Goodbye crabs! Latest Zoopla TV campaign to break on Boxing Day

first_imgHome » News » Marketing » Goodbye crabs! Latest Zoopla TV campaign to break on Boxing Day previous nextMarketingGoodbye crabs! Latest Zoopla TV campaign to break on Boxing DayThe campaign is to feature two different 30-second TV adverts targeting first time buyers with voice-overs by actress and stand-up comedian Diane Morgan.Nigel Lewis23rd December 20191 Comment3,240 Views Zoopla is to launch its latest advertising campaign on Boxing Day, the portal’s first to be created by new advertising agency Lucky Generals after it decided to increase its marketing spend by 25%, and the first new creative since its ‘crabs’ adverts.It will kick-off an eight week blitz both on TV and online and include two 30-second adverts aimed at first time buyers, one of the key growth sectors in the property market today.The campaign is designed to take advantage of the post-Christmas home hunting rush, which is expected to be particularly intense after the New Year now that the Brexit log-jam at least feels unblocked following the General Election.Zoopla says applicant leads will increase by 85% and valuation leads by 80% across the festive period and that an additional 16 million visits will be made to its siteVoiced by comedy actress Diane Morgan (left), the adverts explore why first time buyers purchase their homes including to stop living with their parents and to do up a property to their own tastes, all designed to plug the new Zoopla tagline: ‘We know what a home is really worth’.Agents can expect to see the ads across Channel 4, Sky and ITV2 during several high-profile programmes including Love Island, Gogglebox and Premier League matches.“Our new campaign brings to life Zoopla’s understanding of both the emotional and rational value of moving home,” says marketing chief Gary Bramall.“Last year, we saw an upsurge of 15 million web sessions from Christmas into early January. That figure is expected to grow by more than a million this year and presents an unrivalled opportunity for us to drive value and specifically valuation leads, and deliver tangible return on investment, for agents.”Watch the ad  December 23, 2019Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 23rd December 2019 at 12:16 pmDiane Morgan is great and her usual actor personae strikes a deep chord of recognition with audiences, she is typically ironic, tragic and upbeat all in the same sentence, so as a figurehead for part of the Lucky Generals Zoopla campaign she is spot on.Though with the trembling wall and moving picture, Zoopla may have overlooked, in this nod to bedroom farce, the fact that in reality 70% of first time buyers are in fact in rented accommodation before they buy, rather than living at home with the ‘tyranny’ of ‘parents.’Overall though, this advert will get the Zoopla brand out there, with its imaginative content, and Zoopla at least will start the 2020’s pushing the boundaries, and not a crab in sight.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Alison Saar on Transforming Outrage Into Art

