Colombian Drinking Games

first_imgI’ve spent the past week in Colombia, mostly road biking and backpacking in the country’s national parks testing gear (look for full reviews next week), but I’ve also had some opportunities to explore Colombia’s beer culture. The craft beer scene is in its infancy down here, and doesn’t have the depth of craft beer in the U.S. Few countries do. The only craft beer option I could find was from the Bogota Beer Company, which has a number of brewpubs all over the Colombia. If you’re ever down here, seek out their Roja, a balanced amber.But even if you never set foot in Colombia, there’s plenty we can learn from our South American friends. First of all, why the hell don’t we have these personal tap systems in bars in the U.S.?Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 12.06.04 PMIt’s called a “giraffe,” and it holds something like three liters of beer. The waitress puts it right there on your table. It’s like your own personal tap. And it’s beautiful. You finish a pint, you just pour yourself another one. You don’t have to get up. You don’t have to raise your hand and try to catch the waitress’ attention…you are the master of your own destiny.The second thing I’d like to import from Colombia is the drinking game, Rana. It’s like cornhole, but so much better.Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 12.07.29 PMSo, there’s a box with holes in it and three frogs. You get some metal discs, stand about 12 feet away from the box, and try to throw those discs into the holes and frogs mouth. Get a disc into the mouth of a frog, and it’s 100 points. Hit one of the holes on the side, and it’s 15 points, or 40 points, or more or less, depending on the hole. It’s a simple game, but it’s addictive as hell. I think the trick is in the wrist, kind of like with horseshoes. Also, the more you drink, the better you get. Like horseshoes.I’m an amateur at it now, but I’d like to think that with the right amount of training, I could really up my game. And that’s what traveling is all about—absorbing tiny pieces of foreign culture to become a more well-rounded individual.last_img read more

