Hurst, Dolan head to state championships

first_imgExperience will be key for both Katie Hurst and Lizzie Dolan this weekend, as they bid to close out the track and field season on a high.The two Humboldt-Del Norte League standouts will make the trip to Clovis for the CIF State Track and Field Championships, one of the most prestigious prep meets in the nation.Each, however, has been there before, and that experience could mean something when the competition gets under way today.Hurst, in fact, is making her third trip to the meet, having …last_img read more

Cousins’ game-changing phone call? Warriors GM Myers thought it was a spoof

first_imgMost of the important decisions of the offseason had … Even now, nearly three months since the phone rang in the office of Warriors general manager Bob Myers, it’s difficult to wrap your head around.DeMarcus Cousins, a Warrior.Even less likely than the concept was the process.“When it was clear I couldn’t stay in New Orleans,” Cousins wrote in The Players Tribune this week, “I went out and created what would end up being the best opportunity for myself. I called Bob Myers up.”last_img read more

Early Large Spiral Galaxy Resembles Milky Way

first_imgAstronomers using adaptive optics at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Paranal, Chile took spectra of a galaxy at red-shift 2.38 described as an “early young galaxy” that must have, according to current theory, formed very rapidly, because it looks like the Milky Way.  The observations by Genzel et al., published in Nature,1 were described by Robert C. Kennicutt (editor of Astrophysical Journal) in the same issue of Nature2 this way:On page 786 of this issue1, Genzel et al. present remarkable observations of what appears to be a newly formed spiral galaxy, observed when the Universe was just a fifth of its current age.  The result is doubly significant: first, it provides the most detailed glimpse so far of the formation of a galaxy similar to our own Milky Way; second, it demonstrates the power of a new generation of high-resolution instruments that use adaptive optics to study the information and evolution of far-off galaxies.Though Kennicutt claims that our growing catalog of deep-space observations have given rise to “a self-consistent picture of the evolution of galaxies,” he did find it remarkable that such a distant galaxy would look so familiar:The authors’ observations of BzK-15504 reveal it to be a giant spiral galaxy, with a size and mass similar to that of the Milky Way, but observed just 3 billion years after the Big Bang.  It shows many similarities to present-day spiral galaxies, with rotational properties that, again, are nearly identical to those of the Milky Way.  These similarities are notable because they imply that at least some large disk galaxies were broadly in place even at these early cosmic epochs.He says that the spectra imply a rapid burst of star formation in this galaxy 50 times greater than that assumed in our own.  The authors of the paper, after stating the “framework” of galaxy evolution, admitted to some anomalies in the picture:It remains unclear, however, over what timescales galaxies were assembled and when and how bulges and disks—the primary components of present-day galaxies—were formed.  It is also puzzling that the most massive galaxies were more abundant and were forming stars more rapidly at early epochs than expected from models.Everyone thought large spiral galaxies formed late in the evolution of the cosmos.  Kennicut said, “large spiral galaxies with well-developed disks similar to the Milky Way are conspicuously absent in both observations and models of the early Universe.  These large spirals are expected to form rather late, so one would not expect to find many of them at early times,” he added.  But why there are any galaxies this large and mature at such an early age?  “Both these and other results from the same programme are challenging theorists to account for the existence of such massive and well-formed galaxies at such early cosmic epochs, he added, changing the subject to the promise of adaptive optics to answer that question.1Genzel et al., “The rapid formation of a large rotating disk galaxy three billion years after the Big Bang,” Nature 442, 786-789(17 August 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature05052; Received 25 April 2006; Accepted 6 July 2006.2Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., “Astronomy: Young spirals get older,” Nature 442, 753-754(17 August 2006) | doi:10.1038/442753a; Published online 16 August 2006.The juxtaposition of cockiness about their models and head-scratching about the particulars is what is puzzling.  To keep the model together, they have to have this galaxy, which is surely representative of billions more, forming stars and evolving so rapidly that it looks mature at one-fifth the assumed age of the universe.  This pattern of early maturity is the Cambrian Explosion of cosmology, also known as the Lumpiness Problem.  The early universe shows much more structure (lumpiness) than expected from a nearly homogeneous expansion of an initially uniform particle soup (uniform, that is, to within one part in a hundred thousandth of a degree temperature of the cosmic background radiation).  Astronomers seem to take their lumps in stride.  Sometimes, however, discretion is the better part of valor.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Cancer.vive riders bring awareness, hope

first_imgThe provinces of Gauteng, North West, Limpopo and Mpumalanga will be covered on the 1 995km journey undertaken by the riders. (Image: Cancer.vive)What better way to get first-hand experience of beating cancer than from a cancer survivor? The fifth annual Cancer.vive Awareness Ride brings you this experience.Over 65 cancer survivors aim to get people in the provinces of Gauteng, North West, Limpopo and Mpumalanga talking about cancer as they embark on a 1 995km ride, stopping in towns along the route to educate residents about how to detect cancer at an early stage, and how to get appropriate treatment.The journey undertaken will proceed as pictured.(Image: Cancer.vive)The Cancer.vive Awareness Ride is a project of People Living with Cancer. The latter was established in 2002 by Carl Liebenberg and Linda Greeff, both of whom are cancer survivors, to provide a national support structure for people living with cancer, cancer survivors and their families.Janie du Plessis, chief executive of People Living with Cancer, explained the thinking behind the organisation, saying to SA Goodnews: “Being diagnosed with cancer has an enormous impact on your life. We aim to make people diagnosed feel that they are not alone, and let them know that many cancers have a very high survival rate if caught early enough.“We also don’t leave them without support, but connect them to Cancer Buddies, a project that assists patients and their families through diagnosis and treatment.”Spar and Revlon are the main sponsors of the ride, with Triumph, Caltex, Imperial Ford and Mazda, Meadow Feeds and Netcare 911 also contributing to the cause.“Spar is proud to once again be involved as sponsors of this vital cause,” said Helen Barrett, Spar group advertising and promotions manager. “We feel it is of critical importance that more people are made aware of cancer and how to detect the early warning signs.”Adele du Plessis, Revlon communications manager, said the cosmetics company was honoured to be involved in raising awareness around this cause and the ways and means of beating it. “The sincere dedication of the Cancer.vive team perfectly reflects the core principles of our company,” said Du Plessis.SURVIVOR DRIVEN PROJECTThe Cancer.vive Awareness Ride is a survivor-driven project that uses performing arts, music, poetry, dance and storytelling to celebrate victory over the disease.According to the organisation’s website, statistics show more people die of cancer than of Aids-related illness, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and therefore the focus of the rally is to care, support and create awareness.The ride aims to leave the communities the group has visited with a better understanding of the various “shy” cancers, as they are known, such as breast, prostate, testicle, cervix, ovary, rectal and colon, as well as to establish support structures. After the Cancer.Vive visit, people will be better informed about how to identify the cancer warning signs and care for cancer patients in their midst.Over the past four years, the rally has entertained, engaged and educated more than 180 000 people through travels over a distance of 10 000km. It has visited eight provinces and shared the message in seven languages.last_img read more