first_img– Advertisement – Yemoja crops up in my work a lot. I first discovered her when I was living in New York in the 1990s, trying to grapple with being a young mother and having a career — it felt like a real balancing act. I did a piece then called “Cool Maman,” who is balancing actual pots and pans on her head, all white enamelware. I see Yemoja as not only helping me in terms of patience and balance and child rearing but also as a watery, life-giving spirit who nourishes my creative process.For your “Topsy Turvy” show in 2018 at L.A. Louver, you turned Topsy, the enslaved character from “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” into these fierce warrior girls. You even did a mixtape for the show, “Angry Songs for Angry Times.” How would you describe the source of your anger, and was it tricky for you to channel or unleash it?- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Conking is a type of hair processing where a lot of really toxic ingredients strip the hair of what makes it curl. Early on one of the ingredients was lye. By straightening her hair, this woman was eating the “lye” or “lie,” trying to separate herself from her African-American body, and that’s why I show her head separated from her body. I did a lot of severed heads at one point — I guess I’ve had anger in my work for a while.Do you think it’s fair to say that a survey of your work is also a survey of things Black women do to their hair?Yes [laughs]. I’m a little obsessed with hair. I think part of it is being biracial and very fair-skinned, to the point of being perceived as white; my hair is the one thing that feels like a real connection to my African-American ancestry. And much of my young life was spent going with my mother to salons and going through these hilarious, hair-straightening rituals with my cousins in the kitchen. These figures are defiant but tender; they are beautiful warriors. Do you think about that contradiction? – Advertisement – I think it’s always about a balance, and that comes back to the Yemoja character, balancing so much on her head. A lot of my life has been a balancing act between anger and a kind of serenity, and that’s also reflected in my process. I start by thinking about things, dreaming about things, but the actual work involves chain saws and hammers and knives and blades and a lot of bandages — I get cut a lot. The physical grappling with materials is very aggressive.You have a history of using scavenged materials, whether painting on seed sacks or sculpting with ceiling tin. When did you discover ceiling tin as a material, and what does it give you that you couldn’t get from more traditional mediums like stone or wood?When I moved to New York from Los Angeles in the ’80s, I had a job at the Studio Museum of Harlem, working as a sort of registrar before I became an artist in residence there. Walking to the museum, I saw all of this amazing ceiling tin out on the curb from people renovating townhouses. I would drag it into my studio. On the one hand, it covered up imperfections in the wood sculpture underneath — I was using wood from the dumpster that had holes and cracks. But it also created a kind of skin or armor. I loved the pattern because it reminded me of African scarification, which in some ways is an external biographer, telling us who you are married to or what group you belong to. Your new sculpture for Pomona shows Yemoja, the Yoruba goddess associated with childbirth and rivers, carrying a stack of heavy pails on her head. What does Yemoja represent to you?center_img You come from a family of artists. Your mother is Betye Saar. Your father, Richard Saar, was a conservator and ceramist. Your sister Lezley Saar is an artist. Did you ever consider doing anything else for a living?I really wanted after high school to get out from under the shadow of my mother’s reputation. So when I was studying at Scripps, I worked with Dr. Samella Lewis and was looking to be an art historian specializing in the African diaspora and non-Western culture. I did a dual major: fine arts and art history. I just think, at the end of it, I felt I was better suited to making art than writing about it. It was more gratifying. It was something I had been trained to do all my life. Alison Saar likes to make sculptures of strong Black women standing their ground: broad shoulders, wide stance, unmovable in their convictions. She made a bronze monument of Harriet Tubman that presides over a traffic island at 122nd Street in Harlem. She created a small army of enslaved girls turned warriors, inspired by Harriet Beecher Stowe’s character Topsy for a major gallery show in Los Angeles. And now Ms. Saar, 64, has a new public sculpture on the Pomona College campus, commissioned by the Benton Museum of Art there: “Imbue,” a 12-foot-tall bronze evoking the Yoruba goddess Yemoja.“Imbue” accompanies her biggest museum survey yet, “Of Aether and Earthe,” which will be held in two venues: the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena, which plans to open its section in January; and the Benton, in Claremont, Calif., where her show is installed and ready to open when the state’s coronavirus guidelines allow. Below are edited excerpts from a conversation with the artist about her new show and ongoing obsessions. You recently made a benefit print honoring Black Lives Matter, titled “Rise,” which shows a woman making a power fist. Was there a particular source for your image?I looked at a lot of images of women from the Black Panther movement with their Afros and fists raised and then contemporized the hairstyle to say we’re still fighting the same battle. I didn’t want it to be one woman. I love Angela Davis, but there are a lot of other women that don’t get recognized, and I’m paying tribute to them all. Some people see the Black Panthers as militant and frightening. To me, the women were very much involved in education, free food, taking care of the elderly, these incredible community practices that are always being erased by the image of the guy holding the rifles. I’ve always wanted my work not to just be angry but point toward some resolution or express some optimism. But it’s been harder and harder to come up with something positive. After Obama was elected, we started seeing these horrible things bubbling up on social media — about growing watermelons at the White House or casting him and Michelle as monkeys.Since then, with Trump and the white supremacists, things have been getting even darker and more frightening. In “Topsy Turvy,” the last piece was “Jubilee,” a figure cutting her hair off and dancing, removing the social shackles and all the pain we are carrying around. But it’s still a painful piece in my eyes. I basically stopped worrying about putting out a positive message anymore; I felt that it was OK to express being furious. Printmaking is one of the most populist art forms, connected historically to ideas of accessibility and, at times, democracy. Do you see printmaking as a political tool?I’ve never really thought of my printmaking as political but very much about it being populist, accessible and affordable. I love the history of broadsides where people would print out a poem and plaster the city with them, and I’ve done a couple with poets. Your Benton show includes a disturbing sculpture, “Conked,” where a woman swallows her own long hair, made of wire. I take it the title refers to the old-school hair straightening process?last_img read more

Dzeko makes case for Wembley place

first_img He added: “With his goal we are in the Champions League and probably in second position.” Dzeko’s future has been the subject of speculation and Mancini feels the 27-year-old, who has now scored 14 times this season, can improve. He said: “In the end he has scored important goals this season. I think he can do better. For me he is a top striker but he could score more goals. “It is clear he didn’t play all the games. I think he is one of the best in Europe for me but he can do better than this year.” Yaya Toure, Vincent Kompany, Pablo Zabaleta, Sergio Aguero and David Silva were among those players rested by Mancini. Toure had been a fitness doubt after being withdrawn at half-time at Swansea last Saturday through fatigue but Mancini expects him to be fit for Wembley. He said: “Yaya was at home to sleep. He had a problem, he was tired. Against Swansea he had a problem and we prefer he had a rest. We have four days and I need to see the players the next couple of days. I will take the last decision on Saturday. “I thought this was a difficult game because we changed a lot of players. We needed fresh players for this game and in the end it is important that we won.” Press Association Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini felt Edin Dzeko had given him an FA Cup final selection nudge by scoring his side’s winner against West Brom.center_img The Bosnian struck against the Baggies for the third time this season to hand a much-changed City a 1-0 win from a surprisingly open Barclays Premier League contest at the Etihad Stadium. The victory strengthened City’s grip on second place in the table and also made mathematically certain of Champions League football next season. Mancini had made eight changes with Saturday’s Wembley date with Wigan in mind but Dzeko could have played himself into contention, and the Italian said: “Yes, could be. I am happy because he scored an important goal. We have four days to recover from this game, so could be.” last_img read more