Scientists go rogue vs. Trump’s gag order

first_imgPresident Donald Trump inflamed another section of the population by signing a gag order on government scientists and specific agencies after being in office less than one week. The Environmental Protection Agency; the U.S. Department of Agriculture; the Department of the Interior, including the National Park Service; the Department of Health and Human Services, which includes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and the National Institutes of Health were all named.Trump ordered removal of all fact-based studies, press releases, social media and blogs related to EPA research that show evidence of carbon emissions intensifying global warming.  Everything must now be first reviewed by the Trump administration.Plans are underway to cut the EPA’s budget by $I billion and cut thousands of staff members. (Daily News, Jan. 26) Trump ordered the EPA to freeze all grants and contracts, which will impact programs that improve air quality, protect drinking water and dispose of hazardous waste and toxins from old industrial sites.The Agricultural Research Service of the USDA provides scientific solutions to instruct farmers on how to best increase food crops and livestock. Their research, funded by the federal government from public taxes, must now go through Trump. His appointee for secretary of agriculture, Sonny Perdue, has used huge federal subsidies to help fertilizer and chemical companies and large agricultural conglomerates that destroy the environment in their quest for profits.Mobilizing for ‘March for Science’A storm of resistance to Trump’s gag order on science has prompted a number of independent calls for a national March for Science in Washington. The first website calling for the march collected over 60,000 members overnight. March details are evolving. Twitter sites are growing as plans develop; see #StandUp4Science and #ScienceMarch.The Union of Concerned Scientists website features an appeal: “Resist this: The Trump Administration’s Control+Alt+Delete Strategy on Climate Change.” The article by senior analyst Erika Spanger-Siegfried, posted Jan. 26, explains that the White House is trying to “control scientists working in federal agencies, alter science-based policies and delete scientific information.”The UCS says that “scientists, universities, nonprofits” and individuals “have teamed up to download and safeguard federal resources — data, reports, tools, etc.”  The organization promotes the March for Science, which “gained hundreds of thousands of followers” within hours of being announced.  Also, “federal employees, now restricted on Twitter, have secured ‘rogue’ Twitter handles” and are communicating “with the public, to greater followings than ever.” (tinyurl.com/zzbswyb)By silencing agency scientists, Trump has unleashed over 80 rogue twitter accounts by anonymous federal employees, such as #ungaggedEPA, #StuffEPAWouldSay and #NotAltWorld.A posting on #NoAltWorld reads, “Can’t wait for President Trump to call us fake news” and “You can take our official twitter, but you’ll never take our free time!”  (Jan. 24)#RogueNASA stands for “science and climate news and facts. Real news, real facts.” Trump’s tweet posted there read: “As your president, I have no higher duty than to protect the lives of the American people.” In response someone posted, “And you can start by protecting and preserving the planet we call home.” (Jan. 26)Trump favors business interests over protecting the environment. He wrongly blames China for creating the concept of global warming “to make U.S. manufacturing noncompetitive.” (Nov. 6, 2012, tweet, reposted at #NotAltWorld, Jan. 26) He also tweeted, “Any and all weather events are used by the global warming hoaxsters to justify higher taxes to save our planet! They don’t believe it.” (Jan. 26, 2014)However, Trump’s ridiculous claims are refuted worldwide. There is a consensus among 97 percent of climate-change scientists that global-warming trends from the last 100 years are caused by humans. In January, data from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration showed that 2016 was the hottest year in recorded history.While the White House debunks climate-change science, Cuba is planning to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels by building 59 new solar parks. The goal is to increase renewable energy so it produces 24 percent of the country’s electricity by 2030. This is despite the nearly 60-year U.S. blockade of the socialist island.A cornerstone of scientific inquiry is communication and collaboration, which has been increasing with globalization. Sharing research data fosters ideas, creativity and facts the world relies on. Censorship and the promotion of policies based on maximizing capitalist profits, while ignoring environmental devastation, lead to fake science. That does a disservice to the world’s peoples and is damaging to the planet itself.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