Chainsaws and the Chattooga

first_imgSteven Foy knows well the magical feeling of paddling down the legendary Chattooga River. A Texas transplant and veteran river guide, Foy returns to the river’s roaring rapids each year. The river’s channels–and all their twists, turns and dips–call to him as they do for so many other whitewater fans, who recognize the Chattooga as one of the best whitewater experiences in the United States.“It has … a special place in the heart of most Southeastern whitewater enthusiasts,” says Foy, who manages river operations for the Nantahala Outdoor Center.It’s no wonder the river garners such affection among whitewater aficionados. Though it starts as little more than a trickle in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, it builds into the Southeast’s premier whitewater experience, delivering breathtaking views and adrenaline-rushing rapids in an unparalleled natural setting. Perhaps most famous as the backdrop for the movie Deliverance, its rock-strewn whitewater offers Class II-IV rapids as the river winds its way through the gorge, culminating with the renowned Five Falls, where five Class IV rapids follow in quick succession.Protected in 1974 under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, the Chattooga stretches for 57 miles before joining with the Tallulah River in Lake Tugalo, forming the boundary between Georgia and South Carolina along the way. The U.S. Forest Service manages about 70 percent of the river’s 180,000-acre watershed in the southern Appalachian Mountains, which includes portions of northeastern Georgia, western North Carolina and upstate South Carolina.“Because of that wild and scenic designation and because of the large Forest Service ownership, it has really good water quality and a really intact ecosystem,” said Kevin Colburn of American Whitewater, a non-profit advocacy group based in Cullowhee, N.C. “It just really retains a lot of interesting character.”Logging projects raise concerns about water qualityBut maintaining that character isn’t an easy task. On national forest land, the Forest Service must attempt to balance the needs and desires of competing users, including environmentalists, whitewater rafters, timber companies and anglers. And on private land, the challenges are even greater–with conflicts among different user groups, private landowners, and local and state officials.Another issue: because the Chattooga is fed by many tributaries and small streams, those who want to protect the river have to worry not just about what’s happening in the river itself and nearby land, but also what’s going on upstream.Case in point: Stekoa Creek, one of the Chattooga’s largest tributaries, has been a major source of water pollution in the river for more than 40 years, and things haven’t gotten any better with the river’s wild and scenic status. The Chattooga Conservancy calls Stekoa Creek the single greatest threat to the river’s water quality, noting that the Forest Service has at times warned river users that contact with water below its confluence with the Chattooga River could put them at risk for bacterial skin infections.Local environmental groups are also worried that a large-scale logging and forest management project in Georgia’s Chattahoochee National Forest would hamper water quality in another tributary, Warwoman Creek. After 10 years of planning, the Forest Service recently released a final project design that incorporated many elements environmentalists had been fighting for, including a one-third reduction in commercial logging, added protections for old-growth forests, the abandonment of a plan to build a mile of new road on steep slopes, plans to reduce erosion on 11 miles of existing roads, and the closure of some existing roads that have been a long-term source of sediment pollution. The final decision–announced last Halloween–is expected to reduce impacts on a rugged and remote area known as Windy Gap as well as significantly improve water quality in the Warwoman watershed.“The Forest Service did a good job of listening to the concerns of the public and responding in a way that leads to a net benefit for water quality in this area, but still allows the Forest Service to do the work they want to do,” said Patrick Hunter, a staff attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center in Asheville, N.C., who represented the environmental groups.Despite this hard-fought victory for local environmentalists, they still remain concerned about timber harvesting and water quality. Only about one-quarter of the Chattooga watershed is protected from logging, including designated roadless areas, the Ellicott Wilderness Area and its “wilderness extension” study areas, and a quarter-mile buffer on either side of the river in the 15,432-acre Chattooga Wild and Scenic River Corridor.Hunter noted that many people do not realize the amount of logging and road-building that takes place on national forest lands, thinking they are protected as public lands in the same way that national parks are. But the Forest Service has a very different mandate than the National Park Service, and that includes not just protecting forest lands but also allowing–and in many cases encouraging–timber production on them as well.Gifford Pinchot, the first chief of the Forest Service, said the agency’s mission was “to provide the greatest amount of good for the greatest amount of people in the long run.”That has proved to be a difficult–and often controversial–calling.For their part, environmental groups are concerned about the effects of timber harvesting on the Chattooga, particularly from sediment entering the river from roads built to access timber harvesting areas and the accompanying traffic along those roads, including 18-wheel logging trucks and other big machinery. Too much sedimentation can coat river and creek bottoms, impairing insect growth and reproduction. That means not just cloudy water instead of the crystal clear river that epitomizes the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but also less food for fish and the animals (and humans) that rely on them.In the worst case, a logging project can take away not just the trees that are cut down, but also destroy the very essence of a