Ionospheric scintillation over Antarctica during the storm of 5-6 April 2010

first_imgOn 5 April 2010 a coronal mass ejection produced a travelling solar wind shock front that impacted the Earth’s magnetosphere, producing the largest geomagnetic storm of 2010. The storm resulted in a prolonged period of phase scintillation on Global Positioning System (GPS) signals in Antarctica. The scintillation began in the deep polar cap at South Pole just over 40 minutes after the shock front impact was recorded by a satellite at the first Lagrangian orbit position. Scintillation activity continued there for many hours. On the second day significant phase scintillation was observed from an auroral site (81{degree sign} S) during the post-midnight sector in association with a substorm. Particle data from polar orbiting satellites provide indication of electron and ion precipitation into the Antarctic region during the geomagnetic disturbance. Total Electron Content (TEC) maps show enhanced electron density being drawn into the polar cap in response to southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma enhancement structure then separates from the dayside plasma and drifts southward. Scintillation on the first day is coincident spatially and temporally with both a plasma depletion region in the dayside noon sector, and in the dayside cusp. On the second day scintillation is observed in the nightside auroral region, and appears to be strongly associated with ionospheric irregularities caused by E-region particle precipitation.last_img read more

Sex-specific effects of wind on the flight decisions of a sexually-dimorphic soaring bird

first_img1. In a highly dynamic airspace, flying animals are predicted to adjust foraging behaviour to variable wind conditions to minimize movement costs.2. Sexual size dimorphism is widespread in wild animal populations, and for large soaring birds which rely on favourable winds for energy‐efficient flight, differences in morphology, wing loading and associated flight capabilities may lead males and females to respond differently to wind. However, the interaction between wind and sex has not been comprehensively tested.3. We investigated, in a large sexually dimorphic seabird which predominantly uses dynamic soaring flight, whether flight decisions are modulated to variation in winds over extended foraging trips, and whether males and females differ.4. Using GPS loggers we tracked 385 incubation foraging trips of wandering albatrosses Diomedea exulans , for which males are c . 20% larger than females, from two major populations (Crozet and South Georgia). Hidden Markov models were used to characterize behavioural states—directed flight, area‐restricted search (ARS) and resting—and model the probability of transitioning between states in response to wind speed and relative direction, and sex.5. Wind speed and relative direction were important predictors of state transitioning. Birds were much more likely to take off (i.e. switch from rest to flight) in stronger headwinds, and as wind speeds increased, to be in directed flight rather than ARS. Males from Crozet but not South Georgia experienced stronger winds than females, and males from both populations were more likely to take‐off in windier conditions.6. Albatrosses appear to deploy an energy‐saving strategy by modulating taking‐off, their most energetically expensive behaviour, to favourable wind conditions. The behaviour of males, which have higher wing loading requiring faster speeds for gliding flight, was influenced to a greater degree by wind than females. As such, our results indicate that variation in flight performance drives sex differences in time–activity budgets and may lead the sexes to exploit regions with different wind regimes.last_img read more

Former Countrywide agent launches ‘most intelligent yet’ investment platform

first_imgHome » News » Former Countrywide agent launches ‘most intelligent yet’ investment platform previous nextProptechFormer Countrywide agent launches ‘most intelligent yet’ investment platformRobert Jones says he already has 110,000 properties uploaded to his site, which is free both for agents and the public to use.Nigel Lewis14th August 20200862 Views A property search platform aimed squarely at investment properties buyers is launching on August 24th that aims to offer agents a free way to attract quality investor sales leads.PropertyXYZ has been co-founded and self-funded by former Beresford Adams agent and property investment specialist Robert Jones, who says his site already lists 110,000 properties from all over the UK, including many leading agents such as Leaders, Winkworth and Dexters.He claims the platform will be the most data-rich and ‘intelligent’ of its kind for investors looking for properties to buy property, but who want lots of research data and filters.The site will be free for anyone to use and agents can also upload properties via their XML feeds to the site for free too. Jones says his business will generate revenue by offering agents premium listings via its comparative ‘price matching’ feature.Several agents have already signed up to this service including Chester-based investment specialist Residential Estates.Quality not quantityJones says the site is not trying to encroach on agent’s market expertise, but instead offers access to qualified and warmed-up leads and offers ‘quality not quantity’, he claims.“We’re not looking to remove the agent from the property investment buying process,” he says.PropertyXYZ also claims to have a database of 10,000 investors who are already registered via its sister site, PropertyInvestments.co.uk.When it launches, visitors to the platform will be able to search for properties by several criterial including yield, refurbishment requirement and type of property including HMO and student.PropertyXYZ Robert Jones Beresford Adams Leaders Dexters winkworth August 14, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Student societies sign open letter calling for retraction of Weidel invitation