BBC journalist dies from injuries in Mogadishu shooting

first_imgNews March 2, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders voiced its deep regret today at the death of BBC reporter Kate Peyton, who was fatally injured in a drive-by shooting yesterday as she was entering a hotel in Mogadishu. “We are shocked and saddened by her death, and our thoughts go out to her family and friends,” the press freedom organization said. News SomaliaAfrica Reporters Without Borders voiced its deep regret today at the death of BBC reporter Kate Peyton, who was fatally injured in a drive-by shooting yesterday as she was entering a hotel in Mogadishu to meet the speaker of Somalia’s transitional parliament, Sharif Hassan Sheikh Aden. “We are shocked and saddened by her death, and our thoughts go out to her family and friends,” the press freedom organization said.”If there were any need, this cowardly attack on a journalist shows that it is imperative that a democratic state, guaranteeing the freedom and safety of its citizens, be rebuilt as soon as possible in Somalia,” Reporters Without Borders said.”We have long been condemning the arbitrary violence reigning in the streets of Mogadishu,” the organization pointed out. “As most of the clan chiefs have declared their allegiance to the new government, we call on the last diehards to not spoil this chance for peace being offered Somalia today. This is the essential condition for preventing a repetition of this kind of attack and catching its perpetrators.”Usually based in Johannesburg, Peyton, 39, was hit in the back by a pistol shot fired by masked men in a white Toyota Corolla taxi shortly after 3 p.m. as she was outside the Hotel Sahafi International in southern Mogadishu with several bodyguards around her. Peter Greste, another BBC journalist who was beside her, was not hit.Peyton was rushed to the Medina Hospital, several kilometres away, where a doctor operated on her injury, according to the Somali Journalist Network (SOJON), a local press freedom group. The doctor said he had to remove her spleen, and that her liver was also slightly injured. She died from her injuries a few hours later before she could be evacuated to Nairobi.Peyton’s bodyguards had given chase to the gunmen who had fired at her. Their car was found crashed, with a pistol inside, in Barmuda, a district in the centre Mogadishu. The gunmen had fled on foot. In the absence of any central authority, the neighbourhood where the shooting occurred is normally under the control of hotel security guards. Most foreigners visiting Mogadishu hire bodyguards.Peyton was part of a group of foreign reporters accompanying a delegation of Somali parliamentarians who are supposed to pave the way for the transitional government’s arrival in Somalia on 21 February. Since his installation on 29 August 2004, the parliamentary speaker has been chairing sessions in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi because Somalia is so dangerous. February 24, 2021 Find out more RSF requests urgent adoption of moratorium on arrests of journalists Radio reporter gunned on city street in central Somalia RSF and NUSOJ call for release of a journalist held in Somalia’s Puntland region News to go further RSF_en SomaliaAfrica Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Somalia Organisation February 10, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 BBC journalist dies from injuries in Mogadishu shooting Receive email alerts January 8, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Indonesia has more bird flu deaths; Azerbaijan probes possible cluster

first_imgMar 10, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The human toll of H5N1 avian influenza mounted again today with reports of the deaths of two young Indonesian patients, while authorities in Azerbaijan were investigating a cluster of 10 suspected human cases in one village.The World Health Organization (WHO) listed one of the Indonesian victims as a 4-year-old boy from Semarang in central Java who fell ill on Feb 10 and died Feb 28.The other victim was a 12-year-old girl who died Mar 1 in Solo, also in central Java, according to an Associated Press (AP) report citing Health Minister Siti Fadilah Supari as the source. The report said the WHO reference laboratory in Hong Kong had confirmed the case.The AP also reported on the boy from Semarang but described him as a 3-year-old. Indonesian Health Ministry official Hariadi Wibisono said his case was confirmed by a local lab and later by a lab in Atlanta, according to the story.The WHO said an investigation showed that the boy