Lambert hails Villa’s hunger after big-spending QPR fall short

first_imgAston Villa boss Paul Lambert suggested that his team’s battling draw at QPR said much about the respective clubs’ transfer policies.Lambert has looked to nurture young talent at Villa, while Rangers are bottom of the table and without a league win this season despite their big spending.“Money doesn’t guarantee success,” said Lambert.“If you can build team spirit and have lads with hunger and enthusiasm it’s great to work with. You’ve always got to have that hunger.”More reaction to follow later.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Food and culture celebrated in District Six cookbook

first_imgDistrict Six Huis Kombuis Food and Memory is a cookbook that combines peoples’ stories with food, a binding force in the community. The District Six Huis Kombuis Food and Memory cookbook combines stories and food from District Six. (Image: Quivertree Publications)Compiled by Priya PitamberDistrict Six Huis Kombuis Food and Memory , a cookbook that’s come from District Six in Cape Town weaves together recipes from the past and a deep sense of culture with fond memories from the people who made and ate the dishes.The Afrikaans part of the title, huis kombuis means “house kitchen”, and the creations contained in the book come from people who lived in District Six, recipes that have been in families for many a generation.“[The title] was inspired by descriptions of kitchens in participants’ homes as being the heart of the home, its central social space,” said Tina Smith, curator of the District Six Museum and lead author of the book.District Six Huis Kombuis: Food and Memory Cookbook pic.twitter.com/NOpmPBJKl3— MountainViewHermanus (@MVHermanus) November 25, 2016Importance of District SixAt the launch of the cookbook in November 2017, Smith described food as a connecting factor, as well as a gateway to District Six.“We are not just presenting a book, it’s our culture. Everything in this cookbook is part of our past. This is not gourmet cuisine, it’s afval [offal], it’s what people had to make from what they had and it became a celebration,” she told news website IOL.“We are celebrating our past, and this book reminds us of our past.”People of all races and religions lived together in District Six, on the doorstep of Cape Town’s city bowl. From the 1800s, it became home to freed slaves, merchants, artisans, labourers and immigrants. But with the advent of the Group Areas Act in 1966, it was declared a whites-only area. Residents were removed and relocated, their houses razed and the vibrant culture of the area destroyed.The launch of the cookbook marked the 50th anniversary of the declaration.Food: at the heart the narrativeThe book is not only filled with recipes, but stories from contributors, former residents of District Six. Many recall cooking simple meals on old stoves, using wood, paraffin or coal for heat.Victoreen Gilbert, who now lives in Newlands, said many households cooked similar meals, and some of the favourite dishes were soup, crayfish curry, bredies [stews] and skaapkop [sheep’s head].“When we were invited to eat at a neighbour’s house, we all would be nodding because the chances were that our mothers made the same food,” Gilbert said.Sylvia Gangert recalled a sweet dish that was popular in District Six, after the fruit truck made its round.“They used to give us the bruised fruits and our moms would stew them and serve it with custard,” Gangert told IOL.“And we had no fridges for jelly. We had to buy blocks of ice and the young men would carry them up the stairs at Bloemhof Flats. Or we used a kitchen cupboard with the mesh door — a spens [pantry] is what they called it.”Mogammat Benjamin fondly remembered how food was often communal. “We also used to share. We ate from everyone — Christian or Muslim. The Christians used to respect the Muslims enough to cook food out of pots and pans which were not tainted.” Muslims do not eat pork nor drink alcohol.The foodRecipes in the book include a variety of meals, from bredies, to koeksisters, and samosas.“Here traditional recipes were brought to life in the rituals of cooking, eating and the sensory exchange at the kitchen table,” said Smith.“Culinary rituals and home craft practices maintained and reinforced deep significances and connections with District Six as a place of home, family and community.”Source: IOLWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Told to quit, Benedicto finishes race despite adversities

first_imgNBA: Shaq blames ‘the man upstairs’ for his poor free throw shooting Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant It wasn’t the result the multi-time winner had in mind, but it’s a performance he can live with.“I can say that I’m still successful. I’m proud of myself that I was able to finish the race,” he said.Another source of Benedicto’s pride are his fellow competitors like winner Banjo Norte, who are showing that there are more Filipino triathletes capable of competing with the world’s best.“I’m glad that they’re there and are all targeting me. I’m proud that they get a chance to win. I’m happy that they want to beat me and that inspires the younger crop of triathletes who also wants to beat them. We all get stronger and who knows, we’ll be able to compete among the elites in the future,” he said.But Benedicto made it clear that he has a lot of gas left in his tank, and his failure in the Cebu tilt just motivates him to strive harder in the next races.ADVERTISEMENT National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress NGCP on security risk: Chinese just technical advisers View comments LATEST STORIES Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Gamescenter_img MOST READ “People are telling me to no longer finish the race, to give up. But in my mind, I’m number one in the Asian elite so the pressure is different. All I wanted was to finish the race,” he said in Filipino.The 33-year-old Benedicto felt a slight pain, which was later ruled as spasms, midway through the bike course when he almost hit a competitor who suddenly changed his path.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“That was when I felt the fatigue,” he shared. “Later on, I felt that my ribs were hurting. I was struggling to breathe. I put ice on my chest but people are telling me to no longer finish this.”August Benedicto. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netDespite the chest pains, Benedicto willed on and ended up eighth in his category, joyously crossing the finish line before falling to the arms of Sunrise Events founder Wilfred Steven Uytengsu. FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo August Benedicto. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netLAPU-LAPU CITY — Though August Benedicto failed to make it to the podium in the Asian elite category of the 2017 Cobra Energy Drink Ironman 70.3 Philippines on Sunday, the four-time winner still considers his run as a success.After all, Benedicto had to fight through chest pains midway through the swim-bike-run course just to finish the race.ADVERTISEMENT “They also become my motivation because I want to get back at them next time. It drives me harder. It makes me double or triple my effort to beat them the next time out,” he said.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’last_img read more

Sakkari Upsets Venus Williams to Reach Silicon Valley Semis

first_imgSAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Maria Sakkari of Greece upset third-seeded Venus Williams 6-4, 7-6 (2) on Friday night in the quarterfinals of the Mubadala Silicon Valley Classic.Sakkari came back from 0-3 in the first set and 3-5 in the second set. She advanced to face American Danielle Collins — with the winner reaching her first WTA final.Collins, a two-time NCAA champion for Virginia, advanced after former world No. 1 Victoria Azarenka of Belarus retired midway through the second set due to injury.Azarenka led 4-2 in the first set before needing a tiebreaker to win the 72-minutes set 7-6 (4). She grabbed her right leg in the opening game of the second set, lost the first three games and was evaluated by a trainer and doctor before retiring prior to the fourth game.Fifth-seeded Mihaela Buzarnescu of Romania secured the first semifinal spot by beating Australia’s Ajla Tomljanovic 6-1, 7-5. The Romanian will face No. 4 seed Elise Mertens.Mertens, a Belgian, saved two set points in the first set, forced a tiebreak and won four straight games in the second set for a 7-6 (4), 6-3 victory over Johanna Konta. It’s Mertens’ fifth WTA semifinal of the year.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more