first_imgOn their Facebook page, the Oxford SU Campaign for Racial Awareness and Equality (CRAE), who signed the letter, wrote: “[Weidel’s] party’s race-baiting, anti-Muslim politics stand in direct opposition to the values that our community prides itself on.”The University’s LGBTQ+ Society, also signatories, added: “LGBTQ+ Soc supports the call for the Oxford Union to withdraw its invitation to far-right German politician, Alice Weidel.“We consider the views she expresses to be Islamophobic, homophobic and racist, and we do not believe there is a place for the expression of hatred at this university. Furthermore, the format of this event – a speech, with only a brief Q&A – is not accessible, nor is it conducive to healthy debate.“As a welfare society, we believe it is our duty to oppose the propagation of violent rhetoric in our university.”In a Facebook post sharing the letter, an Oxford student said: “If they can use their platform to promote racism and facism, we can use the platform to criticise them for it.”The Oxford Union has been contacted for comment on this joint letter.In a previous statement to Cherwell, President of the Oxford Union, Stephen Horvath, said: “The Oxford Union remains committed to the principles of political neutrality and free speech, and we invite a variety of political leaders from different countries and competing ideological camps.“In recent years, those perspectives featured and questioned at the Union have ranged from Julius Malema, leader of the radically leftist Economic Freedom Fighters in South Africa, to Marine Le Pen.“Alice Weidel is the leader of the largest opposition party in the German Parliament. After Dr Weidel’s speech in the Union’s debating Chamber, members will be welcome to ask her questions, and challenge her views if they wish.”Oxford SU and and the SU’s Campaign for Racial Awareness and Equality (CRAE) have also been contacted for comment.The Oxford Union have since cancelled Weidel’s speaker event.Union President Stephen Horvath told Cherwell: “Alice Weidel has cancelled her planned trip to the U.K. next week due to concerns with the security arrangements for aspects of her travels and engagements.“We regret to inform members that she will therefore not be speaking at the Oxford Union.”In a collective statement responding to the Union’s cancellation of the event, the signatories of the letter told Cherwell: “As Student Societies of Oxford University, we welcome the news that Alice Weidel will no longer be speaking at the Oxford Union next Wednesday. “However, it is deeply regrettable that the Union saw fit to invite an unashamed racist to speak in the first place. We note that the Union has previously hosted speakers such as the BNP leader Nick Griffin, the leader of National Rally Marine Le Pen, and the Holocaust denier David Irving. This is not the first time that students have been forced to tell the Union that neither their values nor those of their speakers are acceptable and we don’t believe that it will be the last.“We are proud of the collective effort of our community in opposing Weidel and the AfD and remain steadfast in our commitment to opposing fascism and racism, in all their forms.” 28 student societies and campaigns have signed an open letter calling for the Oxford Union to immediately withdraw their invitation to Alice Weidel.The leader of the far-right German political party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) is scheduled to speak at the Union next Wednesday, 7th November.The open letter reads: “As Student Societies of Oxford University, we write to express our grave concern at the Oxford Union’s decision to host leader of the far-right German political party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), Alice Weidel. We wish to make clear that Weidel and her values are not welcome in our community.“Since Weidel joined the party in 2012, she has pushed racist, Islamophobic and dehumanising rhetoric about migrants and refugees. Earlier this year, she used a Bundestag debate to denounce ‘girls in headscarves, knife-wielding men on government benefits and other good-for nothing people.’ She has described refugees as ‘illiterate’ and derided ‘grabby migrants’ who she claims bring ‘stone age Sharia populism’ to Germany. When asked in 2015 if she believes Islam poses a danger to Germany, she replied ‘of course.’“Since 2016 (Weidel became co-leader in 2017), the AfD has adopted an explicitly anti-Islam policy. Its most recent election manifesto contained a section on why ‘Islam does not belong to Germany.’ The party has also has drafted the proposals to ban ‘the construction and operation’ of mosques, claiming that they contribute ‘to the spread of Islamic teachings directed towards the removal of our legal order.’ AfD Party officials have called for migrants to be shot on sight at the border. Their manifesto is also distinctly homophobic, claiming that a ‘family’ can consist only of a father, mother and children.“We find it deeply concerning that this individual representing the Alternative für Deutschland should be invited to speak at the Oxford Union. Weidel’s reactionary, racist rhetoric stands in direct opposition to the student community’s values of equality and freedom from discrimination, contravenes the University’s own Equality policies, and goes against the central purpose of the University. “We call on the Oxford Union to withdraw their invitation to Weidel immediately, in the name of justice and equality for all.”last_img read more