natural area. “For a hiker, where you were once walking through a forest that hasn’t been disturbed, after a lot of these trees have been removed, it’s a much different experience,” Hunter said. “You can feel the impact of man much more up close after these sorts of events.”One way environmental groups and other interested parties can influence timber management near the Chattooga River is by participating in the forest plan revision process. These forest management plans, typically updated every 10-15 years, guide all aspects of the way these public lands are managed, including recreation and timber harvesting.The land and resource management plans for the Sumter and Chattahoochee-Oconee national forests were finalized in 2004 and are not yet up for revision again, but the Nantahala and Pisgah national forests are currently in the process of revising their plan, with a draft environmental impact statement expected to be released by this spring.Nicole Hayler, executive director of the nonprofit Chattooga Conservancy, said her group is hoping to see continued protections for the Ellicott Wilderness extension areas and heightened protections for Terrapin Mountain, which includes the Chattooga’s headwaters. “There’s all these incredible lichens and mosses [up there] to the point where you’re almost afraid to step on anything,” said Hayler, explaining the importance of limiting human foot traffic on Terrapin Mountain.While environmental groups have expressed concerns about timber harvesting in the Chattooga watershed, Forest Service officials emphasized that only a very small fraction of the forest is cut in any given year. In the 530,000-acre Nantahala National Forest, for example, that amounts to about 900-1,000 acres annually–or about 0.002 percent.Mike Wilkins, a district ranger with the Nantahala National Forest, said the agency generally avoids clearcutting, except in cases where large swaths of trees have been negatively impacted by storm events, and that only about half of the Nantahala and Pisgah national forests are currently open to some form of timber management. And he emphasized that all timber sales go through a lengthy, multi-year process that includes input from Forest Service experts–including botanists, archaeologists, foresters and biologists–as well as the general public.“It’s not like we just go out anywhere and start cutting timber,” Wilkins said. “We take an interdisciplinary approach to the land, and we’re letting the public know what we’re thinking about doing from the very beginning.”Forest Service officials also argue that some timber management is necessary to restore the forest to a more natural state, since past policies of fire suppression have created dense stands of white pines with little to no young oak trees or grassy openings. For example, in the Upper Warwoman project area, yellow pine-oak communities are less than half their historic range and just 1 percent of the 12,500-acre project area has young grass and tree habitat essential for deer, wild turkey and ruffled grouse. The Forest Service says five of the seven ecosystems in the project are “highly departed” from their natural state due to a lack of fire.“Those kinds of numbers really highlight the unhealthy condition of the forest as it currently is,” said Holly Krake, a spokeswoman for the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest. “An analogy would be, think of any small town with no young children, nobody in middle age, no high school students, no working young adults or young families–a place with everybody being the same age. That would be a pretty unhealthy place.”Krake also noted that the Forest Service uses other tools besides timber harvests to maintain native plants and wildlife in Georgia’s national forests. For example, on the Chattahoochee-Oconee national forests, forest managers treated more than 34,000 acres using prescribed fire in fiscal 2015. That falls in line with previous years, as foresters have treated an average of nearly 30,000 acres each year using prescribed burns over the past decade.“The right fire at the right place at the right time helps maintain healthy forests, communities and watersheds,” Krake wrote in an e-mail.While environmental groups also recognize the importance of fire in healthy forest ecosystems, they disagree with what the Forest Service calls restoration as well as the need for so-called restoration projects that feature timber harvesting. Hunter of the Southern Environmental Law Center noted that past fire suppression isn’t as big of an issue in the wet and humid Southeast as it has been in other national forests, particularly in the dry western states. That said, he acknowledged that many national forests are in an unnatural state currently, thanks to poor management practices in the past.The trick, he said, will be for the Forest Service to address areas that need recovery without causing more damage than what they’re trying to repair. “The sweet spot is for the Forest Service to be able to go in and do that work to improve communities without causing the bad impacts often associated with timber sales, like road building and bringing in heavy equipment and big trucks,” Hunter said. “They need to implement science-based treatments that are beneficial to the environment.”For now, it remains to be seen whether the Forest Service can achieve that goal in the Chattooga watershed. But Hunter and other environmentalists will be watching their efforts closely.Another Threat to the Deliverance RiverStekoa Creek, one of the Chattooga’s largest tributaries, has been a major source of water pollution in the river for more than 40 years, and things haven’t gotten any better with the river’s Wild and Scenic status. The primary source of pollution is raw sewage from the nearby city of Clayton’s sewage collection system, along with poor agricultural practices, failing septic tanks, and dumping. The Chattooga Conservancy calls Stekoa Creek the single greatest threat to the river’s water quality, noting that the Forest Service has at times warned river users that contact with water below its confluence with the Chattooga River could put them at risk for bacterial skin infections.[divider]related articles[/divider]last_img read more

