Chicago and Los Angeles Could Get Google Fiber And Thats a Very

first_imgDecember 9, 2015 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Enroll Now for Freecenter_img The second and third largest cities in the U.S. have the potential to score some serious startup swag: Google has just announced that it is considering bringing its ultra-fast Google Fiber Internet service to Los Angeles and Chicago.The deals are far from complete, and if approved, will take years to be up and running, but the wheels are in motion. Faster Internet would mean more opportunity for entrepreneurs and startups in both cities.“In Chicago, fiber Internet will help bolster a fast-growing startup scene by fueling incubators like 1871, venture capital funds like Chicago Ventures and hundreds of small businesses,” says Jill Szuchmacher, the director of Google Fiber Expansion, in a blog post announcing the news. “In L.A., faster Internet may mean that indie musicians and YouTube stars can spend less time worrying about bandwidth, and more time creating their next project.”  Related: Chicago: The New B2B BoomtownLos Angeles and Chicago are the biggest cities Google Fiber has considered so far. The first step in the process of determining feasibility for Google is to do a detailed analysis of the city’s existing infrastructure and land structure.Right now, only three cities have the Google Fiber Network: Provo, Utah; Kansas City, Mo.; and Austin, Texas. Another half dozen cities are in various process of installation, including Salt Lake City, Nashville and Atlanta.Google Fiber delivers Internet at 1,000 megabits per second, or 1 gigabit per second. That’s many multiples faster than the Internet in most U.S. cities, though not all. The city of Chattanooga, Tenn., is a — potentially surprising — leader in Internet connectivity speed in the U.S. The Southern city’s economy got a boost when the metro-area installed 1 gigabit Internet service, which it claimed that was 200 times faster than the national average. In October, Chattanooga upgraded the Internet broadband again and now it has service as fast as 10 gigabits per second available. The service has proven transformative for the once dilapidated, rundown and polluted city.Related: 3 Sizzling Stats to Consider About Silicon Beach 2 min readlast_img read more

March 22 2017ANDREAS KAPSALIS returns to Arcosant

first_imgMarch 22, 2017ANDREAS KAPSALIS returns to Arcosanti for a Solo Guitar Performance in the Arcosanti cafe on Sunday afternoon, March 26, 2017 at 1:30 pm. “I am very impressed that Andreas could cover on guitar what I had written for piano. It is quite amazing to hear my own music performed by great instrumentalists.” – Dave Brubeck, American jazz pianist and composer“Andreas is reinventing the art of guitar playing. He is the next level.” – Jim Tulio, Grammy Award winning producerConcert Ticket: $20 ($10 for students)
Buffet Lunch available at Cafe: $10For ticket purchase, please call 928.632.6217Andreas Kapsalis is a Greek American guitarist and composer born in the suburbs of Chicago. His first exposure to music was through his mother, Frances, a student of opera, and his father Peter, a violinist. Andreas began teaching himself guitar at the age of 11, reading and writing music as well as music theory. At the age of 18 he suffered a hand injury; during his recovery period, he began developing his 10 finger tapping techniques. Under the tutelage of composer and producer Jim Tullio, a student of Aaron Copland, he refined his compositional approach on the guitar using these techniques. Tullio produced Andreas’ first EP with Andreas’ arrangement of Dave Brubeck’s composition Blue Rondo a la Turk, which garnered attention from the composer himself, who said “I am very impressed that Andreas could cover on guitar what I had written for piano. It is quite amazing to hear my own music performed by great instrumentalists.”Andreas began performing nationally with the Andreas Kapsalis Trio and recorded two discs featuring his compositions. While performing in LA, he was invited to apply for the Sundance Composers Labs. He was awarded the fellowship, an honor awarded to only six composers a year. This was his initiation into film composing. At the end of the Sundance Composers Lab, Andreas was invited by the directors to complete a score for their documentary film “Black Gold” among the documentaries selected for the January premier at the Sundance Film Festival. Founder of the Sundance Institute and Festival, Robert Redford, noted this was the first time in Sundance Institute history that documentary fellows and a composer fellow had an “official selection” at the Sundance Film Festival. Subsequently, he composed scores for several documentary and feature films such as “Pig Business” and “Mulberry Street” to name a few. He also has been commissioned by Northwestern University and Notre Dame to compose music for their silent film festivals as well. Following this, Andreas performed and recorded several discs with Polish singer/contra bassist Megitza and the AKGI duo. He has been performing internationally, solo and in various ensembles for festivals and concert series in North America, Europe and Asia, such as Montreaux Jazz Festival in Switzerland, the Calcutta Guitar Festival in India, the Canadian Guitar Festival and the Guitar Festival in the Phillipines.In addition, concerts have taken place in Germany, Austria, Poland and Slovakia. 
Most recently Andreas was invited to Armenia to participate in “Sounds of Peace” a musical exchange featuring 60 artists from 10 different countries. Throughout his career he has also enjoyed teaching guitar for many years, first at the Kapsalis Music Shoppe, Elgin Community College, and Northwestern University Mini Courses. Being very much a self taught musician with a relatively unique playing technique and musical perspective, together with the variety of cultural experiences in the world of music, and as a traveler, Andreas continues to be inspired and eager to share the beauty of music and how it can enrich one’s life. Among his many projects, Andreas is composing and arranging pieces for a solo album.last_img read more