Supplier shows off serve-overs

first_imgEquipment and products supplier Country Choice was promoting its serve-over format at Café+ as part of its Bake&Bite Café concept.Part of the Brakes group, Country Choice’s food-to-go concept enables retailers to prepare products, such as sandwiches and baguettes, in full view of the customer, capitalising on the trend for customer-facing serve-overs. The format can be put together off-site in around four days. Country Choice supplies everything except the freezer.The company was also highlighting its newest creation – its Boston’s coffee and American-style donut offering. The bean-to-cup coffee machines are complemented by five filled and decorated ball donuts, three decorated ring donuts and one glazed ring donut.last_img read more

Detailed guide: NHS test and trace: how it works

first_imgContact tracers will never: Contact tracers will never: NHS Test and Trace: if you work in – or have recently visited – a setting with other people (for example, a GP surgery, a school or a workplace). The use of face masks and other forms PPE does not exclude somebody from being considered a close contact, unless they are providing direct care with patients or residents in a health and care setting call you from 0300 013 5000. Local contact tracers will contact you from a local council number. If you’re unsure if this is genuine, please contact your local council for advice send you text messages from ‘NHStracing’ ask you to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact-tracing website ask for your full name to confirm your identity, and postcode to offer support while self-isolating ask about the coronavirus symptoms you have been experiencing ask you to provide the name, telephone number and/or email address of anyone you have had close contact with in the 2 days prior to your symptoms starting ask if anyone you have been in contact with is under 18 or lives outside of England Universal Credit Working Tax Credits income-related Employment and Support Allowance income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance Income Support Pension Credit Housing Benefit practical or social support for yourself support for someone you care for financial support Get a coronavirus test if you develop symptoms, you must continue to follow the rules to self-isolate with other members of your household and get a test to find out if you have coronavirus if you test positive for coronavirus, you must share information promptly and accurately about your recent contacts through NHS Test and Trace to help us alert other people who may need to self-isolate if you have had close recent contact with someone who has coronavirus, you must self-isolate if NHS Test and Trace advises you to do so if you are returning from travel abroad it is important to check whether you need to self-isolate Test: get a free NHS test immediately to check if you have coronavirus or call 119 if you have no internet access. England is still in a national lockdown. You must stay at home, leaving only where permitted by law, and follow the rules in this guidance. high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature) new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual) loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this means you’ve noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal Part 2: if you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace because you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus a health or care setting, such as a hospital or care home a prison or other secure setting a school for people with special needs critical national infrastructure or areas vital for national security when NHS Test and Trace has been unable to contact you after an agreed amount of time and your local authority has set up a system to take over your case Isolate: you will be told to begin self-isolation for 10 days from your last contact with the person who has tested positive. It’s really important to do this even if you don’t feel unwell because you could still be infectious to others. Your isolation period includes the date of your last contact with them and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your last contact with them was at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th. Failure to self-isolate for the full time period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000. Your household doesn’t need to self-isolate with you, if you do not have symptoms, but they must take extra care to follow the guidance on social distancing and handwashing and avoid contact with you at home. What we will ask youWe will ask you: The NHS COVID-19 appThe new NHS COVID-19 app, now available to download for free in England and Wales, is the fastest way to see if you’re at risk from coronavirus. The faster you know, the quicker you can alert and protect your loved ones and community.The app has a number of tools to protect you, including contact tracing, local area alerts and venue check-in. It uses proven technology from Apple and Google, designed to protect every user’s privacy.Part 1: people who develop symptoms of coronavirusThis section applies if you have symptoms of coronavirus or you have received a positive test result.When to self-isolateThe medical advice is clear: you must self-isolate if you have coronavirus symptoms or live in the same household as somebody who does. The main symptoms of coronavirus are: For more information, read the further guidance on symptoms.If you have one or more of these symptoms, you must self-isolate straight away for 10 days – or longer if you still have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell/taste. Your isolation period includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th.If you live in the same household as someone with coronavirus symptoms, you must self-isolate straight away for 10 days. This includes the day their symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your 10 day isolation period starts on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 hrs on the 25th.You may find this stay at home illustration useful.You can now get a test if you do not have symptoms. Read the further guidance on getting a free test.Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000.How to get a testAnyone with symptoms can get a coronavirus test, whatever their age. call you from 0300 013 5000 send you text messages from ‘NHS’ ask for your full name and date of birth to confirm your identity, and postcode to offer support while self-isolating ask if you are experiencing any coronavirus symptoms provide advice on what you must do as you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus If you don’t have access to the internet, you can get a test by phoning 119.Our guidance on testing has more information on our testing programme.If you test negativeIf you get a negative test result, this means you are at low risk of having coronavirus.Other members of your household can stop self-isolating. If you feel well and no longer have symptoms similar to coronavirus, you can stop self-isolating. You could still have another virus, such as a cold or flu – in which case it is still best to avoid contact with other people until you are better.If you test positiveIf you get a positive test result, this means that when you took the test, you had coronavirus. You – and other members of your household – must continue to self-isolate.Health and care workersIf you work in a health or care setting, you should follow the separate guidance for health and care workers on testing and when to return to work.Telling people about your test resultIf you develop symptoms, you may wish to alert the people with whom you have had close contact over the last 2 days. You should tell them that you might have coronavirus but are waiting for a test result.At this stage (until the test result is known), those people do not need to self-isolate, but they should take extra care in practising social distancing and good hygiene, like washing their hands regularly. They should also watch out for their own symptoms.You may want to write down your recent close contacts now so that you have them to hand if you test positive.Sharing information about your recent contactsIf you get a positive test, we will contact you and ask you to share information about any close contacts you had just before or after you developed symptoms. This is vital if we are to stop the spread of the virus.We will contact you by text message, email or phone. If you are under 18 years old, we will contact you by phone wherever possible and ask for your parent or guardian’s permission to continue the call.You will be sent a link to the NHS Test and Trace website and asked to create a confidential account where you can record details about your recent close contacts. If you do not have internet access or if you don’t complete the online process, one of our contact tracers will phone you to gather this information from you.The information you give will be handled in strict confidence and will only be kept and used in line with data protection laws. It will help us to contact people who are at risk of having been exposed to coronavirus and explain what they must do to help prevent the further spread of the virus.Some local authorities have their own contact tracing teams who are employed by the local council. NHS Test and Trace may pass your details to these local teams if you have tested positive for coronavirus and they have not been able to contact you for 24 hours. These teams work with local public health experts and will usually contact you by phone and text. In certain circumstances they may visit you at your home to ask you to make further contact with them or to ask about your contacts.When we contact people to advise them to self-isolate, we do not tell them your identity. But if you have alerted them when you first develop symptoms or when you get your test result, they will be better prepared for the advice we give them.When we contact youIf NHS Test and Trace contacts you, the service will use text messages, email or phone.All texts or emails will ask you to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact-tracing website.If NHS Test and Trace calls you by phone, the service will be using the phone number 0300 013 5000.All information you provide to NHS Test and Trace is held in strict confidence and will only be kept and used in line with the Data Protection Act 2018.Contact tracers will: Share contacts: if you test positive for coronavirus, NHS Test and Trace will send you a text or email alert or call you with instructions of how to share details of people with whom you have had close, recent contact and places you have visited. It is important that you respond quickly and accurately so that we can give appropriate advice to those who need it. You will be told to do this online via a secure website or you will be called by one of our contract tracers. If NHS Test and Trace contact tracers are unable to contact you for 24 hours, they may pass your case to your local authority to follow up by phone or in person. Results: if your test is positive, you must complete the remainder of your 10-day self-isolation. Anyone in your household must also complete self-isolation for 10 days from when you started having symptoms. Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000. If your test is negative you will no longer be required to self-isolate, though you may wish to do so if you still feel unwell and have symptoms similar to coronavirus. If your test is negative, other household members no longer need to self-isolate. Pharmacies will not be able to deliver your medicines unless you provide them with your unique contact tracing reference number.center_img How the rules changed on 29 MarchSome of the rules on what you can and cannot do changed on 29 March. However, many restrictions remain in place. Find out what you can and cannot do. ensures that anyone who develops symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) can quickly be tested to find out if they have the virus, and also includes targeted asymptomatic testing of NHS and social care staff and care home residents helps trace close recent contacts of anyone who tests positive for coronavirus and, if necessary, notifies them that they must self-isolate at home to help stop the spread of the virus Test if needed: if you develop symptoms of coronavirus, other members of your household must self-isolate immediately at home for 10 days and you must get a test to check if you have coronavirus or call 119 if you have no internet access. Other people in your household can now get a test if they do not have symptoms. Read the further guidance on getting a free test. You and your household’s isolation period includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th. If your test is positive, you must continue to stay at home for at least 10 days and we will get in touch to ask about your contacts since they must self-isolate. If your test is negative, you must still complete your 10-day self-isolation period because the virus may not be detectable yet – this is crucial to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus. You may find this stay at home illustration useful. Support for people who are self-isolatingWe will direct you to your local authority helpline if you need the following during the period of self-isolation: We will ask you to provide, where possible, the names and contact details (for example, email address, telephone number) for the people you have had close contact with. As with your own details these will be held in strict confidence and will be kept and used only in line with data protection laws.If NHS Test and Trace identify you as a contact and you work in a critical service where the recommendation for you to self-isolate would have impact on