Reconstruction project to close Glenwood Avenue in Binghamton for weeks

first_imgBINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The city of Binghamton is alerting residents to a road closure that will last around 60 days. Funding for the project comes through the Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery, the city says. The office of Mayor David says Glenwood Avenue between Brown and Clinton Streets will be closed beginning March 2 to allow for reconstruction of a storm water pumping station under the railroad viaduct on the road.last_img

Dutch woman dies of Marburg fever

first_imgJul 11, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A Dutch woman who fell ill with Marburg hemorrhagic fever after visiting a bat-infested cave in Uganda has died, Dutch authorities announced today.Authorities said the 40-year-old woman, who was not identified, died overnight at Leiden University Medical Centre, according to reports from Reuters and Agence France-Presse (AFP). The woman’s illness was first announced yesterday.In a statement yesterday, the World Health Organization (WHO) said the woman was reportedly exposed to fruit bats during a visit to the “python cave” in the Maramagambo forest on Jun 19. The cave is thought to harbor bat species that have been found to carry Marburg virus and its close relative, Ebola virus, in other parts of Africa, the agency said.”A large bat population was seen in the cave and the woman is reported to have had direct contact with one bat,” the WHO said.The woman had visited another cave 3 days earlier, but no bats were seen there, the WHO said. She returned to the Netherlands in good health on Jun 28, but she became ill with a fever Jul 2 and was hospitalized Jul 5. She deteriorated rapidly and suffered liver failure and severe hemorrhaging Jul 7.WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl said people who had contact with the woman have been monitored and have not shown any symptoms, Reuters reported. The WHO statement said no attempts were made to alert passengers who were on the woman’s return flight from Uganda, because she didn’t get sick until 4 days after the flight.”The chance of the virus spreading through the Netherlands is very small,” the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) said in a statement yesterday. Marburg virus spreads through contact with bodily fluids of infected people or animals.Hartl said people don’t need to cancel trips to Uganda because of the case, but they should not enter caves with bats, according to Reuters.Uganda’s health ministry issued a statement advising people entering caves or mines in the western district of Kamwenge to take “maximum precaution not to get into close contact with the bats and non-human primates in the nearby forests,” Reuters reported.The story said the Kitaka mine in Kamwenge, about 155 miles from Kampala, the capital, was closed last August after three miners contracted Marburg and one died.There is no specific treatment or vaccine for Marburg fever, which is fatal in up to 90% of cases. In a major outbreak in Angola in 2004 and 2005, 227 of 252 confirmed cases were fatal.See also: Jul 10 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2008_07_10/en/index.htmlJul 10 RIVM statementhttp://www.rivm.nl/en/Library/Common_and_Present/Newsmessages/2008/Dutch_tourist_infected_with_Marburg_virusJul 10 CIDRAP News story “Marburg fever case reported in Netherlands”last_img read more

The Council of Ministers of B&H to help the Basketball Federation of B&H with 100.000 BAM

first_imgThe basketball national teams of B&H are these days stringing exceptional successes and bringing joy to many BH fans. As confirmed by the Minister of Civil Affairs of Bi&H Adil Osmanovic, this Ministry, i.e. the Council of Ministers of B&H, reached a decision to help the Basketball Federation of B&H with 100.000 BAM and to thus partially overcome the difficult financial situation in which this federation found itself.Igor Stojanovic, the director of the basketball national teams whom there are currently seven, said yesterday that the successes of the BH basketball players are the result of the work of the Basketball Federation of B&H, that has been bringing together the best young basketball players from all parts of B&H for the past four years.Stojanovic said that some institutions stand behind these yound people, but not those who should, especially referring to the Council of Ministers which should, he stated, allocate the funds for the state national teams. Due to this, the state basketball national team relies on other levels of authority.Adil Osmanovic, the Minister of Civil Affairs of B&H, said that he is aware of the problem in which the Basketball Federation of B&H is, as well as the other sports federations at the state level, adding that they are trying to provide solutions for them.“Some 15 days ago, The Ministry of Civil Affairs of B&H launched the initiative to allocate some funds from the budget reserve for the Basketball Federation of B&H, but also for the Olympic Committee of B&H. The means in the amount of 100.000 BAM will be allocated for each, and the Council of Ministers of B&H has already adopted this decision, and it is just being waited for it to be published in the Official Gazette of B&H”, said Osmanovic.Osmanovic added that the Council of Ministers of B&H will consider some other options to help the Basketball Federation of B&H, which has been achieving superb results.“In my opinion, the Council of Ministers of B&H should allocate even greater financial resources for the federations at the state level in the budget for 2016”, Osmanovic said.(Source: klix.ba)last_img read more

DESORMEAUX’S EXAGGERATOR & BAFFERT’S MOR SPIRIT HEADLINE COMPETITIVE GRADE II, $400,000 SAN FELIPE STAKES AT 1 1/16 MILES