Sensor stickers transform the human body into a multitouch surface

Sensors now make it possible to capture touches on the body very precisely, even from multiple fingers. Researchers have successfully tested a new prototype sensor in four different applications. Provided by Saarland University “The human body offers a large surface that is easy to access, even without eye contact,” said Jürgen Steimle, a professor of computer science at Saarland University, explaining the researchers’ interest in this literal human-computer interface. The development was challenging because the such sensors could not measure touches precisely enough, nor could they capture them from multiple fingertips simultaneously. The prototype sensor, named Multi-Touch Skin, looks similar in structure to the touch displays that are well known from smartphones. Two stacked electrode layers, each arrayed in rows and columns, form a kind of coordinate system, at whose intersections electrical capacitance is constantly measured. Capacitance is reduced at the point where fingers touch the sensor, because the fingers conduct electricity and therefore allow the charge to drain away. These changes are captured at each point, and thus touches from multiple fingers can be detected. In order to find the optimal balance between conductivity, mechanical robustness and flexibility, the researchers evaluated different materials. Silver was chosen as the conductor, PVC plastic for the insulating material between the electrodes, and PET plastic for the substrate; the sensor could be printed using a household inkjet printer in less than a minute.”So that we could really use the sensors on all parts of the body, we had to free them from their rectangular shape. That was an important aspect,” explains Aditya Shekhar Nittala, who is doing his doctoral research in Jürgen Steimle’s group. The scientists therefore developed software for designers to create their own desired sensor shapes. In the program, the designer first draws the outer shape of the sensor, then outlines the area within this outer shape that is to be touch-sensitive. A special algorithm then calculates the layout that will optimally cover this defined area with touch-sensitive electrodes. Finally, the sensor is printed.The usefulness of this new freedom of form is demonstrated in one of the four test prototypes, each of which the scientists produced with their novel fabrication method. It was designed to fit a test participant’s right ear. The subject could swipe upward or downward in order to use it as a volume control. Swiping right or left changes the song being played, while touching with a flat finger stops the song.For the Saarbrücken scientists, Multi-Touch Skin is further proof that research into on-skin interfaces is worthwhile. In the future, they want to focus on providing even more advanced sensor design programs, and to develop sensors that capture multiple sensory modalities. Citation: Sensor stickers transform the human body into a multi-touch surface (2018, May 7) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-sensor-stickers-human-body-multi-touch.html Mobile on-body devices can be precisely and discreetly controlled using a tiny sensor This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Saarbruecken computer scientists have developed novel skin sensors that allow mobile devices to be controlled from any point on the body. Credit: Saarland University Explore further read more