providing that critical service, your employer will need to escalate this to the local health protection team (HPT) for a risk-assessment.How this information is usedBased on the information you provide, we will assess whether we need to alert your contacts and ask them to self-isolate.We may refer the case to local public health experts if your case is complex, for example, if you work in or have recently visited: The government has published the COVID-19 response – spring 2021 setting out the roadmap out of the current lockdown for England. This explains how restrictions will be eased over time. Alert: you will be alerted by NHS Test and Trace if you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus. The alert will usually come by text, email or phone call. You should then log on to the NHS Test and Trace website, which is normally the easiest way for you and the service to communicate with each other – but, if not, a trained call handler will talk you through what you must do. Under-18s will get a phone call and a parent or guardian will be asked to give permission for the call to continue you have been asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace you are employed or self-employed you cannot work from home and will lose income as a result you are receiving at least one of the following benefits: Local public health experts are Public Health England staff and teams employed by your local authority who work together with all parts of the local community to prevent or respond to local outbreaks.Part 2: people who have had close contact with someone who has coronavirusThis section applies to those who have been identified by NHS Test and Trace as a close contact.If you are told to self-isolateIf we identify you as someone who has had close recent contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus, we will notify you that you must self-isolate in line with medical advice and the law.It is a legal requirement to self-isolate if you are identified as a contact and told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace. Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000.You may be feeling well and not have any symptoms, but it is still essential for you to follow the advice that you are given.This is because, if you have been infected, you could be infectious to others. Some people infected with the virus don’t show any symptoms at all and it is therefore crucial to self-isolate to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus.You can now get a test if they do not have symptoms. Read the further guidance on getting a free test. If you choose to get a test, you must continue to self-isolate, even if your result is negative. This is because even if you don’t have symptoms, you could still pass the infection on to others.How you will be told to self-isolateIf you are aged 18 or over, we will contact you by text message or email but will follow up by phone if we don’t get a response. If we only have a landline number for you, we will contact you on that number.If you are under 18 years old, we will contact you by phone wherever possible and ask for consent from your parent or guardian to continue the call.If you have internet access, we will ask you to log onto the NHS Test and Trace website. This is the simplest way of giving you the information you need and the opportunity to ask any questions. The online service will also ask you to confirm that you are following the advice on self-isolation.If you do not have internet access, we will arrange for a trained call handler to speak to you by phone to give you the information and advice you need.What happens nextYou must self-isolate for 10 days after you were in contact with the person who has tested positive for coronavirus. This is crucial to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus and failure to do so can result in a fine, starting from £1,000. Your isolation period includes the date of your last contact with them and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your last contact with them was at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th.Self-isolation means staying at home and not going outside your home at any time. If you live with other people, they do not need to self-isolate, but they should avoid contact with you as far as possible and follow advice on hygiene. If you do not live with other people, you should seek help from others, or delivery services, for essential activities such as food shopping. Self-isolation can be particularly challenging if you are looking after children, or if you care for vulnerable people who cannot stay with friends or family.If you go on to develop symptoms, anyone you live with must then self-isolate and you must report your symptoms and get tested.It is crucial that you complete your 10-day self-isolation period if you’ve been identified as a contact, even if you get a negative test result. This is because you may have the virus, but it cannot yet be detected by a test, so you could unknowingly spread the virus if you leave the house. Other members of your household, however, do not need to remain in self-isolation.When we contact youIf NHS Test and Trace contacts you, the service will use text messages, email or phone.All texts or emails will ask you to sign into the NHS Test and Trace contact-tracing website.If NHS Test and Trace calls you by phone, the service will be using the phone number 0300 013 5000.All information you provide to NHS Test and Trace is held in strict confidence and will only be kept and used in line with the Data Protection Act 2018.Contact tracers will: ask at least one member of every party of customers or visitors (up to 6 people) to provide their name and contact details keep a record of all staff working on their premises and shift times on a given day and their contact details keep these records of customers, visitors and staff for 21 days and provide data to NHS Test and Trace if requested display an official NHS QR code poster from 24 September 2020, so that customers and visitors can ‘check in’ using this option as an alternative to providing their contact details adhere to General Data Protection Regulations if you have family members or other household members living with you. In line with the medical advice they must remain in self-isolation for the rest of the 10-day period from when your symptoms began if you have had any close contact with anyone other than members of your household. We are interested in the 2 days before you developed symptoms and the time since you developed symptoms. Close contact means: This specific guidance applies in England only. All 4 administrations are working closely together to have a consistent and joined-up approach to testing and tracing.Definitions‘Self-isolation if you have symptoms’ means you and all household members must remain at home. Do not go outside your home for any reason, that is to work, school or public areas, and do not use public transport or taxis. The guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection page has more information on self-isolation.