Chumba, Kiplagat eye Chicago Marathon repeats

first_imgAnother intriguing challenger is Kenyan Stephen Sambu, making his marathon debut.Sambu, who has been outstanding in shorter distance road races since graduating from the University of Arizona in 2012, warmed up for the event with a victory in the seven-mile Falmouth Road Race in August.In the women’s race, Kiplagat will try to become the first woman to win back-to-back titles since Berhane Adere of Ethiopia in 2006 and 2007.Kiplagat made her decisive surge in the 25th mile last year to pull away from Ethiopians Yebrqual Melese and Birhane Dibaba.Fellow Kenyan Edna Kiplagat, who is the only other woman in the field to have run faster than 2:20, will make be running in Chicago for the first time, as will Ethiopian Gulume Chala.The other former champion in the field is Atsede Baysa, who won in Chicago in 2010 and 2012, while Melese returns vying to improve on her runner-up finish of last year.Paris Marathon winner Visiline Jepkesho, who represented Kenya at the Rio Olympics, is also in the field. Chicago, United States | AFP | Kenyans Dickson Chumba and Florence Kiplagat aim to defend their titles at the Chicago Marathon on Sunday, with 2012 winner Tsegaye Kebede out to spoil Chumba’s repeat bid in the Windy City.Chumba pulled away in the final three miles to lead a Kenyan sweep of the podium last year in 2hr 09min 25sec, with Sammy Kitwara second and Sammy Ndungu third.It was the slowest time in Chicago since 2007 after organizers opted not to use pace-setters.The 29-year-old Chumba, who finished third in Tokyo in 2:07:34 in his only prior marathon this year, is expected to face a strong challenge from Ethiopia’s Kebede, whose 2012 time of 2:04:38 was a personal best and then-course record.Kebede is also remembered for a thrilling 2010 duel in Chicago with Sammy Wanjiru, who emerged with the victory.World record-holder Dennis Kimetto was initially scheduled to race but was forced to withdraw due to a leg injury.Three other men in the field have run 2:07 or better, including Ethiopian Abayney Ayele — who clocked 2:06:45 in Dubai this year — and Chumba’s fellow Kenyans Abel Kirui and Micah Kogo.Kogo is still seeking a first marathon victory. He set his personal best of 2:06:56 in finishing fourth in Chicago in 2013. Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

WDFW Approves ‘Bonus’ Razor Clam Dig Starting May 18 at Mocrocks

first_imgFacebook56Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Washington Department of Fish and WildlifeState shellfish managers have approved a “bonus” razor clam dig on ocean beaches for three days, May 18-20.State shellfish managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) approved the dig on morning low tides after marine toxin tests showed the clams are safe to eat. No digging will be allowed on any beach after noon.The upcoming dig is approved on the following beaches, dates, and morning low tides:May 18, Saturday, 6:58 a.m.; -1.4 feet; MocrocksMay 19, Sunday, 7:41 a.m.; -1.6 feet; MocrocksMay 20, Monday, 8:23 a.m.; -1.6 feet; Mocrocks“We are happy to announce that healthy clam populations on Mocrocks beach support another dig,” said Ayres.The southern border of Mocrocks Beach is the Copalis River and the northern border of Mocrocks is the southern end of Quinault Indian Reservation, just south of the Moclips River. Mocrocks includes the following popular areas: Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips Beach.Copalis Beach, just south of Mocrocks, will not be open.All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2019-20 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach; 2018-19 licenses are no longer valid for this dig. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license (starting at $9.70) to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW’s website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container.WDFW is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting and other outdoor recreation opportunities. WDFW razor clam digs support outdoor lifestyles and coastal economies.Persons with disabilities who need to receive this information in an alternative format or who need reasonable accommodations to participate in WDFW-sponsored public meetings or other activities may contact Dolores Noyes by phone (360-902-2349), TTY (360-902-2207), or email ([email protected]). For more information, see https://wdfw.wa.gov/accessibility/reasonable_request.html.last_img read more