first_imgMOR SPIRIT: A better-than-looked 1 ½ length winner of the Grade III, 1 1/16 miles Robert B. Lewis Stakes here Feb. 6, he took the Grade I Los Alamitos Futurity at the same distance on Dec. 19. Although he’s proven a bit reluctant on occasion in the mornings, the Pennsylvania-bred ridgling by Eskendereya is progressing nicely for Baffert who won last year’s San Felipe with Dortmund, who provided him with his record fifth San Felipe win. Owned by Michael L. Petersen, Mor Spirit has been ridden to all three of his career wins by Gary Stevens, who’s back aboard on Saturday. – UNCLE LINO: A sharp second in his first route try to Mor Spirit in the 1 1/16 miles Robert B. Lewis, this improving son of Uncle Mo will try to establish himself as a top tier Derby hopeful for trainer Gary Sherlock. Ridden in all four of his starts by Fernando Perez, Uncle Lino pressed a solid pace in the Lewis and finished well. Owned by Tom Mansor, Purple Shamrock Racing or Sherlock, Uncle Lino will get an “acid test” in the San Felipe.   EXAGGERATOR: A big second to undefeated Eclipse Champion Nyquist in Santa Anita’s Grade II, seven furlong San Vicente Stakes Feb. 15, this Kentucky-bred colt by Curlin figures to improve with the added distance and a recent race under his belt. Owned by Big Chief Racing, LLC, Head of Plains, LLC, Rocker O Ranch LLC and Keith Desormeaux, he’s proven to be a versatile sort who can press the pace or stalk. With a pair of graded stakes wins to his credit, he has three overall wins and two seconds from seven starts, good for career earnings of $1,023,120. He’ll again be ridden by Desormeaux’s Hall of Fame brother, Kent. UNBEATEN CAL-BRED SMOKEY IMAGE, UNCLE LINO & DANZING CANDY ALL HAVE BIG CHANCES IN FINAL PREP TO $1 MILLION SANTA ANITA DERBY WITH 85 KY. DERBY QUALIFYING POINTS AT STAKEcenter_img SMOKEY IMAGE: Much like California Chrome in 2014, undefeated California-bred Smokey Image will be trying graded stakes completion for the first time following a massive 8 ½ length win versus statebreds in the California Cup Derby at 1 1/16 miles on Jan. 30. Untouched in six starts, his last three versus Cal-breds, the chestnut colt by Southern Image tried two turns for the first time in the California Cup Derby Jan. 30, winning by 8 ½ lengths in gate to wire fashion. Trained by Carla Gaines, he’ll be ridden by California Chrome’s regular pilot, Victor Espinoza. Smokey Image is owned by Irvin Racing Stable and he’s banked $435,100. DANZING CANDY: Trained by Cliff Sise, Danzing Candy has been ultra impressive in a pair of allowance wins at the current Winter Meet, his most recent a 5 ¾ length gate to wire romp going a flat mile here on Feb. 4. Lightly raced, this Kentucky-bred colt by Twirling Candy will make his stakes debut in the San Felipe, which will be his fourth career start and second around two turns. Bred by Ted Aroney’s Halo Farms and owned by Halo Farms, Bashor or Bashor, Danzing Candy has trained forwardly out of his most recent win and will be ridden for the third time in a row by Mike Smith.THE SAN FELIPE STAKES FIELD IN POST POSITION ORDERRace 7                   Approximate post time, 3:05 p.m. PTUncle – Lino Fernando Perez – 120Danzing Candy – Mike Smith – 120Mor Spirit – Gary Stevens – 124Cupid – Martin Garcia – 120I Will Score – Rafael Bejarano – 120Smokey Image – Victor Espinoza – 120Exaggerator – Kent Desormeaux – 122                The San Felipe Stakes, final major steppingstone to the Grade I, $1 million Santa Anita Derby on April 9, will award the winner 50 Kentucky Derby qualifying points. The second, third and fourth place San Felipe finishers will earn 20, 10 and 5 points respectively. ARCADIA, Calif. (March 9, 2016)–Keith Desormeaux’s Exaggerator and Bob Baffert’s Mor Spirit headline a talented group of seven three-year-olds in Saturday’s Grade II, $400,000 San Felipe Stakes at    1 1/16 miles. In addition to the top two, unbeaten California-bred Smokey Image and rapidly improving sophomores Uncle Lino and Danzing Candy all rate big chances with a total of 85 Kentucky Derby qualifying points at stake.last_img read more