‘Contact’ means a person who has been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus and who may or may not live with them.It is a legal requirement to self-isolate if you test positive for COVID-19 or if you are identified as a contact and told to self-isolate by Test and Trace. Failure to self-isolate for the full time-period can result in a fine, starting from £1,000.How NHS Test and Trace worksPart 1: for someone with symptoms of coronavirus having face-to-face contact with someone less than 1 metre away (this will include times where you have worn a face covering or a face mask) having been within 2 metres of someone for more than 15 minutes (either as a one-off contact, or added up together over one day) travelling in a car or other small vehicle with someone (even on a short journey) or close to them on a plane ask you to dial a premium rate number to speak to us (for example, those starting 09 or 087) ask you to make any form of payment or purchase a product of any kind ask for any details about your bank account ask for your social media identities or login details, or those of your contacts ask you for any passwords or PINs, or ask you to set up any passwords or PINs over the phone disclose any of your personal or medical information to your contacts provide medical advice on the treatment of any potential coronavirus symptoms ask you to download any software to your PC or ask you to hand over control of your PC, smartphone or tablet to anyone else ask you to access any website that does not belong to the government or NHS ask you to dial a premium rate number to speak to us (for example, those starting 09 or 087) ask you to make any form of payment or purchase a product or any kind ask for any details about your bank account ask for your social media identities or login details, or those of your contacts ask you for any passwords or PINs, or ask you to set up any passwords or PINs over the phone disclose any of your personal or medical information to your contacts provide medical advice on the treatment of any potential coronavirus symptoms ask you to download any software to your PC or ask you to hand over control of your PC, smartphone or tablet to anyone else ask you to access any website that does not belong to the government or NHS Employers should support workers who are told to self-isolate and must not ask them to attend work. See the guidance on the NHS Test and Trace service for employers, businesses and workers. If you are in employment, speak to your employer to discuss if you can work from home or other options are available during your period of isolation.Workers in self-isolation are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) for every day they are in isolation, as long as they meet the eligibility conditions. Guidance has been produced for employees that are unable to work because they are self-isolating.NHS Test and Trace will provide evidence that someone has been told to self-isolate. This evidence can be shared with an employer or education provider. Get an isolation note if you need evidence that you’ve been told to self-isolate.You may be entitled to a one-off payment of £500 through the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme if you are required to stay at home and self-isolate. You should go to your local authority’s website for more information. You will be eligible if you live in England and meet all the following criteria: This is so you can access the local support available to you, like help delivering food or with other practical tasks. You may also be able to get help from the NHS volunteer responders.The NHS volunteer responders programme remains active and support can be accessed by calling 0808 196 3646. For more details, visit the NHS volunteer responders programme.If you’re unable to collect your prescription medication because you’re self-isolating, a free medicines delivery service is available. First, you should ask if any friends, family or volunteers can collect medicines for you. If friends and family are not able to collect your medicines for you, and you or the pharmacy are unable to arrange for a volunteer through the NHS volunteer responders programme, then you will be eligible for free medicines delivery.Contact your pharmacy to tell them that you’re self-isolating and need your medicines delivered, and they will arrange this free of charge. We have introduced this service to help return life more to normal, in a way that is safe and protects our NHS and social care. The service allows us to trace the spread of the virus and isolate new infections and play a vital role in giving us early warning if the virus is increasing again, locally or nationally.How NHS Test and Trace helps fight the virusNHS Test and Trace will help to control the rate of reproduction (R), reduce the spread of the infection and save lives. By playing your part through the actions set out below, you will directly help to contain the virus by reducing its spread. This means that, thanks to your efforts, we will be able to go as far as it is safe to go in easing lockdown measures.Playing your part: Customer logs and NHS QR codesContinued opening up of the economy and public services is reliant on NHS Test and Trace being used to minimise transmission of the virus. In order to ensure that businesses and local services are able to remain open, we will be mandating that organisations in designated sectors must: In addition, the hospitality sector will be required to ensure that anyone visiting pubs, restaurants and other venues provides their contact information or checks in using the official NHS QR code before being allowed entry to the venue.Any designated venue that is found not to be compliant with these regulations will be subject to financial penalties. It is vital that relevant venues comply with these regulations to help keep people safe, and to keep businesses open.Designated venues will need to keep records of customers, visitors and staff for a period of 21 days and make them available when requested by NHS Test and Trace or local public health officials to help contain clusters or outbreaks.Find out more about the requirements around maintaining these records. Isolate:as soon as you experience coronavirus symptoms, medical advice is clear: you must self-isolate for at least 10 days. Your isolation period includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 on the 25th. You may also find this stay at home illustration useful. Anyone else in your household must self-isolate for 10 days from when you started having symptoms. This includes the day your symptoms started and the next 10 full days. Other people in your household can now get a test if they do not have symptoms. Read further guidance on getting a free test.last_img read more