lived in a neighborhood where chickens had died shortly before he became ill. The AP report said both patients “appeared to have come into contact with infected birds.”The two cases apparently raise Indonesia’s count of human cases to 29 with 22 deaths and the global tally to 177 cases with 98 deaths, though the WHO has not yet noted the 12-year-old girl’s case at this writing.Agricultural authorities have reported a recent increase in poultry deaths in central and eastern Java, the WHO said, adding, “These reports have led to a heightened awareness of the risk of human cases and a higher level of clinical suspicion when patients present with respiratory symptoms.”Many Indonesian patients initially suspected of having avian flu have been cleared by lab tests, the WHO added.In Azerbaijan, authorities are investigating suspicious illnesses in 10 people, all from the same town, of whom three have died, the WHO reported in a separate statement today. Azerbaijan, a former Soviet republic on the west side of the Caspian Sea, reported its first H5N1 outbreak in wild birds on Feb 9 and found an outbreak in poultry 2 weeks ago.The patients in the cluster are all from the settlement of Daikyand in the Salyan area in southeastern Azerbaijan, the WHO said. Their homes are near wetlands used by migratory birds, and poultry deaths have been reported in their town, but the cause was not yet known.The surviving patients include a 16-year-old boy who is hospitalized in critical condition and six people who were hospitalized with mild symptoms but have recovered and been discharged, the WHO said.Among the three patients who died was a 17-year-old girl who succumbed on Feb 23 after suffering for more than a year from respiratory symptoms associated with a “neoplastic condition” (tumor), the agency said. The preexisting illness is now believed to have caused her death, but samples from her will be tested in England.The second victim was a 20-year-old woman and a neighbor of the first victim. She had rapidly progressive acute pneumonia—typical of H5N1 cases—and died Mar 3, the WHO said. The third victim, a 17-year-old girl, died Mar 8; officials gave no details on her illness.The agency did not say whether any of the patients or victims are related. But an Agence France-Presse report published yesterday quoted WHO spokeswoman Maria Cheng as saying the cluster includes eight members of one family.If any of the cases are determined to be H5N1, Azerbaijan will be the eighth country to face human cases. The list now includes Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, China, Turkey, and Iraq.The WHO said the Azerbaijani health authorities have responded well to the situation but have been hampered by a lack of some essential equipment and inadequate diagnostic capacity. A WHO team is in the country to assess needs and provide technical support, and more personnel and supplies are due to arrive Mar 13, the agency said.The patients in the cluster have been treated with oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a limited supply of which is available in the country, the WHO said.See also:WHO statement on case of 4-year-old boy in Indonesiahttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_03_10/en/index.htmlWHO statement on situation in Azerbaijanhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_03_10a/en/index.htmllast_img read more

Whicker: Dodgers have overcome an 0-2 World Series deficit before, in more turbulent times

first_img Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire PreviousLos Angeles Dodgers Vice President Al Campanis, left, Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, Dodgers President Peter OMalley and Manager Tommy Lasorda, right, pose with the World Series Championship trophy, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1981, New York. (AP photo)Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela is interviewed by Manager Tommy Lasorda before a game against the Chicago Cubs on June 7, 1981 at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Months later, Valenzuela was the winning pitcher in Game 3 of the World Series, beginning the Dodgers’ rally from an 0-2 series deficit against the Yankees. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)From left, Dodgers outfielder Pedro Guerrero, catcher Steve Yeager and third baseman Ron Cey shared World Series MVP honors after the team defeated the Yankees in six games in the 1981 World Series. (AP Photo) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Dodgers batter Ron Cey, wearing a new helmet with an ear flap, watches his single go out in the first inning off New York Yankees pitcher Tommy John in the World Series, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1981, New York. Cey got the single on the first pitch to him since being beamed Sunday in Los Angeles. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela blows bubbles as he passes the time in the dugout during the rain delay before the NL playoff game with the Expos, Oct. 18, 1981, Montreal, Canada. Valenzuela is scheduled to be the game’s starting pitcher for the Dodgers. (AP Photo/Rusty Kennedy)New York Yankee batter Reggie Jackson, center, flips over to get away from a high inside pitch from Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Burt Hooton in the first inning of the World Series, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1981, New York. Dodger catcher Steve Yeager returns the pitch to Hooton. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers batter Pedro Guerrero follows through after connecting on a New York Yankees pitch in a World Series game, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1981, New York. Guerrero came up with several key hits in the game. The catcher is unidentified. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda, right, congratulates Dodgers runner Derrel Thomas, center, after Thomas scored in the sixth inning of the World Series, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1981, New York. Davey Lopes (15) of the Dodgers moves to offer his congratulations. (AP Photo)Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela is doused with champagne by teammate Tom Niedenfuer after the Dodgers won the 1981 National League title over the Expos on Oct. 20, 1981, in Montreal. The following week, Valenzuela earned the win in Game 3 of the World Series, beginning the Dodgers’ rally from an 0-2 series deficit. (AP Photo/MacAlpine)Tommy Lasorda, center, and unidentified Dodgers celebrate after they won the sixth game of the World Series after losing the first two to the Yankees, Oct., 1981, New York. (AP Photo)** FILE ** Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Steve Howe, center, is embraced by teammates after the Dodgers beat the New York Yankees to win the World Series in this Oct. 29, 1981 photo at New York’s Yankee Stadium. Howe, the relief pitcher whose promising career was derailed by drug and alcohol abuse, died Friday, April 287, 2006, when his pickup truck rolled over in Coachella, Calif. He was 48. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Steve Howe, right, first baseman Steve Garvey, left, and catcher Steve Yeager jump for joy after the Dodgers defeated the New York Yankees to win the World Series at Yankee Stadium, Wednesday, Oct. 29, 1981, New York. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Steve Howe, first baseman Steve Garvey and catcher Steve Yeager celebrate after the Dodgers overwhelmed the New York Yankees to win the World Series in Yankee Stadium in New York Wednesday night, October 28, 1981. (AP Photo)From left, Dodgers third baseman Derrel Thomas, pitcher Steve Howe, catcher Steve Yeager and first baseman Steve Garvey embrace after they defeated the Yankees 9-2 in Game 6 of the 1981 World Series to win the title at Yankee Stadium in New York. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda races to join the celebration after the Dodgers beat the New York Yankees to win the World Series in New York Wednesday night, October 28, 1981. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda is covered with shaving cream and soaked with champagne after the team’s victory party in the clubhouse after winning the World Series in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 29, 1981. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Jerry Reuss, right, celebrates with Dodger manager Tommy Lasorda after the Dodgers won the sixth game of the World Series, winning the series and defeating the Yankees in four straight games, Wednesday, Oct. 29, 1981, New York. The two are covered with shaving cream during the traditional locker room celebration. (AP Photo)Los Angeles Dodgers Vice President Al Campanis, left, Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, Dodgers President Peter OMalley and Manager Tommy Lasorda, right, pose with the World Series Championship trophy, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1981, New York. (AP photo)Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela is interviewed by Manager Tommy Lasorda before a game against the Chicago Cubs on June 7, 1981 at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Months later, Valenzuela was the winning pitcher in Game 3 of the World Series, beginning the Dodgers’ rally from an 0-2 series deficit against the Yankees. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 18Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela is interviewed by Manager Tommy Lasorda before a game against the Chicago Cubs on June 7, 1981 at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Months later, Valenzuela was the winning pitcher in Game 3 of the World Series, beginning the Dodgers’ rally from an 0-2 series deficit against the Yankees. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)ExpandThis is not a lame attempt to implant hope.It is just a reminder that the ’95 Braves, the ’86 Red Sox and the ’85 Cardinals did not win the World Series after they led 2-0, and the ’18 Dodgers have not yet lost this one.In 1981 the Dodgers lost Games 1-2 at Yankee Stadium. They were dealing with a 16-year championship drought which threatened to haunt Steve Garvey, Ron Cey, Davey Lopes and Bill Russell into retirement.In Game 3 the Dodgers started Fernando Valenzuela, a rookie pitcher.center_img “Are you going to take that choking team back to those animal fans?” one asked, according to The Boss. Steinbrenner decked both guys but also broke his left hand.This happened two weeks after Yankee teammates Reggie Jackson and Graig Nettles brawled at an Oakland restaurant.“Where were you when I needed you?” Steinbrenner asked Nettles, and Jackson delightedly re-created the fight in Howard Cosell’s accent.Dodgers fans were also delighted, as Pedro Guerrero drove in five runs in the 9-2 Game 6 win, and Tommy John was livid that Lemon removed him after four innings.Everyone else just needed a nap.The 1981 season severely damaged baseball. The players went on strike from June 12 until Aug. 9. The owners had already stockpiled strike insurance. They demanded the players accept a strict form of player compensation for free-agent signings. The players’ only options were surrender or walk.On the final game before the strike, Pete Rose got his 3,630th hit, tying Stan Musial’s National League record, and did so against Nolan Ryan. No one knew when he’d get 3,631.There was a Hall of Fame ceremony, with Bob Gibson inducted, but no big-league teams played the Hall of Fame Game. Referring to union leader Marvin Miller, the mayor of Cooperstown told the crowd, “The last time that happened, the little man with the mustache lived in Berlin.”Eventually the owners agreed to expand the compensation pool to all teams, not just the one that lost a player, and the players agreed to a six-year wait before free agency.The players were also savaged for their immense greed. Winfield was the highest-paid player in 1981. He made $1.4 million.Then came the real furor. Teams played unequal schedules, from 102 to 110 games. Baseball decided to reward the “first-half” winners with a playoff spot. The “second-half” winners also qualified, to create an extra playoff layer. That is why Game 6 happened on Oct. 28, and now early-winter baseball is commonplace.St. Louis and Cincinnati had the top full-season records in the NL East and West. They missed the playoffs because they didn’t win either “half.” Kansas City got into the AL playoffs with a 50-53 record.The Dodgers won the “first half” by a half-game over the Reds because they played one more game, and then coasted.They won a best-of-5 series over Houston after they trailed 2-0. They won another best-of-5 over Montreal when down 2-1, as Rick Monday homered off Steve Rogers, a starter trying to relieve.Valenzuela bobbed and weaved his way through Game 3 of the World Series. He gave up nine hits and walked seven. He also pitched nine innings and won 5-4.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error They did not lose again.On Friday these Dodgers start Walker Buehler, another rookie. Although Buehlermania has not sprouted yet, he should be fine.The ’81 Yankees were not on the level of the ’18 Red Sox: Too old in spots, too young in others, and submerged in the usual Madness of King George.Owner George Steinbrenner second-guessed Manager Bob Lemon for over-using Ron Guidry and was thought to have ordered the benching of reliable center fielder Jerry Mumphrey. When it was over, he needled Dave Winfield, an eventual Hall of Famer, by calling him “1 for 22” and “Mr. May.”The Yankees fell behind the Dodgers 3-2 on a Sunday, and Steinbrenner unhappily boarded an elevator at the Wilshire Hyatt. Two Dodgers fans joined him. Lasorda went to the mound and, in Spanish, said, “If you don’t give up another run we’re going to win this game.”Valenzuela, in English, replied, “Are you sure?”In Game 5 Goose Gossage beaned Ron Cey so frightfully that Cey’s wife Fran later told him, “I thought you were dead.” Cey played in Game 6 and shared Series MVP honors with Guerrero and Steve Yeager.And a Baseball Writers’ Association charter flew to L.A. after Game 2, ran into its own headwinds, had to stop to refuel in Omaha, and landed just in time for a classic L.A. rush hour.The bedraggled passengers got to the Biltmore Hotel and, within the hour, were rocked by two earthquakes.Sometimes the good old days are just old.last_img read more