffic island at 122nd Street in Harlem. She created a small army of enslaved girls turned warriors, inspired by Harriet Beecher Stowe’s character Topsy for a major gallery show in Los Angeles. And now Ms. Saar, 64, has a new public sculpture on the Pomona College campus, commissioned by the Benton Museum of Art there: “Imbue,” a 12-foot-tall bronze evoking the Yoruba goddess Yemoja.“Imbue” accompanies her biggest museum survey yet, “Of Aether and Earthe,” which will be held in two venues: the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena, which plans to open its section in January; and the Benton, in Claremont, Calif., where her show is installed and ready to open when the state’s coronavirus guidelines allow. Below are edited excerpts from a conversation with the artist about her new show and ongoing obsessions. You recently made a benefit print honoring Black Lives Matter, titled “Rise,” which shows a woman making a power fist. Was there a particular source for your image?I looked at a lot of images of women from the Black Panther movement with their Afros and fists raised and then contemporized the hairstyle to say we’re still fighting the same battle. I didn’t want it to be one woman. I love Angela Davis, but there are a lot of other women that don’t get recognized, and I’m paying tribute to them all. Some people see the Black Panthers as militant and frightening. To me, the women were very much involved in education, free food, taking care of the elderly, these incredible community practices that are always being erased by the image of the guy holding the rifles. I’ve always wanted my work not to just be angry but point toward some resolution or express some optimism. But it’s been harder and harder to come up with something positive. After Obama was elected, we started seeing these horrible things bubbling up on social media — about growing watermelons at the White House or casting him and Michelle as monkeys.Since then, with Trump and the white supremacists, things have been getting even darker and more frightening. In “Topsy Turvy,” the last piece was “Jubilee,” a figure cutting her hair off and dancing, removing the social shackles and all the pain we are carrying around. But it’s still a painful piece in my eyes. I basically stopped worrying about putting out a positive message anymore; I felt that it was OK to express being furious. Printmaking is one of the most populist art forms, connected historically to ideas of accessibility and, at times, democracy. Do you see printmaking as a political tool?I’ve never really thought of my printmaking as political but very much about it being populist, accessible and affordable. I love the history of broadsides where people would print out a poem and plaster the city with them, and I’ve done a couple with poets. Your Benton show includes a disturbing sculpture, “Conked,” where a woman swallows her own long hair, made of wire. I take it the title refers to the old-school hair straightening process?last_img read more

Mexican Drug Lord El Chapo Sentenced to Life in Prison +30 Years

first_imgWednesday, a federal judge sentenced Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman to life in prison plus 30 years.The Court also ordered “El Chapo” to pay $12.6 Billion in forfeiture.The 62-year-old Guzman was sentenced moments ago after being found guilty earlier this year of trafficking hundreds of tons of cocaine, heroin, methamphetamines, and marijuana to the U.S.Restitution will be determined later.Guzman told the Brooklyn judge Wednesday morning that his life behind bars has been miserable.Guzman said Wednesday that he’s been forced to drink unsanitary water, denied access to fresh air and sunlight.He has escaped twice from maximum-security prisons in Mexico, once by digging a mile-long tunnel from his cell.U.S. officials say “that won’t happen again.”It remains unclear where El Chapo will serve his life sentence, but reports indicate he will likely reside at the U.S. Penitentiary, Administrative Maximum Facility (ADX) in Florence, Colorado.The ADX Florence facility is reportedly the most secure “Supermax” prison in the nation.Attorney Mariel Colon, who has visited Guzman regularly in prison before, during, and after his trial, says she is optimistic about his chances on appeal.last_img read more