[The Source Podcast] Dell EMC HEROES with Patti Moy

first_imgThe Dell EMC Heroes Program was launched at Dell EMC World 2017.  The program is designed to create a technical community between Dell EMC Systems Engineers and our Partners Systems Engineers globally.  The Heroes Program is all about you, our partners and connecting you with the latest information on our products, solutions and technologies.  Attend Quarterly Heroes Exchange events featuring the latest details on product features, roadmaps, and a solution showcase in your area.  Other offerings include a Semi-annual Partner Technology Advisory Board and Annual Partner CTO Summit, the Heroes Program is designed to enable you our partners to fully understand the scope of Dell Technologies and Dell EMC solutions.I sat down with Patti Moy, Director Dell EMC Heroes Program, to get a mid-year update on the program and what to expect leading into Dell Technologies World and the Global Partner Conference.  Patti talked about a holistic approach to Data Center Design, not just storage, not just servers but everything in the Data Center.If you’re a Dell EMC Partner, you can learn more about the Heroes Program on the Partner Portal, from your local Partner SE or by dropping a note to [email protected]; there is also a LinkedIn community hereGet Dell EMC The Source app in the Apple App Store or Google Play, and Subscribe to the podcast: iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play.Dell EMC The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)last_img read more

Board sets budget for academic year

first_imgSaint Mary’s Student Government Association (SGA) approved its revised budget Wednesday with a majority vote. The new budget presented to the Board had the same numbers as the previous budget, but student body president Rachael Chesley said the finance committee added a rationale, which helped clarify the decisions they made. “The finance committee was happy it was brought back to review so they could come up with a rationale and really be able to solidify why decisions were made in the first place,” Chesley said. Two concerns voiced in last week’s meeting were about the amount of money allotted to class boards and where the Capital Fund, money allotted for general campus improvements, would go. Class boards had asked for additional funds to pay for events such as parents’ weekends, but Griffin said that would be out of the realm of possibility. “We felt like we weren’t sure where we were taking money from to give class boards,” Griffin said. “The only way we could possibly make a difference would have to give you tens of thousands of more dollars.” Griffin also explained the need for the Capital Fund to help make improvements around campus, including renovating the student government offices and putting funds into Dalloway’s, the campus clubhouse. “Money from the Capital Fund would come into play,” Chesley said. “It is the leverage we need to fix things on campus.” Money that could be used for an updated version of the Notre Dame co-exchange program was added to the budget. The program, which was cut at the beginning of the academic year, allowed 75 Saint Mary’s students per day to have a meal at Notre Dame’s dining halls at no additional cost. Students have expressed concern over the cancellation of the program, which is now only available to students who need the tickets because they have classes or commitments at Notre Dame during meal times. Chesley said the addition of a budget for a new “social” co-exchange program doesn’t guarantee a new program will be formed, but will allow the Board funds to move forward on the issue. “I think we could do it and this is going to give us the financial leverage we need to even consider the different options for co-exs,” Chesley said. Chesley said she and student body vice president Laura Smith have continued to work on the issue, and are working on exhausting their options. “The goal that we’re looking toward is getting some form of social co-ex tickets back to students, free of charge to students,” Chesley said. After discussions closed, the budget was put to a vote and was passed by majority vote, meaning the Board can now start giving funds to campus boards, clubs and organizations. “We now have a budget. We can move forward with the year,” Chesley said.last_img read more