Blake takes title in Sydney

first_imgAmerican James Blake capped his Australian Open preparations with his fourth career ATP Tour title, beating Russian Igor Andreev 6-2, 3-6, 7-6 (3) today in the Sydney International. Blake won the championship on his first match point when Andreev hit a backhand into the net. Blake appeared strong at the end despite the high humidity and temperatures around 86 degrees. Michaella Krajicek of the Netherlands won the Hobart (Australia) International with a 6-2, 6-1 win over practice partner Iveta Benesova on Friday. Andy Roddick advanced to the final of the Kooyong Classic exhibition tournament in Melbourne, Australia when Nicolas Kiefer retired with an injured ankle Friday. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! In the final set Andreev broke serve to take a 5-4 lead, but Blake broke back immediately to keep himself in the match. Blake is seeded 20th for the Australian Open, which begins Monday. center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGift Box shows no rust in San Antonio Stakes win at Santa Anita Justine Henin-Hardenne overcame deficits in the last two sets to rally for a 4-6, 7-5, 7-5 win Friday over Francesca Schiavone in the women’s final of the Sydney International. Heineken Open Finland’s Jarkko Nieminen beat Croatia’s Mario Ancic 6-2, 6-2 in the final of the Heineken Open today in Auckland, New Zealand, winning his first ATP Tour title. Nieminen made swift work of Ancic, breaking his serve in the third and seventh games of the first set and in the fifth and seventh games of the second. Ancic made his 25th unforced error on match point, giving Nieminen the win in 61 minutes. In other events … Top-seeded Anabel Medina Garrigues won the Canberra (Australia) International on Friday with a 6-4, 0-6, 6-4 victory over South Korea’s Cho Yoon-jeong. last_img read more

Gin Kings aim to sustain run

first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Matthew Wright, Jeff Chan and import Brandon Brown will be leading the Fuel Masters.Meanwhile, Blackwater, another team that has a hot streak going—actually its franchise-best run—will shoot for a fourth straight victory when it clashes with TNT KaTropa in the 4:15 p.m. contest.Henry Walker arrived and rejuvenated the Elite, who will be seeking to claim another big fish in the Texters and step up their drive for the next round.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Read Next PBA IMAGESWith a four-game winning streak and looking more fearsome, Barangay Ginebra slugs it out with slumping Phoenix Petroleum to try to inch closer to a quarterfinal berth in the PBA Governors’ Cup.Playing like a well-oiled machine and with plenty of time to get even better in their bid for a repeat, the Gin Kings are one of only a handful of sides given a chance of thwarting sister team San Miguel Beer’s Grand Slam bid.ADVERTISEMENT Wushu bet Balangui trips US foe, assures Team PH of Universiade medal Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension MOST READ View comments SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss SPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe other Ginebra weapons that complement its twin towers are import Justin Brownlee and a guard rotation—veteran LA Tenorio and Scottie Thompson—which could stand out as the most efficient in the league.Thompson is an all-around talent who, whatever is needed, gets things done. In a 94-80 ripping of luckless Alaska on Saturday in Cebu City, the 6-foot-1 former Perpetual Help ace in the NCAA missed a triple double by two points after getting 11 rebounds and 10 assists. Greg Slaughter is slowly but surely getting back to peak form, and Japeth Aguilar has improved tremendously ever since Tim Cone took over as they form, hands-down, the most athletic, tallest frontline in the conference.Tip-off time is at 7 p.m. at Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay where the Fuel Masters hope to author an upset and arrest a six-game losing streak to get back in the playoff hunt.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water polo Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Former Florida Star Brandon Spikes Tweets Photo Of Title Rings, Calls Playing For Gators “Best Decision” Of His Life

first_imgBrandon Spikes's Florida national championship rings.Today is college football’s National Signing Day, which means that two things are happening. One – the nation’s top recruits are deciding where to spend the next four years of their lives. Two – former players are reminiscing about the decisions they made. Former Florida star Brandon Spikes, who now plays for the Buffalo Bills in the NFL, is looking back quite fondly.Spikes took to Twitter Wednesday afternoon to post photos of the title rings he was able to accumulate during his stay in Gainesville. He was part of two BCS title teams. He said that playing for UF was the “best decision” he’s ever made.Best decision I ever made was going to University Of Florida! #kissTheRings #GoGators #GatorNation pic.twitter.com/ivq2rQtc1Q— BrandonSpikes51 (@BrandonSpikes51) February 4, 2015Best decision I ever made was going to University Of Florida! #kissTheRings #GoGators #GatorNation pic.twitter.com/bmerDzrtam— BrandonSpikes51 (@BrandonSpikes51) February 4, 2015Florida’s class is currently ranked No. 46, but new head coach Jim McElwain hasn’t had as much time to recruit as his peers. Tweets from former stars like Spikes certainly don’t hurt the cause.last_img read more