Sexual assault reported on campus

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) is investigating a report of sexual assault committed in the early hours of Friday morning, according to an email sent to students at 2:45 p.m. Friday.The reported assault occurred in a South Quad men’s residence hall, the email stated.The email quoted “du Lac: A Guide to Student Life,” Notre Dame’s official policy book, and warned students of the risks of sexual assault as well as the standards of consent.“Sexual assault can happen to anyone,” the email said. “Anyone initiating any kind of sexual contact with another person must seek consent and not engage in sexual contact unless consent is given.“On college campuses, perpetrators are more likely to assault an acquaintance than a stranger. Being aware of your own safety and watching out for your friends are important steps you can take to reduce the risk of sexual assault.“Being aware of your own safety and watching out for your friends are important steps you can take to reduce the risk of sexual assault.“The perpetrator, not the survivor, is responsible for any instance of sexual assault. Nothing a survivor does or does not do is an excuse for sexual assault.”Tags: NDSP, sexual assaultlast_img read more

Rescue crews come to the aid of a dog trapped in a waterfall in Menifee County, KY

first_imgVideo captures Italian boy being followed by enormous brown bear while out for a hike  The public viewing of the synchronous fireflies was cancelled this year due to public safety concerns over COVID-19. This once-a-year phenomenon is a favorite of visitors from around the world, who come to watch the lightening bugs blink and glow in an eerie, magical rhythm.  When rescue crews reached her, the pup was tired, wet, and scared but otherwise uninjured. The Wolfe County Search & Rescue Team said she was “all wags” as she reunited with her family. In a Facebook post, the search and rescue team said, “it doesn’t matter how many legs you have, Wolfe County Search and Rescue Team is there to help.” Search and rescue crews responded to a cry (or is it a bark?) for help from an unlikely source on Sunday, an Irish Wolfhound named Elola. The dog had wandered away from home and was stuck on a ledge in the middle of a waterfall. The Wolfe County Search & Rescue Team deployed their technical rope rescue technicians to assist the dog, who the rescue team described as “eager for help.” Ever find yourself glancing over your shoulder while hiking in bear country? If so, you won’t forget about this viral video anytime soon. In it, a 12-year-old boy walks calmly down a mountain in Northern Italy as a large brown bear trundled along behind him.  Bummed about missing the synchronous fireflies in the Smokies this year? Watch them online insteadcenter_img Rescue crews come to the aid of a dog trapped in a waterfall in Menifee County, KY The boy was collecting pinecones in the brush when he came upon the bear. As the bear began to follow him, the boy asked his stepdad to take a photo. His concerned mother can be heard in the background as his stepfather instructs him to “stay calm.” The bear stands up on its hind legs before scurrying off across the rocky slope of the mountain. The boy’s stepfather says that the boy is “a fan of bears,” was “thrilled” by his encounter and was not scared at all—that makes one of us.  Though you won’t be able to view the scene in person this year, you can catch a virtual viewing at 8 p.m. on June 1 when the nonprofit Discover Life in America (DLIA) posts the light display on its YouTube channel. “The footage is from lots of locations, some at Elkmont, some at Norton Creek. The footage is spectacular in my opinion,” Todd Witcher, DLIA executive director told the Citizen-Times.last_img read more